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  1. #2301
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Alternative shot from 'The Angry Silence' (1960)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    I think that could be Charles Rayford on the right wearing the hat, cornershop.
    Here is a better view of him, Gerald (not so much Michael Craig).



    With Ted Carroll, left, and a young Michael Wynne.

    His face seems a good match to the Porter in your screencap from Scotland Yard - The Never Never Murder (1961):



    With Russell Napier (who was also in The Angry Silence), left, and Maurice Good. I think you're right with Charles Rayford.
    Last edited by cornershop15; 30-08-13 at 01:44 PM. Reason: New page.

  2. #2302
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Yes, thanks, cornershop, it's definitely Charles Rayford, whose C.V. is filling out quite considerably.

  3. #2303
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    In that case, very well spotted with the first capture. Going back to the Scotland Yard series, this was yet another purchase from Network's Sale last month. So far, I've seen four of the films. The last one was The Blazing Caravan, starring Alexander Gauge in a very different role from Friar Tuck. He reminded me of Laird Cregar. Also interesting to see Victor Platt and Hilda Barry as a married couple. I first noticed them in episodes of The Prisoner.

    I fear we'll never know most of the uncredited actors in this series. It's difficult enough with those who are, but aren't given a determined role.

  4. #2304
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Off to the exotic vistas of Blackpool and Llandudno during Hindle Wakes (1952), and who do we see there but:


    Neil Hallett not exactly setting the ballroom on fire with Lisa Daniely


    Herbert (Patrick Jordan) isn't having much luck either

    And madam, that's a bit of an overreaction upon sighting Blackpool during your boat trip. Arthur Howell looks far more stoic and I'm pretty sure that's Pat Halpin top left too.

  5. #2305
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Arthur Howell continues to get his "Harassed Man" credit when there are more "Variations of a Million Bucks", i.e. Part Two of a pretty dreary tale of MAN IN A SUITCASE. However, just to properly finish off Part One:


    Here's Jeremy Wilkin on the Pinewood lot, standing in for the London Docks, looking none too happy about being left out of the credits. However, his more substantial appearances in Part Two as American agent Manny give him the reward of a screen credit


    Making sure Richard Bradford's right side is up is Greek seaman Yuri Borienko


    And I think receiving the right side is Andrew Andreas


    When Richard gets lost on the Pinewood backlot, thankfully the episode's hair stylist Frieda Steiger sends her husband Fred Peck to show him the way.

    And just to illustrate a bit of dodgy continuity that ties things up rather oddly:

    The tie Gay Hamilton is about to hand an oversized McGill can be seen earlier in the episode worn by Ron Randell in one scene and Simon Brent in another. It's a bit of a repeat of the Universal tie situation: the same tie is worn by Arthur Margetson in Sherlock Holmes Faces Death, by Holmes himself in The Spider Woman and also by Robert Paige in Son of Dracula, all made within a few months of each other in 1943.

  6. #2306
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    There's a small cast staying at the Small Hotel back in 1957, but among them:


    The young lady in the centre, playing Rosemary, who I think must be Dorothy Bromiley. Another "DB" as "R" is her beau is Derek Blomfield, playing Roland, and at their service is Albert, the superb Gordon Harker


    At the end of the film, The Yanks Are Coming, and leading the charge, resembling a slightly smaller George Woodridge, is a cigar-chomping George Hilsdon, watched gleefully by Albert, Francis Matthews and Janet Munro.

    IMDb claims Dora Bryan is in the film, but she is not a resident of this hotel.

  7. #2307
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "Man from the Dead" isn't MAN IN A SUITCASE - it fact it's Sergeant Cork himself - but it is the first episode filmed of the series and Richard Bradford actually smiles a couple of times. Anyway, People not from the Credits:


    Newspaper seller Harry Phipps gets the first interaction with McGill outside White City Underground Station


    Timothy Bateson looks happy about the prospect of getting a meal in this transport caf�, though Jim Brady seems more interested with his hand of cards


    When McGill summons Rachel Thyssen from kindergarten duties, headteacher "Duchess" Aileen Lewis doesn't appear too amused. Aileen at last gets a line, very indignantly uttered: "Miss Thyssen!"

