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  1. #2841
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    I thought it was more likely to be MovieDude's Unknown male 90, Dave:
    Absolutely right--now I have to track down a 1964 or 1965 Spotlight!

  2. #2842
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    Three Cases of Murder (1955) has its share of extras:


    The second segment of the omnibus, "You Killed Elizabeth," finds Emrys Jones bored with the concert and passing Victor Harrington as he goes out for a smoke.


    On the dance floor, John Gregson cuts a rug with Elizabeth Sellars. Also cutting is Richard Gregory. Could his dance partner be Frances Baker? Eden Fox can also be breifly glimpsed as both a bartender and waiter in this segment.


    When Jones goes to the "Rose and Crown" to collect a drunken Gregson, one of the departing customers looks to be Eddie Boyce.
    Last edited by Screencap72; 04-03-14 at 04:24 AM.

  3. #2843
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    The third and final segment, "Lord Mountdrago" finds Orson Welles and Alan Badel engaged in a duel of overacting which leaves nothing unscathed. The Parliament is full of familar faces, including many of Movie Dude's older Unknown Males.


    Also there is good ol' Wally Bosco.


    While at Lord & Lady Connemara's ball, Victor Harrington pops in again, expertly dipping into frame to take Orson Welles' coat.


    Also at the ball is that guy who Steve Forrest was too busy being dull to ask after.


    and Pat Hagan, having a chuckle at the fact Orson forgot his pants (this is a dream sequence, after all).


    Mabel Etherington proves she's not above a chuckle at a wardrobe malfunction, either.


    I think the monocled personage next to Alan Badel could be John Dunbar.

    In one of his later nightmares, Welles suddenly deviates from his speech and begins singing "Daisy Bell," whereupon the entire House of Commons (well, at least the opposition) joins in! Really a rather amazing bit, and predates 2001 by some 13 years! I wonder if Kubrick remembered this scene?


    And Victor makes a third appearance as one of the laughing opposition. That gurner that Gerald pointed out some time ago is to Victor's right.
    Last edited by Screencap72; 04-03-14 at 05:32 AM.

  4. #2844
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    I'm rather more convinced the lady on the right in Welles' dream dance sequence is indeed Frances Baker.


    The man in the goofy party hat at left looks like Philip Stewart; perhaps he is confused to see Zena Marshall as a blonde?


    The constable at right reminds me of John Arnatt, or maybe it's just the mustache?

  5. #2845
    Senior Member Country: New Zealand Anthony McKay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screencap72 View Post
    Absolutely right--now I have to track down a 1964 or 1965 Spotlight!
    No you don't - the page is faked and the photos are pasted in and were all taken on the same day at the ABPC backlot.

  6. #2846
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screencap72 View Post



    Mabel Etherington proves she's not above a chuckle at a wardrobe malfunction, either.



    And Victor makes a third appearance as one of the laughing opposition. That gurner that Gerald pointed out some time ago is to Victor's right.
    I agree it's Frances Baker, Dave, though not sure about Philip Stewart and definitely not John Arnatt. Behind Mabel, the large laugher looks to be Ned Hood.

    I'm not sure that last one is Victor. I've seen before a chubbier-faced chap whose eyes are similiar to Vic's (in The Cracksman for example), but he's not the man himself, but a Harrington ringer.

  7. #2847
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In Nine Men (1942), one man who is not one of the nine is Fred Griffiths, who IMDb has down as "base sergeant", but in fact he plays a mouthy recruit.

  8. #2848
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    It's moderately amusing so it's not rock bottom George but Bell-Bottom George (1944) and at the Senior Service Club (no smoking??):


    The stewards include George Formby and Mike Johnson. Mike Johnson Jnr. is an assistant director on the film, maybe the elderly chap's son?


    George finds he's in a "B" Mess already, courtesy of Jack Vyvian, I believe


    George's singing of "It Serves You Right" seems to serve the entertainment requirements of Noel Dainton


    And cutting to the chase, Hugh Dempster, Charles Farrell and Dennis Wyndham seem to be joined by young and impassive boatman Steve Donahue.

  9. #2849
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    I agree it's Frances Baker, Dave, though not sure about Philip Stewart and definitely not John Arnatt. Behind Mabel, the large laugher looks to be Ned Hood.

