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Thread: Books in Films

  1. #41
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    In Patton, George C. Scott refers to Rommel's book, Infantry Attacks during the North African campaign shouting across the battlefield: "Rommel... you magnificent bastard, I read your book!" I don't recall if the book is shown.



    D.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornershop15
    Rick, I'm confused! Jane Wyman wasn't in Written on the Wind! I am sure you're thinking of one of the Douglas Sirk films those two stars made together, All That Heaven Allows - which I've seen but barely remember - and (the remake of) Magnificent Obsession, which I haven't. I recently bought a box set of the director's movies that includes all three of those mentioned so have the opportunity to find out.



    Last night I decided to watch Written on the Wind, for the first time I should add, and saw no evidence of ANY books being read so I can rule that one out! I will try to watch the Jane Wyman-Rock Hudson films over Christmas and look out for Walden, as well as provide a screencap (as evidence!). Thanks for inspiring me to watch all three films in quick succession - I might have ignored them for a long time otherwise.



    Merry Christmas, Rick
    Yes Cornershop. You are right. I've recently been doing a portfolio of cuttings for my manager at work whose favourite is 'Imitation of Life'. Its that just whenever I get the whiff of a Douglas Sirk movies I get a bit delirious that's all.



    I think it must be All that Heaven Allows; I don't have any of the videos here at home so will you please put me out of my misery when you find out?

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick C
    Yes Cornershop. You are right. I've recently been doing a portfolio of cuttings for my manager at work whose favourite is 'Imitation of Life'. Its that just whenever I get the whiff of a Douglas Sirk movies I get a bit delirious that's all.



    I think it must be All that Heaven Allows; I don't have any of the videos here at home so will you please put me out of my misery when you find out?
    Almost certainly All That Heaven Allows. Hudson plays a character who "marches to a different drum", he doesn't conform to conventional "morality" This would fit it in with the philosophy of Walden.

  4. #44
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    I remembered reading in a past post on Britmovie about Alan Price being seen reading 'The Road to Wigan Pier' in 'O Lucky Man', so I take you now to Alan's rather high-minded tour van, where there are clearly tomes on the table.





    A little later Alan is reading... (see bottom left of pic):



    "If you don't take that Castle soon the National Trust will."



    He helpfully reveals the book to be George Orwell but is it 'Wigan Pier'? (And there's a magazine in the screen grab at no extra cost!)


  5. #45
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    In Scott of the Antartic, Oates is seen reading Handley Cross by R.S. Surtees, later after his exit from the tent and life, the book is seen again when the others are breaking camp when it fall to the ground. Scott is also seen reading an edition of Tennyson's poems.



    Ringo, in A Hard Day's Night, is reading Anatomy of a Murder, in his scene with Wilfred Brambell, in the television canteen.



    John Lennon chooses his own book to read, A Spaniard in the Works, in Help!

  6. #46
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    Secret Agents would need to keep a book handy to while away the time in foreign parts ....... It's intriguing to think who chose. I imagine modern credit lists might include one for 'Book-Wrangler' or somesuch.
    =

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Thanks for your replies. That's a good one of Patrick McGoohan, Moor. I can just about tell he's reading Laurie Lee's Cider with Rosie. Bendigo, O Lucky Man is one of my favourite films. Thank you for those.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick C
    Yes Cornershop. You are right. ... I think it must be All that Heaven Allows; I don't have any of the videos here at home so will you please put me out of my misery when you find out?
    Hang on in there, Rick! I've now seen Douglas Sirk's films Written on the Wind and (last night) his remake of Magnificent Obsession for the first time, thanks to you, and will hopefully make it a hat-trick with All That Heaven Allows before the end of the year.



    Off to do more 'Deaths in 2009' now but will return later with my 'Rosemary's Baby Special'.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    One of the most memorable moments in this brilliant film is when Rosemary (Mia Farrow) opens a book called All of Them Witches, a gift from her late friend 'Hutch' (Maurice Evans), who, unbeknownst to her, had been 'killed off' by the Devil-worshippers next door. It immediately arouses her curiosity, as Hutch told her he suspected there was something odd and sinister about the elderly couple, and she begins to realise he was right.



    After being held up by nosy neighbour Ruth Gordon, she seizes her opportunity to browse the book:





    The first subject is Thomas Colley, who was a real person apparently:



    From Wikipedia:

    Thomas Colley (d. 24 Aug 1751) was an English murderer, executed for the murder of John and Ruth Osborne at Tring, Herts.


    Colley was one of the leaders of a mob which gathered at Tring in April 1751 and seized the Osbornes from the local workhouse, accusing them of witchcraft. The mob subjected the Osbornes to a ducking in Marlstone Mere, a nearby pond. Both victims were drowned, Colley beating them when they tried to clamber out of the water. Colley was convicted of murder and hanged in chains at Tring.




    The picture is actually of someone called Mary ? (can't make out the surname), who must be on

    the preceding page. Prudence Duvernoy is the name of a character in the famous story Camille.





    This was written by someone at the Bulletin Board of a website called hollywoodjesus.com, where there is a review of the film:

    Duvernoy, a milliner, may have been a confidante of Marie DuPlessis, the real "Lady of the Camellias" in Dumas' story. Dumas does not refer to witchcraft practiced by Duvernoy, only that she was 'vulgar' and 'bossy', spoke in a loud brassy voice, and acted as a manager for DuPlessis. Sounds like Minnie [Castavet, Ruth Gordon's character].



