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  1. #2821
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "And Suddenly You're Dead" is not what happens when you watch the next episode of THE BARON, but I suppose it's entirely possible. This epic is written by both Terry Nation and Dennis Spooner and features an incredible guest villain appearance by Kay Walsh, who outdoes her stint in The Witches by chewing every bit of scenery Elstree could manufacture while narrowing her eyes and adopting the dodgiest accent this side of 'ALLO 'ALLO!. Meanwhile, at the Park Hotel:


    Steve Forrest wanders aimlessly about, ignores Frances Baker and doesn't even ask that bloke what his real name is


    Waiter Emil Stemmler tries to slip Steve his lines while Jerry Stovin gets his money out to bribe Emil into silence. It doesn't work: Emil gets undubbed lines


    Not even fellow waiter Martin Lyder will shop Emil, despite Sue Lloyd's best efforts to bring some emotion into Steve's face. Martin also gets undubbed lines


    And a hat-trick for the undubbed: hooray, even mortuary attendant Fred Woods gets to speak! In fact, his accent is clearer than good old George Pravda's


    Steve 'n' Sue are never away from that table. It looks like Hein Viljoen is stepping in to join them, but no lines for him


    Finally, that suave Frenchman-about-Ville Arthur Goodman he-honks his horn, but he gets no assistance. Arthur's on view earlier in the episode in the first Park Hotel sequence.

  2. #2822
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    There's not a large cast in The Servant (1963), but we can serve up the following nevertheless:


    Although James Fox and Wendy Craig ignore Johnny Dankworth's fine music, Ken Hutchins gets into the dancing regardless


    Aileen Lewis enjoys her lunch despite the typical Harold Pinter backchat around her. The waiter in the background I'm sure is Paddy Smith, while the head waiter serving Wendy and James is Derek Tansley


    Wendy and James may be reading the script, though they look too jolly for that, and the bald head on the left behind them I think belongs to Peter Rendall. The other chap in the next booth is another of our frequent unknowns


    Bogarde fans don't despair, I am including him here, well, his back anyway. But this screencap is really to indicate I believe the taxi driver is Ernie Rice.

  3. #2823
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    One of several non Wallace films included in the Edgar Wallace set from Network, Breakout (1959) is one of the better ones starring wooden Canadian actor Lee Patterson, bright spot though is Billie Whitelaw who plays his wife. A large cast of speaking roles but disappointingly only ten credits and no attributions, i have listed the known credits below, also seen are Moviedude Unknown Male 17 in the pub along with MUM 37(T'old codger) also Moviedude Unknown Female15 in the cafe. I have'nt listed Fred Woods who may be one of the prisoners who unload the van. Three character parts are still sadly unidentified, Lee Patterson's boss Mr Camkin ?, the posh gent in the pub and the senior prison guard who rides in the van with Lee Patterson, i would love to know who they are.
    Key: Lee Patterson to Lloyd Lamble (onscreen credits) George Bishop to Tom Naylor ( David Quinlan's British Sound Films), Joby Blanshard to Glyn Houston (IMDb), John Colin to Bernard Horsfall (Britmovie- Gerald Lovell) the final three i have added from the discoveries found in the Extras forum from the last two years. Attributions are from Denis Gifford's British Film Catalogue, IMDb and Gerald Lovell i have added a few first names from the film soundtrack and two extra roles for Aidan Harrington.

    BREAKOUT (62) (U)
    Independant Artists (AA)
    Producer - Julian Wintle. Leslie Parkyn
    Director - Peter Graham Scott
    Story - (Book) Frederick Oughton
    Screenplay - Peter Barnes

