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  1. #101
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    Hi Pitchfork, glad you appreciate them!


  2. #102
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    continued....."six tracks stereo dubbing", as quoted above, did not become a reality at Pinewood until 1978. Gordon K.MacCallum, chief dubbing mixer in Pinewood's Theater 2, mixed "Superman" in 'discrete' six-track as opposed to the standard 4-track stereo (Left, Center, Right and mono Surround) which he had started in 1961 with "El-Cid". Since then Pinewood has mixed many films in this stereo format. For example, the Bronston films ("55 Days at Peking", "Fall of the Roman Empire" and "Circus World" aka "Magnificent Showman"), "Zulu", "First Men in the Moon", "Battle of the Bulge", "Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines", "Khartoum", "Krakatoa", "Custer of the West", "Waterloo" and "Ryan's Daughter" just to name a few.
    Six-track discrete dubbing could only be done in Hollywood.
    In 1968, Producer Albert 'Cubby' Broccoli wanted a six-track mix for his film "Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang". Pinewood did some 'pre-mixing', but the film had to be shipped to Todd-AO sound department in Hollywood for its six-track mix (Left, Left 'extra', Center, Right 'extra', Right and mono surround).
    Pinewood's 4-track mixes that required a 6-track mix for 70mm 'roadshow' presentation utilized Technicolor's method of artificially creating a 'six-track printing master' for the magnetic striping of 70mm prints. In 1968, Shepperton installed six-track print-mastering for its production of "Oliver!". Their main mixes, like Pinewood, were still 4-track stereo format.
    The format for "Superman" was actually seven tracks. (Left, Baby boom left, Center, Baby boom Right, Right and Left and Right 'split' Surround). This format was used on two other productions, "Apocalypse Now" and "Supergirl". This format was altered to mono surround, six-tracks, and utilized on many productions throughout the eighties. Dolby Laboratories adapted this format for its Dolby Digital format which we know today as 5.1 (Baby boom left and right became the 'LFE .1' track. The original 6-track format, with 5 discrete stage channels and mono surround, that was utilized in the late fifties and early sixties on such productions as "Oklahoma!", "South Pacific", "Ben-Hur" etc., is virtually obsolete today.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Pickard View Post
    continued....."six tracks stereo dubbing", as quoted above, did not become a reality at Pinewood until 1978. Gordon K.MacCallum, chief dubbing mixer in Pinewood's Theater 2, mixed "Superman" in 'discrete' six-track as opposed to the standard 4-track stereo (Left, Center, Right and mono Surround) which he had started in 1961 with "El-Cid". Since then Pinewood has mixed many films in this stereo format. For example, the Bronston films ("55 Days at Peking", "Fall of the Roman Empire" and "Circus World" aka "Magnificent Showman"), "Zulu", "First Men in the Moon", "Battle of the Bulge", "Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines", "Khartoum", "Krakatoa", "Custer of the West", "Waterloo" and "Ryan's Daughter" just to name a few.
    Six-track discrete dubbing could only be done in Hollywood.
    In 1968, Producer Albert 'Cubby' Broccoli wanted a six-track mix for his film "Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang". Pinewood did some 'pre-mixing', but the film had to be shipped to Todd-AO sound department in Hollywood for its six-track mix (Left, Left 'extra', Center, Right 'extra', Right and mono surround).
    Pinewood's 4-track mixes that required a 6-track mix for 70mm 'roadshow' presentation utilized Technicolor's method of artificially creating a 'six-track printing master' for the magnetic striping of 70mm prints. In 1968, Shepperton installed six-track print-mastering for its production of "Oliver!". Their main mixes, like Pinewood, were still 4-track stereo format.
    The format for "Superman" was actually seven tracks. (Left, Baby boom left, Center, Baby boom Right, Right and Left and Right 'split' Surround). This format was used on two other productions, "Apocalypse Now" and "Supergirl". This format was altered to mono surround, six-tracks, and utilized on many productions throughout the eighties. Dolby Laboratories adapted this format for its Dolby Digital format which we know today as 5.1 (Baby boom left and right became the 'LFE .1' track. The original 6-track format, with 5 discrete stage channels and mono surround, that was utilized in the late fifties and early sixties on such productions as "Oklahoma!", "South Pacific", "Ben-Hur" etc., is virtually obsolete today.
    One correction to the above I would like to make is the exact configuration to "Superman"'s mix, it was split surround but the configuration is inaccurate for the stage channels, which I will research.