    The finale takes place at Crystal Palace Stadium I believe. The episode credits quire a few of the stuntmen: Gerry Wain, Arthur Howell again and even Fred Haggerty. Also in the heavy brigade:


    Bearded David Nettheim comes forward, with Bernard Barnsley and Maxwell Craig 4th and 2nd right


    Duffed up McGill is surrounded, and as well as bowler hatted Arthur Howell, there's Hugh Elton in a snazzy pork pie number at the back.

  8. #2308
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Davy (1957) is a vehicle for Harry Secombe, but sadly it doesn't really pass its MOT, as the film is rather poor in all departments. Looking through the mechanics of it:


    As Harry leads Susan Shaw and other members of his troupe to the wings of the theatre, the chap in bottle green facing us looks like the gentleman MovieDude has identified as Austin Cooper


    A big extra call at Collins Music Hall, though the only one I can just make out, end of third row, is Dido Plumb. The same audience is present for a later performance at the end of the film and yes, Dido does smile and laugh


    The amused stagehand on the right is Frank Atkinson, who's given some cloyingly sentimental lines to say


    The unamused manager in the middle is Bill Fraser, who's given no screen credit despite being a well-known name by 1957


    When Harry takes his nephew Peter Frampton to the Royal Opera House Covent Garden, they pass a blurry Victor Harrington, making his way out. When they leave later, Victor can be seen again making his way back in!


    On the Royal Opera House stage is, er, stage manager Roger Avon (looking like Guy Standeven minus pipe). In the stalls are Alexander Knox, Isabel Dean and Adele Leigh


    And when Peter Frampton gets lost backstage, he almost runs into Lola Morice (or not her, as the case may be). Peter is not THE Peter Frampton, but the son of the film's make up man Harry Frampton. I think Peter is dubbed on two or three occasions by Olive Gregg, but otherwise we hear his own voice. The singing of Adele Leigh and Harry Secombe is not dubbed . . .

    The waitresses we encounter in the Opera House are a fine trio played by Gladys Henson, Joan Sims and Liz Fraser, still billed as "Elizabeth Fraser" and Bernard Cribbins appears too as the uncredited music hall ASM.

  9. #2309
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I would say that is Lola Morice in "Davy" Gerald, with high cheekbones and downward facing nose. In the "Her name is Lola...' thread i said i thought the lady in the brown coat was'nt Lola Morice or Frances Baker, as you said Michael Stevenson called her Lola..., i was speculating she might be a different Lola i.e. Lola Rand or Lola Tarrant (cornershop has ruled out Lola Willard).

  10. #2310
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Ah, sorry, I think then I may have caused a misunderstanding over the name "Lola", philly. When Michael Stevenson first identified the woman we now believe/know to be Lola Morice, he could only remember her as "Lola", and couldn't recall her surname. It was subsequent research by you and others I think that uncovered the Morice surname. Michael never suggested the lady in the brown coat was Lola Morice or any other Lola, nor in fact was it he who suggested Frances Baker. Apologies for any mix-up on the Lola front that may have been down to me.

  11. #2311
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Chasing shadows in Chase a Crooked Shadow (1957):

    It is very difficult to be sure, but I have a fair idea that the card player not wearing braces in the background with Herbert Lom is Herbert's stand-in Emil Stemmler.

  12. #2312
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    Jim Brady again this time from Devils of Darkness 1965, where he plays a gravedigger and gets to do a bit of 'acting' as he is bumped of by a pair of gloves..actually Hubert Noel's effete vampire Count Sinistre.

    Jim Brady Devils of darkness.JPG

  13. #2313
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Another bit of acting in MAN IN A SUITCASE for Peter Brace, whose acting isn't an "Essay in Evil", but he does seem to be dubbed throughout:


    At least Peter gets a credit, a fight with Richard Bradford and here, a beaming smile from lovely Glendure Hotel receptionist Jean, played by Angela Lovell. Meanwhile, the guest at the back looks like Jack Armstrong.

