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  1. #3321
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In Madeleine (1950), Smith of that ilk, Ann Todd has a right old time with Ivan Desny, Norman Wooland and her dad Leslie Banks, and when the Smiths inspect their new home:


    Campbell, the agent providing the viewing is George Benson, here with Barbara Everest and Patricia Raine as well as old Les. IMDb think George is a chemist, but see later


    The pipers are coming; in fact, they already have, and announcing the birl which is to follow is Rufus Cruikshank (again see later)


    Not happy about the dance is M. Desny, who's on his way out. Staying to watch it, though, is Aileen Lewis


    On that chemist matter, here he is, Cameron Hall, I think, who IMDb has down for another role. The customer is Douglas Barr and the assistant is Anthony Newley


    Outside a Glasgow railway station, my nose, or rather his nose, tells me the workie on the left is Reg Thomason


    When Maddy goes home, lying in wait for her is Constable Ned Lynch


    And as John Laurie does his trademark rant, among the many faces looking at him, I see Wallace Bosco top left.

  2. #3322
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    That Rufus Cruikshank connection now . . .


    The witness room at the High Court of Justiciary in Edinburgh. Here we see Eugene Deckers, Ivor Barnard, Edward Chapman, Norman Wooland, Susan Stranks, Elizabeth Sellars, Kynaston Reeves, Douglas Barr and that other Little John, Archie Duncan. His voice clinches it


    Madeleine herself and some of the many oglers and hangers-on. Hyma Beckley somehow manages to get his head above the throng top left and bottom right, is that not George Leech scribbling away?


    IMDb has Jack Vyvian down as a policeman, but he's in fact a juror, along with Frederick Kelsey, who are currently listening to the submission of Lord Advocate Barry Jones. The jury foreman hidden by Barry is Russell Waters


    Mr. and Mrs. Smith have a new maid called Jean (not Aggie!) and it's Molly Weir


    It's the turn of Andr� Morell to have his say and head peeping out top left is the still dark-haired Harold Coyne.

  3. #3323
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I hope Juliet Mills is not a Nurse on Wheels after downing a few with Ronald Howard in this village hostelry in 1963:


    The barman seems to be Gerald Paris, and when he moves back . . .


    A tippling Aileen Lewis hoves into view. No sign of her hubby, though.

  4. #3324
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    No dummies in cars are discovered when we go out to dig for "The Treasure of the Costa del Sol" in DEPARTMENT S, but we do still get a puzzled motorcycle cop before the main titles:


    This time it's the more rugged visage of Jeff Silk


    Peter Wyngarde has the "task" of interviewing 51 lady friends of Peter Jay Elliott (sic). Here it's June Abbott in Madrid and Maxwell Craig squeezed in between them


    The job continues in this restaurant and Peter's welcomed by Martin Lyder. That Ned Hood imposter is among the other patrons


    We are welcomed by a longer role for waiter Paddy Smith in this one. However, he's dubbed by David Graham, who also does the voice of David Gregory at the start of the episode and supplies a brief utterance from John Louis Mansi later on.

    Other familiar sights and sounds in this one include George Pastell back again, but as a different character and minus his dubious head covering. Some of the incidental music is "Pavane" by Roger Roger, a library track also heard in THE PRISONER.

  5. #3325
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    It's an absolute civil war trying to wade through the wide-brimmed hats, wigs and beards which are everywhere in Cromwell (1970). Many of the uncredited cast have already been identified, especially in the Parliament scenes, where the same extras turn up at different times as different characters in different seats and different costumes and different make-up. However, here's some more I found on my way through the film:


    Frank Finlay's about to get a literal earful. Holding him down on the right is Billy Dean


    When we're going into battle, Larry Taylor is there to try and organise the ramshackle troops


    In no particular order, some of the gentlemen of The Parliament and also at the King's trial include Colin McKenzie, Douglas Wilmer and Frank Draycott


    Roy Lansford looks very doubtful about his wig. Later on, he sports a far lusher one