  4. #104
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    Briefly, the 'Superman' 6-track mix configuration was as follows
    "Channels 1,3, 5 (of the 6-track) carried the full frequency left, center and right screen information. Channel 6 carried the full frequency mono track. Tracks 2 and 4, in addition to the boom, respectively carried the left and right surround sound above 200Hz.

  5. #105
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  6. #106
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    "Diamonds are Forever" Call Sheets:



    ....More next week.

  7. #107
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  8. #108
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  9. #109
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Absolutely priceless stuff! Thank you, Stephen.

  10. #110
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    A call sheet for "On Her Majesty's Secret Service":


  11. #111
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    Stephen did you ever meet John Turk when he was working there? He worked mainly on the bond movies involving any scenes with boats. I know he worked on Moonraker at the studios, I went to school with his son who came back with all sorts of bits and bobs from the show. I also recently got married at Pinewood, two months ago.

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azanti View Post
    Stephen did you ever meet John Turk when he was working there? He worked mainly on the bond movies involving any scenes with boats. I know he worked on Moonraker at the studios, I went to school with his son who came back with all sorts of bits and bobs from the show. I also recently got married at Pinewood, two months ago.
    Hi Azanti, the name doesn't ring a bell. He probably came on the scene after I moved to the US in 1980.
    I looked him up on IMDB. The only credit listed was on "Elizabeth" as 'boat master'. I assume this is the right person.
    I can't think of a better place to get married outside of a church, congratulations.

  13. #113
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    Below, several items from the TV show, shot on 35mm film, "UP SHE GOES" (aka "FROM A BIRD'S EYE VIEW").
    First item is a cast and crew still taken in the car park at the front of J and K Stages:



    Can't remember all the names, but will give it a try:

    Front row (left to right): David Holmes(lighting cameraman); Millicent Martin; Director Ralph Levy; Patte Finley; Producer Jack Greenwood; Ron Fry.
    Second row: ? Doris Martin (with scarf)(continuity); ??? Jeff Seaholme (bearded) (camera operator); Charlie Wheeler (boom operator).
    Third row: Ron Purdie(first assistant director)(with mustache, on steps left of Jeff Seaholme); Nick LeMesurier (sound)(son of re-recording mixer Colin LeMesurier) (partially hidden behind Charlie Wheeler); With glasses and mustache, Sid Rider(production sound mixer).
    On steps, with glasses looking somewhat windswept, is Laurie Greenwood, brother of Jack.

    Two call sheets from the beginning of the shoot:



    Below is the cover of production mixer Jock May's personal script of the first episode. On the back are some of Jock's sound notes:



    Below I have reproduced comments I made, from another thread, about working on the series as a boom assistant:

    This was my first job in the Sound Department at Pinewood. I started there in August 1968 as a projectionist at the age of 20. I was told that it was next to impossible to make the transition into sound because of the trade union situation, NATKE (projectionists) and ACTT (film technicians), unless you had a relative in the business or if there were no ACTT members available for work. The only way was as a Trainee Boom Assistant. You didn't necessarily have to be a member of ACTT for this category. Fortunately there was nobody ahead of me to snag this job so I went down on my hands and knees to the Sound Department head, Cyril Crowhurst, to give me the break. Lucky for me it worked. In May, 1969 I started work on J & K Stages, which were only three years old, on "Up She Goes". The same day, Billy Wilder started shooting "Private Life of Sherlock Holmes" on the newly constructed 'Baker Street' set on the back lot. At lunch time I went on the set and chatted to the sound crew.

    "Up She Goes" was the original title of the series. The sound mixer was Jock May who was Hammer's main production mixer during their golden period at Bray. The Boom Operator was Charlie Wheeler. I was warned that he was a tough Union man to work for, but I got to like him a lot and he taught me a lot about the job.

    The leads, Millicent Martin, Patte Finley and Peter Jones were all very friendly. Likewise, Ralph Levy, who was a superb, experienced TV Director. Jeff Seaholme, famous for the Ealing Films, was our camera operator and I got along with him really well. Unfortunately, he had a falling out with the Director and was dismissed. I told him I was sorry to see him go and on his departure he gave me a whole pile of back issues of "Films and Filming" which I still have.

    At this time Nagra quarter-inch Swiss tape recorders were steadily taking over the British Film Industry as the standard for production sound recording. Since the introduction of magnetic film at the beginning of the 50's production sound was either recorded onto 17 1/2 or 35mm single stripe magnetic film. "Up She Goes" was recorded onto 35mm single stripe magnetic film. The audio was picked by a D-25 microphone onto a Fisher boom and was routed through a small 'floor' mixer and then sent to a small 'monitor' room located on the side of the sound stage.