  14. #2314
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Michael Goldie

    Sorry to report that Michael, a former subject here, died last week (27th August), aged 86. He is on the right in Gerald's
    capture from the Gideon's Way episode How to Retire Without Really Working (1964). With Joyce Grant and Eric Barker:



    I mainly remember Michael from Randall and Hopkirk (Deceased), where I first saw him, and a recurring role in the Children's series Smith.

    R.I.P.

  15. #2315
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    For MAN IN A SUITCASE, it might be "The Girl Who Never Was", but here we have the man who often is:


    "elderly patient being assisted by attractive nurse". Crafty old George Spence.

  16. #2316
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Son of Robin Hood (1958) isn't all that it cracks up to be, and I don't just mean the title, but at least we get to see some veterans of other more successful flings in the greenwood:

    The Merry Men aren't living up to their name here, despite Jim Brady being all decked out in Will Scarlett's attire. That's Will next to him (in green ) played by Jack Lambert and George Coulouris is a character IMDb calls "Alan A. Dale"

    When the battle's on, trust Marius Goring to ponce about in his fancy dress. He's going to regret that. Not so easy to see in his drabber clothes, but loading his bow in the foreground is Ernie Rice

    All hail the son of Robin Hood, encourages Little John (George Woodbridge), but instead here we have June Laverick and Al (David) Hedison plus raising his tankard and dressed in his fetching blue ruff is Alf Mangan. And on the far right . . .

    . . . a better view now of that very Merry Man, Dido Plumb

    "Remember to punctuate properly" urges Duke David Farrar to his scribe, who looks like a bearded Peter Rendall

    Failure to punctuate or dress sensibly ends you up in the Duke's torture chamber, as Marius discovers. Bill Cummings behind him is hardly dressed at all

    Castle guard George Hilsdon looks bemused as the Duke studies his contract and wonders why his agent got him the film in the first place

    Another guard on the right here is Charlie Price, and he must be thinking it'd be a good move to change sides - and lo, a few scenes later, Charlie's one of the Merry Men! Humphrey Lestocq is bolting the cell door and he must be thinking thank God the bird of prey he's had to nervously carry throughout the blessed film hasn't done him a mischief

    Marius, it's the Merry Men, not the Gay Men; oh well, at least it's all over and Eddie Powell has turned up on the right to wonder why the fight scenes have been so lacklustre. The two Georges wonder if they can just leave it up to Archie Duncan and Richard Coleman from now on.

  17. #2317
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Thanks for watching it so I don't have to!

  18. #2318
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "All that Glitters" for MAN IN A SUITCASE is the many familiar uncredited faces in the episode:


    This policeman I think is Bernard Barnsley and I recall cornershop may have previously posted a similar view of him in the "Who are these Policemen?" thread


    Barbara Shelley is entertaining, indeed she is, and Ned Lynch on the right is naturally appreciative


    Her reception guests also include Juba Kennerley and our new named regular, Mabel Etherington


    A nice view here of Barbara and her beau, Michael Goodliffe, plus Edward Underdown, Juba and also Tony Mendleson

    The plot then takes us to the village of Norton, and blimey, it must be where all the extras lived when they were resting. We get Dickie Owen, Kevin Stoney and:

    Duncan Lamont plus that mystery man from THE PRISONER, Eric Kent and Jim Brady . . .


    . . . then down the pub, Alf Mangan (hidden in the previous picture, but he gets the character name of "Joe") makes a dramatic entrance and Jim Tyson is on the blower (and he almost comes to blows with Richard Bradford. Unlike a previous episode, Richard doesn't have a fag in his mouth all the way through a fist fight in this one). Unsurprisingly, Jim Brady is also in this pub scene.

  19. #2319
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Where there's beer, there's George Spence. Here enthralled by the sea stories of two sailors named Attenborough and Lee in The Gift Horse (1952).



    Providing musical accompaniment for the inevitable pub brawl is busker Jack May (the elder).



    I'm pretty sure Jim Brady is in the bar fight, but can't get a clear enough view of him.

  20. #2320
    Banned Country: UK
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    No idea how to do screen caps, so no image sorry, but I was watching The Nanny the other day and spotted, I think, Jim Tyson in the opening credits as a flower seller with Bette Davis.

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