    Geoffrey Keen has the floor and the thin chap towards the left in striped bodice is Anthony Lang. Peter Bennett, who IMDb declares had his scenes deleted, is also there and in fact can be seen throughout the film


    When the King pays a visit (not allowed today!), many eyes are on him, including those of Gerry Judge and Paddy Smith and top right, Lewis Alexander


    Gerry's back as a soldier listening to the orations of Patrick O'Connell, Frank Finlay and here, an emotional Richard Harris


    When Cromwell arrives back in Parliament, waiting for him are Pat Judge (who also sits there), Fred Machon and John Tatum


    His reception is not a warm one from Robert Morley and Charles Gray, plus there's Arthur Goodman on the left


    John Barrard next to Richard Harris with Hugh Elton behind him. Michael Jayston's also there, plus Victor Harrington far left as one of the trial assessors. The other assessor is George Holdcroft, who also plays a member of Parliament in different get-up.

  6. #3326
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The Clerk of Arraigns (Robert Perceval) reads the charges to the King. Harry Jones is the Clerk's clerk


    When the verdict has to be decided, Ron Gregory is there to help. The blur in the foreground, who is not so helpful, is Donald Bisset


    Although Douglas Wilmer has his doubts, it seems it is Bert Vivian sitting camera left of him


    And there's no doubt that's Harold Coyne on Cromwell's right


    Is that Aidan Harrington on Cromwell's left? It's not on his list


    The King has a date with destiny. The colonel who's come to collect him is not readily identifiable, but unless it's dubbing duty only for him, it's Robert James. The Bishop is John Welsh, but he is certainly dubbed


    It looks like Oliver is poking out the eye of his son (Anthony May). Ian Selby and Donald Bisset are suitably shocked


    And when Cromwell finally returns to Parliament for the last time, his attention is taken by the rotund gentleman on the left, who appears to be Peter Bathurst. Mr. Speaker is Llewellyn Rees.

  7. #3327
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Thanks Gerald. Excellent sightings as usual. I've added another ten to list. And while searching I came across these two



    Pretty sure that's Reg and Aitch both playing men at arms when the king enters parliament.

  8. #3328
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Great stuff, Movie Dude; that's definitely Reg Thomason and Harry Fielder.

    THE BARON is not so fruitful in his next episode, the Scottish-set "The Man Outside" and the man outside the Highland post office here:


    Is Roy Beck. The lady on the left may be one of the Dowager Duo and the man walking away may be Arthur Goodman, but it's impossible to say.

    Roy appears earlier in the episode when he exits the coroner's inquest. That's interesting in two ways, firstly, he can be seen coming out of the same room twice and secondly, there not such a thing as a coroner's inquest in Scotland. A bit more research by writer Terry Nation and the change of one line of the script would have corrected this.

  9. #3329
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Here's some curiosities and odds and sods culled from THE A-Z OF TV A JOURNEY THROUGH BRITISH TELEVISION (tx: 01.01.1990):


    Presumably from before 1965 when advertising of cigarettes on TV was banned, here's the bride's mother getting rather upset in a Capstan advertisement, despite John Wilder and John More being among the guests


    Mum's not very happy about the wedding present her daughter is getting from her new husband. Jack Mandeville brings up the rear


    What the hell is John Tatum doing in the ladies' underwear department? That hat's no disguise, John. From a Berlei bra ad. Bet it's not on John's CV


    For once Charlie Price doesn't have the ugliest mug as that honour goes to Peter Cushing in in the Room 101 scene from 1954's NINETEEN EIGHTY-FOUR


    And John Wilder is back for record-checking in FABIAN OF THE YARD with Robert Raglan. No idea which episode, though.

  10. #3330
    Senior Member Country: England harryfielder's Avatar
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    I forgot this,,,??

  11. #3331
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    File of the Golden Goose

    Even in his 60's Jim Brady can still mix it. Here he is in this thriller from 1969, dishing out a spanking to Edward Woodward aided by Walter Gotell and Denis Shaw.
    Even though I couldn't get much of an image on the second pic, I'm pretty sure that's George Hilsdon in a sauna bar as Yul Brynner washes his face.