    Lee Patterson - George Munro
    Hazel Court - Rita Arkwright
    William Lucas - Frank Chandler
    John Paul - Arkwright
    Terence Alexander - Steven Farrow
    Billie Whitelaw - Rose Munro
    Dermot Kelly - O'Quinn
    Estelle Brody - Maureen O'Quinn
    Rupert Davies - Morgan
    Lloyd Lamble - Inspector
    George Bishop - Judge
    Robert Cawdron - Prison Library Guard
    George Woodbridge - Charlie, Landlord
    Neil McCarthy - Powers
    Alene Daniels - Secretary
    Robert McBain - Phil, Pilot
    Benny Nightingale - Sam, Mechanic
    Tom Naylor - Joe Woolard
    Joby Blanshard - Prison Gate Guard
    Leonard Fenton - Fred, Prison Gate Guard
    Glyn Houston - Man in Pub
    John Colin - Joe, Bartender
    Jim Brady - Pub Patron
    Ernie Rice - Man Unloading Van
    Vic Chapman - Office Worker
    John Tatum - Prison Kitchen Guard
    Aidan Harrington - Prison Gate Guard, Man Exiting Toilet Near Left Luggage Office, Constable
    Bernard Horsfall - Police Sergeant
    Harry Phipps - Pub Patron
    Charles Rayford - Thug who Pushes Bag of Flour on Tom Naylor
    Emil Stemmler - Prison Chef
    Last edited by philly; 25-02-14 at 11:40 PM.

  4. #2824
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The senior prison guard looks rather like Peter Elliott, philly, but I don't think it's him.

    I also have Jessie Robins down as a woman in the caf� and Jack Rodney playing another thug called Fred.

  5. #2825
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Thanks Gerald, i wonder if 'Fred' is an adlib, the first prison scene the guard shouts "Open the gate Fred" but we can't see his face, later the same shout goes out but this time we see that it is Leonard Fenton , of course that's no guarantee that he was the guard in the first scene, if you see what i mean !
    Last edited by philly; 26-02-14 at 04:29 PM. Reason: Wrong actor

  6. #2826
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Jack Rodney as Fred is in the Neil McCarthy scene and sticks his head out the car window at one point.

  7. #2827
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Masters also in their prime in The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1968):


    We've hardly started and Guy Standeven is belting out a hymn. Helpfully the titles tell us who are the two ladies in front


    At school dinners, Gordon Jackson wonders how much longer he has to listen to the cuss words of the Squire of Effingham himself, Reg Thomason


    Not a very realistic staffroom - where is all the fag smoke?? As Maggie Smith is grabbed by Gordon, the out-of-focus master at the back is certainly Peter Evans.

    Roger, I think this is yet another one of yours. I presume the Guy, Reg and Peter scenes were filmed at Pinewood.

    Although I was at school in Edinburgh when the film was made, I have no recollections of the filming.

  8. #2828
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Yes Gerald another one of mine.
    That's Joyce Maloney (Mrs Roy Everson) back left.

    We shot for 3 weeks in Edinbugh and 9 weeks at Pinewood

  9. #2829
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Just a few captures of Fred Woods from Steptoe and Son Rides again.


    1 copy.jpgUntitled-14 copy.jpg

  10. #2830
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Caramba, it's South American George (1941) and 'ee by gum, it's also:


    A very young Pat Ryan as Reg wanting to stop George Formby from singing "Barmaid at the Rose & Crown"


    It's enough to make your hair go curly, thanks to Ben Williams


    Among those trying to turn George South American are Felix Aylmer and, I think, Jack McNaughton


    Doctors are called to assess the condition and the one on the left is Roddy Hughes


    Impresario Gud McNaughton has a doubtful Jacques Brown and a hirsute Charles Rayford to impress


    Taxi, sir? A small fare for Frank Atkinson on this film


    Don't throw that switch, Linden Travers, it'll blow George Spence to atoms.

    Then onto the credited but unattributed roles:


    Muriel George as the theatrical Aunt Mabel Bannerman to Formby, George


    Cameron Hall as the stage manager who must be obeyed


    And Norman Pierce as the superintendent who must be shocked.

  11. #2831
    Senior Member Country: England harryfielder's Avatar
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    Great pics.....Aitch,,

  12. #2832
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Wartime trauma in Ealing's Convoy (1940) and at the planning meeting:


    The chaps are briefed by Brook - stiff old Clive leans back and actually gets to call another officer "young fellow, m'lad", not quite as stiff John Clements and really rather relaxed Harold Warrender, plus I'm pretty sure at the back in the centre, it's Ned Lynch. The ears on the officer on the right tell me it's Alec Clunes


    Under fire, but still calm is Cap'n Baines himself, here as a gunnery lieutenant, Howard Lang.

  13. #2833
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I suppose the folks in these pictures are Much Too Shy to have their names credited in 1942:


    It's not on his list, but the art student on the left who doesn't think much of George Formby's efforts could well be Harold Coyne.