    I'm not sure that last one is Victor. I've seen before a chubbier-faced chap whose eyes are similiar to Vic's (in The Cracksman for example), but he's not the man himself, but a Harrington ringer.
    Think you are right on Ned Hood--haven't seen him often. Don't know what I was thinking about that copper being Arnatt, though! Have seen him before, playing a cop, too. You might be right about the Victor ringer. I wasn't sure at first, and looking back, now think he is the ringer as you said. Why do all these extras have doubles?

  10. #2850
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In He Snoops to Conquer (1944), we snoop to find:


    The fellow lodger of George Formby at Ma Goosen's (Katie Johnson) who manages to turn his face to the camera is that good old pro Jack May


    And when George takes joins the cabinet in the town council and slings it over his shoulder, George Spence is there to watch. Jack May's also in this scene and gets to shout out a line to George.

  11. #2851
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screencap72 View Post
    Think you are right on Ned Hood--haven't seen him often. Don't know what I was thinking about that copper being Arnatt, though! Have seen him before, playing a cop, too. You might be right about the Victor ringer. I wasn't sure at first, and looking back, now think he is the ringer as you said. Why do all these extras have doubles?
    I think Harrington Ringer is just to our right of Charlie Drake here in The Cracksman (1963), Dave:


    Ironically, Ned Hood can be glimpsed on the left behind Charlie, plus we get Nyree Dawn Porter and Patrick Cargill. Jack Arrow is also in this scene.

  12. #2852
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Rolling out the garden roller in Dear Mr. Prohack (1949) is Jack Sharp. Hidden on the left is Bryan Forbes and on the right is Dear himself, Cecil Parker.

  13. #2853
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I Didn't Do It, but here they are just the same:


    Ian Fleming has to gulp down his drink as George Formby warbles "The Daring Young Man" and looks like it could be a 1945-style John More above them


    Carl Jaffe looks positively eerie here and Mabel Etherington positively empyrean behind him.

  14. #2854
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    I'm glad all these familiar extras survived the onslaught of George Formby...
    One more from Three Cases:


    The tall MP on the left in Vera Pearce's chorus line is certainly Robin Burns.

  15. #2855
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Rumbustious and rollicking overacting here from no less a thesp than Jack Hawkins in Lorna Doone (1934).

  16. #2856
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    George in Civvy Street (1946) is George Formby's film swansong, and should really be called George in Country Pub, but swanning about with him:


    He may be getting demobbed, but George wants to sign tailor Harry Locke to a contract


    Three cheers: Pat Ryan is back in a George Formby film


    And he's joined by Harold Sanderson, and it looks like Lyn Evans too


    And while the local magistrates don't look too impressed, Gerry Judge is enthusiastic about Daphne Elphinstone's unexpected striptease


    Roddy Hughes as Mr. Fishby brings George's motion picture career to a financially sound conclusion. Cheers!

  17. #2857
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Calling the names in Calling the Tune (1936) maybe:


    Untying is George Robey and ready to record is Charles Lloyd-Pack


    Looking very pleased with himself is Sam Livesey and could his sycophantic aide be a 25 year old George Benson?

  18. #2858
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    Calling the names in Calling the Tune (1936) maybe:


    Untying is George Robey and ready to record is Charles Lloyd-Pack


    Looking very pleased with himself is Sam Livesey and could his sycophantic aide be a 25 year old George Benson?
    An additional tune to call . . .


    Dennis Arundell on the right as a gossiping diner.

  19. #2859
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Return to Yesterday (1940) is a pretty boring title for a pretty boring concept that is however played out rather well. Involved in the returning:


    The concerned Hollywood producer on the left is Hartley Power and I believe his assistant Rendall is the later director Peter Glenville


    IMDb has Bruce Seton down as an uncredited journalist, but I think it's a mistake for Cyril Chamberlain (also listed on IMDb as simply "Bit Part"). Here Cyril meets Garry Marsh for a scoop on Clive Brook (as if that was ever possible).

  20. #2860
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    Champions (1984)
    Screen captures showing Fred Wood (shaun of most of his hair) behind John Hurt

    Untitled-2 copy.jpgUntitled-2 copy.jpg

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