    This imposing figure looks like Walter Pigeon in period costume. Was there really an Adrian Marcato?:





    Filmsite.org's review of the film includes a transcription of the above page, which isn't too clear in my capture:

    Born in Glasgow in 1846, he was soon after brought to New York. He resided for several years in the United States but spent a great deal of time on the Continent. He was educated in England and during the course of his studies he became interested in Black Magic. Soon, he left England and devoted himself completely to Satanism. The peak of his popularity was in 1899 when he claimed to have called forth Satan and was attacked by mob outside the Bramford ... [the building where Rosemary and husband Guy (John Cassavetes) live. In reality, it's the Dakota, where John Lennon was one of the residents)].



    On the next page, Rosemary finds the same man pictured with his family:



    From the same filmsite.org:

    A dog-eared page illustrates a picture of Marcato with his wife and thirteen-year-old son Steven (underlined twice).



    This prompts one of my favourite scenes of all-time, where Rosemary finds an interesting use for her set of Scrabble letters. She was told by one of Hutch's friends that "the name is an anagram" and eventually deduces that Steven Marcato (Adrian's son) is in fact a rearrangement of Roman Castavet, her next door neighbour! He was played by Sidney Blackmer, who was Grace Kelly's father in High Society.



    When Guy returns home, Rosemary tells him what she's just discovered about her neighbour:



    The moment she says "There he is when he was thirteen. See the eyes?" is the next time she points!



    Fed up with her overactive imagination (but actually worried about how much she knows, seeing

    as he's joined their neighbours' coven), Guy hides the book where he thinks Rosemary can't find it:



    As you can see, Sammy Davis Jr.'s autobiography Yes I Can* is among the books propping it up.

    You only get a split-second in the film to see the Sexual Behaviour books so here's your chance!.



    Guy later upsets Rosemary when he tells her he's thrown the book away because of it's bad influence on her. I wonder what happened to that book after filming was completed? We know the fate of most of those featured in Fahrenheit 451 but it would be nice to find out this was safely preserved following it's Star appearance in one of the greatest Horror films ever made.



    * Amazon.com - [ame="http://amazon.com/Yes-Can-Story-Sammy-Davis/dp/0374522685"]Yes I Can: The Story of Sammy Davis Jr. [ILLUSTRATED] (Paperback)[/ame]

  9. #49
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    I finally got there, Rick, and enjoyed watching the films too! Many thanks for giving me the incentive to view three Douglas Sirk films in one week! All That Heaven Allows was the only one of the director's films I'd seen before, but a very long time ago and I remembered next to nothing, although the ending was vaguely familiar. Here is the image you've been waiting for, which occurs 27 minutes into the film, or rather the DVD:







    The extract she reads from Walden misses out a whole paragraph and some additional words:



    The mass of men lead lives of quiet desperation. Why should we be in such desperate haste to

    succeed? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a

    different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away




    Henry David Thoreau (12th July 1817 - 6th May 1862):



    An unexpectedly large image, as found at his Wikipedia profile

  10. #50
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    A book that interested me was one that didn't exist, featuring in the opening sequence of Don't Look Now - Beyond the Fragile Geometry of Space, written by Donald Sutherlands character. In those long gone pre-internet days I spent years casually looking for the book before this was pointed out to me.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Here you are, ican. I must admit I didn't remember this moment when I captured it just now:



    Thanks for answering my 'Blue head in a glass bowl' query earlier this year (The Frozen Dead).



    Happy Christmas and New Year.

  12. #52
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    Many thanks Cornershop....I always thought the book had some significance to the plot, perhaps it was just the title.



    I've felt like The Frozen Dead this week when taking the dog out for a walk!



    Happy New Year to you and all Britmovie members.

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain vincenzo's Avatar
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    In Looking For Mr Goodbar Diane Keaton is seen reading The Godfather (she appeared in the film) in the bar when she meets Richard Gere.

  14. #54
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Thanks, ican. It feels like this is going to be a long winter.



    Hugh, you did well to spot Anatomy of a Murder in The Beatles film. This was the best I could do

    in terms of showing as much of the book as possible, so Wilfred Brambell and Ringo don't look so

    good here. The young lady must be Rosemarie Frankland, as (the uncredited) 'Brunette Showgirl':


  15. #55
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cornershop15
    Thanks, ican. It feels like this is going to be a long winter.



    Hugh, you did well to spot Anatomy of a Murder in The Beatles film. This was the best I could do

    in terms of showing as much of the book as possible, so Wilfred Brambell and Ringo don't look so

    good here. The young lady must be Rosemarie Frankland, as (the uncredited) 'Brunette Showgirl':

    Cheers, CS I actually got the info of IMDB, so I ain't that clever, but I double checked the film to confirm it, and in an earlier shot you can see a still from AoM movie, where James Stewart is interviewing Lee Remick.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1o6nDCsiDbA


    At 1:42, "Is Sex Necessary?", by James Thurber and E.B. White

  16. #56
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    Can i assume there must have been a book displayed in the library scene of "Spy Who Came in from the Cold"?



    If this thread stretches to 'library scenes in movies' we could get anywhere!

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: England mallee59's Avatar
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    Michael Caine has a copy of the bible in Without a Clue, he keeps it at his bed side....

    mallee

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by dylan
    In Patton, George C. Scott refers to Rommel's book, Infantry Attacks during the North African campaign shouting across the battlefield: "Rommel... you magnificent bastard, I read your book!" I don't recall if the book is shown.



    D.


    I've just watched Patton - Scott's bedside reading is the mistitled Tanks in Attacks.



    D.

  19. #59
    GRAEME
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    I know it's not film, but TV...




  20. #60
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
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    If magazines count, in Airplane the nun sitting next to the boy is reading Boy's Life and he's reading Nun's Life.

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