    And the unattributed roles:


    Percy Walsh as a disgusted French professor


    Noel Dainton and Clifford Buckton who take a different view of George's efforts. Could that be Michael Ward on the right?


    And Judith Nelmes as Mrs. Roy and Eleanor Hallam as Mrs. Ellison who take the opposing opinion.

  14. #2834
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In A Prize of Arms (1961), there are plenty of military types played by the likes of Tom Adams, Michael Collins, Fulton Mackay and William Marlowe, but I wasn't able to spot them. However:


    The ones here include John Westbrook on the left and Rio Fanning in the beret - he gets a credit despite getting next to nothing to do, but with no role attribution


    At The Woodman pub, Sergeant John Rees gets a fly pint courtesy of the landlord John Barrett.

  15. #2835
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Let's get cracking with Get Cracking (1943), a reasonably cracking George Formby Home Guard comedy. In its opening moments:


    In this family scene, as Anthony Eden announces, it looks like Grace Arnold mothers


    During this wipe, we get a view of one of the Major Wallop men who appears throughout the film, particularly in a commando scene late on in the film. I think it's a fairly young Jack Sharp. Also in his platoon is Ben Williams (not shown)


    The Minor Wallop platoon, which includes our hero plus Edward Rigby, Wally Patch and Mike Johnson, also has the blurred Jack May in its ranks


    Trouble in store (no, that's a Norman Wisdom film ) for George as his rival Ronald Shiner pitches up with the long arm (a Jack Hawkins film ) of P.C. Punter, alias Jack Vyvian, I think


    The war games (hell, a DOCTOR WHO story now ) are adjudicated by this officer, who I believe is Noel Dainton once more.

  16. #2836
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In standing up to "The Legions of Ammak", THE BARON has two Peter Wyngardes to face, and for some reason Peter is initially obviously dubbed with his own posher voice in one of his roles. John Llewellyn Moxey directed with some nice close-ups; any thoughts, John, or was it down to Monty Berman's stopwatch?? It's nice, though, to see Jim Bolton get an onscreen credit. Anyway, at the start there's some location filming in central London interspersed with Elstree backlot material and it gets quite dizzy:


    George Murcell is the miserly billionaire in the centre of the picture and Arthur Goodman and his blue raincoat make the first of several appearances in this episode. He also appears minus coat in a nightclub scene. You can tell son Johnny was working well for dad . . .


    When we switch to the backlot, Fred Machon is speeding up on the inside of George . . .


    . . . a glance back, but as George falters, Victor Harrington overtakes, closely followed by Frances Baker . . .


    . . . and goodness me, a newspaper flies up to distract George as John Tatum speedily advances from the opposite direction . . .


    . . . and then a short burst by Hyma Beckley as George disappears behind a lamppost . . .


    . . . and on the home stretch, he's blowing out smoke from a fag rather than a pipe, but it's Ernie Rice who takes the tape. Phew!

    (With apologies to Peter O'Sullevan).
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 02-03-14 at 09:21 PM.

  17. #2837
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    It's a bit more civilised when Peter Wyngarde in Michael Morris's make-up pitches up at the Sirocco Club. The doorman Jack Arrow not only gets lines but a name: Leonard


    In the club, well, hopefully only literally, Sirocco herself (Valli Newby) does her stuff. I don't tend to be a great Derek Chafer spotter, but isn't that he far left? Goodman, Sr. makes his appearance too with a young lady


    Another naughty old nightclub patron on the left is Pat Halpin


    Buttocks clenched, Romo Gorrara takes his instructions from King Peter


    King P meets George M, courtesy of a face-cracking Steve Forrest. Past the forest, the pilot is Terry Mountain.

    Now for the interesting - and frustrating - bit. Spotlight is consulted by Paul Ferris in the course of the plot. The likes of Anthony Morton and Bryan Mosley are on display, plus:


    These chaps (including the fake Ronald Noyes/Peter W entry), but:


    Bloody hell, we don't see the name of the most wanted top left. It's an old pic of Bill Westley unless that's nephew of the original/Diana Rigg double/AD?

  18. #2838
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Looks like top left could be George Oliver.

  19. #2839
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I thought it was more likely to be MovieDude's Unknown male 90, Dave:


  20. #2840
    Senior Member Country: New Zealand Anthony McKay's Avatar
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    I noticed all these stills were taken on the ABPC backlot.

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