    My job as 'Boom Assistant' was to come on to the stage in the morning at least an hour before the crew arrived and lay cables connecting the boom to the mixer and the monitor recording room and a cable from the mixer to the camera. This was a Mitchell 'blimped' BNC 35mm Camera, a beautiful looking camera very photogenic and was the standard camera in use at that time (the Panavision 35mm reflex camera was just introduced and made it's debut on "Private Life of Sherlock Holmes"). Next, I had to wheel the Fisher 'boom' (an instrument on two wheels with a platform to stand on and an arm that extended several feet and at the end of it was affixed the microphone. The operator could control with ease the position of the microphone over the actors by extending the arm and swivelling the microphone to the correct angle of the emitting speaking voice.) onto the stage from the sound department. This was a tricky task. The wheels were like small car tyres and could extend or contract to fit through narrow areas. They had to be extended when being transported to and from the stage. Every assistant had been the the harrowing experience of tipping the fragile boom over on it's side and I was no exception. One day upon leaving the stage I forgot to extend the wheels and when I went over the ramp underneath the large stage doors over it went. Fortunately I wasn't fired but the sound department were obviously not happy with me for days after. Jock May did not take a liking to me at all.

    Jock was the production mixer for Hammer at Bray. He used to come to work in a small boat down the River Thames to Bray Studios. Anybody who has been to the studio knows that the narrow strip of the Thames river runs through Windsor right by the studio. Presumably he drove a car to Pinewood as there is no convenient river close by. He never wore socks and bared a close resemblance to actor Noel Purcell.

    Part of my job was to listen for the 'local' phone which was attached to the side of the mixer. It's major function was to signal to the recordist in the monitor room when to start the recorder. This was done by pressing a button on the phone once, Jock would then wait for two 'beeps' and this would indicate that the recorder was up to 'speed'. He would then motion to the assistant director, Ron Purdie, that the sound crew were ready and then camera crew could commence shooting.

    On one occasion I missed the phone ringing when talking to somebody which annoyed Jock greatly and as a result told me that I should find a job but to stay out of the sound department. Well fortunately, this didn't materialise as here I am forty years later still working in the sound department!

    Another chore I had as a boom assistant was as a 'grip'. When actors walk from position a to b, which could be any distance, the camera and often the boom has to follow (track). This procedure was not easy. I had to first observe the position of the camera, which was on a 'dolly' a four-wheeled 'transport' which supports the heavy camera. The camera 'grip' can move forward, backward or sharply from side to side by simply turning the steering column handle. Camera tape or chalk marks are placed on the floor as a guide to actors and technicians showing where the camera will move. I then had to follow the camera and make sure I knew when the camera dolly was going to stop so I didn't bump into it. I recall at least once this happened. My wheels bumped into the camera dolly which sent a vibration through to the camera. The camera operator, observing the action through the viewfinder immediately called 'cut' when he felt the sharp movement.

    I was on the series from May until August ('69). This was before the completion of the series and I thought I had been fired. Fortunately I was just re-assigned.

  14. #114
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    Correction: Script illustration is Episode two, not one which is "Wife Trouble".

  15. #115
    Senior Member Country: New Zealand Anthony McKay's Avatar
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    Thanks once again - I've just watched the series and only spotted one 'out of studio' location in the whole series, in the episode The Sicilian Affair which also uses the 'Finders Keepers' set.



    As luck would have it this is a popular Pinewood location that I've been unable to trace. Seen in 'The Zoo Gang'



    ..and as a model in 'Man in a Suitcase'


  16. #116
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain mariocki's Avatar
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    Tony - I've got a theory on this one so if you've got any other images from any of the series they'd be appreciated.

  17. #117
    Senior Member Country: New Zealand Anthony McKay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mariocki View Post
    Tony - I've got a theory on this one so if you've got any other images from any of the series they'd be appreciated.
    All my best shots are here:

    http://avengerland.theavengers.tv/spotting/spot21.htm

  18. #118
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain mariocki's Avatar
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    I've looked at those but could do with any that might show more of the grounds.

  19. #119
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    Absolutely brilliant to read your account of working on S:1999 Stephen! A billion and one questions come to mind :-)

  20. #120
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    Thank you Scatta.....ask away!!

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