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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan
    Generally speaking and overall, The Guns Of Navarone is a finely acted war epic with a wonderful score by Dimitri Tiomkin, but there are niggly things in it here and there that could have been done far better even then and today look ridiculous. Take the scene where Anna is shot. Being shot at such close range with an automatic pistol or revolver would cause her to be thrust violently backwards by the impact of the bullet. But there is no sense of impact when the bullet hits her. She just looks at her killer and then slumps slowly forward. I thought the same thing about the same kind of scene in The Blue Lamp when Jack Warner is shot at close range by Dirk Bogarde. At that range, the impact of the bullets would have sent him crashing backwards onto the pavement. But when he's shot, he just looks at Bogarde; holds his hand against his chest; closes his eyes and slumps to the ground. Totally unrealistic. I know they didn't like showing any blood in those days, but they could have made the shootings look a bit more real than that.


    Ummm, conservation of momentum means that they could well have just fallen dead after the bullet penetrates them. Scala's sat down, so she wouldn't have jumped that far if Irene Papas had shot her in the heart, say. A shot there may well give you a moment alive before the O2 ceases to hit the brain. Folks being shot don't fly through the air from impact; sometimes a reaction from the blow makes the person jump, sure. Ballistics is really complicated though, but the flying through the air lark has been disproved in scientific papers. I'd have picked The Guns Of Navarone scene apart for the silencers being too effective.



    My favourite goof in the film is the accidental blowing up of the Greek Navy's real life E-boat. They used way too much explosive and had a bit of explaining to do afterwards. If the commandos had been on deck when it went up, they'd have likely all been killed.



    EDIT: I just had another look at Scala's shooting scene. She does recoil. They didn't bother with the ketchup, but that could be handwaved away.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    You seem to know more about ballistics than I do, Neil. But I'll always remember Cary Grant's speech in The Pride and The Passion about there being a ratio between mass and velocity. The faster an object is travelling, the more it weighs on impact. The cannon balls they are going to fire at the walls of Avila from the huge cannon weigh ninety-six pounds each and at the point of impact, they will be travelling fast enough to weigh nine thousand pounds each. If you scale that cannon ball down to the size of a pistol bullet, the bullet may weigh a few thousand ounces on impact. A bit like being punched in the body by a crashing right fist.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    DBF, do you still have the screencap that's now missing from the first post? If so, can you upload it again?

    Dated 11th July 1960:



    David Niven, in formal attire for a day at the races, laughs with his Guns of Navarone
    co-stars Gregory Peck & Stanley Baker, who are in costume, as he takes the day off.


    This time next week, Corbis, my favourite photo site, "will no longer be accessible". Their "best imagery and motion content" will be moving to Getty Images, whose ever-changing watermarks are far more distracting. Does this mean that not all of the photographs will make it to their new home?

    Until the unhappy day arrives (2nd May), I will be trying to save as many pictures of my favourite films, actors and pop stars as well as the website's most eye-catching sport and fashion stills. I'm sure I've already collected thousands of them (over the last eight years I think it is) but time is running out with those I've missed.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    I haven't got that frame on my hard drive any more, cornershop. But when I've got time, I get the DVD out and capture the frame again and upload it here.

  5. #25
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    Just finished reading the second book of Richard Todd's autobiography.Apparently he turned down a part in GON.Presumably the part taken by Niven after John Davis refused to loan out Kenneth Moore.Todd also turned down Ice Cold In Alex.No wonder his career hit the doldrums in the sixties.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Even though it's a day for night scene, as a moving image, it can plainly be seen that the plane in the sky is just hanging there in mid-air.


  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    A stunning picture, DBF. Many thanks

    (Anthony) Quinn enjoyed the location work so much he bought property on the island of Rhodes. In
    recognition, the government renamed an inlet "Anthony Quinn Bay"
    (TCM's Trivia page for the film):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pzOrO71ZSoo

  8. #28
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    Just finished reading the second book of Richard Todd's autobiography.Apparently he turned down a part in GON.Presumably the part taken by Niven after John Davis refused to loan out Kenneth Moore.
    Someone needs to write a book about John Davies' role in the collapse of the British industry. Surely, he was the worst studio head of all time (until David Puttnam).

  9. #29
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    Yes it is a great surprise that his role in the eventual downsizing of Rank is given greater space.There was an infamous dinner at the Dorchester where Moore in a rather inebriated state interrupted tespeech of Davis.In spite Davis refused to let Moore be loaned for the Niven part.Moores film career never recovered.
    aving said all that he had no option to do a lot of the nasty things.
    Rank was persuaded by the government in the late forties to fill the void created when the americans refused to import films because of the 75% duty imposed on them.So he went ahead and did this and of course the government,via Harold Wilson,then President of the Board of Trade,agreed a deal with the Americans.So just at the time when the new British films were appearing in the cinemas they were swamped by a tsunami of new American films.This left Rank millions of pounds in debt and Davis was appointed to do the pruning.For example the cartoon unit was closed down as was Denham Studios.Favoured producers such as Michael Balcon and Powell & Pressburger were let go and Independant Frame was abandoned.However to be honest he comes across as not someone you want to walk past in a dark alley.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Country: England cassidy's Avatar
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    Lewis Gilbert in his book mentions that years after Reach For The Sky was made he was invited to lunch with John Davis who was retired but still had an office. He says that the man who had terrorised The Rank Organisation was now a kindly white haired old gentleman reminiscing about a golden past.

  11. #31
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassidy View Post
    Lewis Gilbert in his book mentions that years after Reach For The Sky was made he was invited to lunch with John Davis who was retired but still had an office. He says that the man who had terrorised The Rank Organisation was now a kindly white haired old gentleman reminiscing about a golden past.
    So was Josef Mengele a kindly white haired old gentleman reminiscing about a golden past

    Steve

  12. #32
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    So was Josef Mengele a kindly white haired old gentleman reminiscing about a golden past
    Unless your watching The Boys From Brazil....

    Most tyrants tend to erase all the horrible stuff they've done from their memories, or explain it away. Davis sounds like one of them, and I suspect Eddie Mannix probably did the same (now there is someone who needs a book written about them!). Is there any books on Rank which might put his behaviour into context?

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