    File of the Golden Goose - Jim Brady.JPG

    George Hilsdon - File of the Golden Goose.JPG

  12. #3332
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    It must be George Hilsdon; I'd recognise those kneecaps anywhere!

    And it may be 1939 and there's a Murder in Soho, but I'd also still recognise:


    Pat Hagan and Victor Harrington about to trip the light fantastic. Sandra Storme on the right looks gloomy (possibly wondering how effective her acting is)


    Tripping it already seems to be Ian Selby in the middle. Joss Ambler is the drunk in the foreground about to do his own tripping


    A party is held for Jack La Rue and Jimmy here is the youthful Hugh McDermott


    Right in the middle of the party dancers is the never youthful George Spence. Alf Goddard is also there


    Drue Layton and Bernard Lee do some gatecrashing and the waiter wondering if the papers are in yet is Ballard Berkeley


    A toast for imported La Rue. Arthur O'Connell was also ferried in for this film and the cheerful toaster in the front looks to be Laurel and Hardy's export Charlie Hall.

  13. #3333
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    DEPARTMENT S discover "The Man Who Got a New Face", but we discover these have their usual uncredited ones:


    Alan Gibbs pushing his between Joel Fabiani and Dennis Alaba Peters. Dennis gets more to do in this episode, though sadly his acting doesn't improve


    Almost breaking the fourth wall, but not entirely as it's supposed to be a film set. Jack Sharp is a crewman in the middle, while the poncy director who is kissing Adrienne Corri's hand is David Kelsey


    Harold Coyne sneaks in as a waiter behind Joel and Alexandra Bastedo. Harold must be moonlighting, as he turns up as a waiter on a beach shortly thereafter, then returns to this job after that, when he's joined by Joe the Waiter


    Peter Wyngarde thinks this guy at the bar looks suspicious. Well, maybe it is a man who got a new face because Alan Meacham here looks very like Peter in his Jason King look. It makes me wonder if Alan doubled for Peter in this series.

    At the start of the episode, Arnold Diamond is watching a supposedly racy film, though in fact it looks like a sequence from The Hellfire Club (1961) featuring Andrew Faulds and also in that film (co-produced, directed & photographed by Monty Berman, producer of this series) is Adrienne Corri.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 17-07-14 at 05:23 PM.

  14. #3334
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    We get Home at Seven in 1952, via the pub it seems, but the police are soon everywhere:


    George Roderick ropes off the locus in quo. Don't see many bobbies wearing bowlers round my way nowadays


    Meanwhile, Arthur Mullard has gorn fishin'


    And Pat Hagan is going to take some pics if Michael Shepley shifts his carcass.

    The stills gallery shows the following sequence which is not the set-up director Ralph Richardson uses in the film itself:


    As well as Major Shepley and Inspector Campbell Singer, we see Constable Bill Baskiville who's not immediately obvious on screen.

  15. #3335
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Alan Meacham was Peter Wynyard's stand-in, and he did double him in some shots.

  16. #3336
    Senior Member Country: New Zealand Anthony McKay's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitstablejim View Post
    Alan Meacham was Peter Wynyard's stand-in, and he did double him in some shots.
    Another ersatz Jason King


  17. #3337
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whitstablejim View Post
    Alan Meacham was Peter Wynyard's stand-in, and he did double him in some shots.
    Thanks, Jim. I rather thought that would be the case as there was a kind of "wink-wink" comment made by Peter Wyngarde about Alan's character as the camera zoomed in to him for no apparent reason.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony McKay View Post
    Another ersatz Jason King

    It looks like Bobby Ball there!

  18. #3338
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Counterspy or Undercover Agent (1953) is a Merton Park cheapie directed by Vernon Sewell with husband and wife Dermot Walsh and Hazel Court playing husband and wife, although they have few scenes together and Hazel is wasted in her role. Indeed, things get off to a shaky start as before the titles but after the camera foolishly lingers on a terrible model shot of a house:


    Edwin Richfield goes over all shaky as he foolishly lingers over a safe and gets a lead reward


    When the cops roll in, it's Inspector Barlow at the door (no, really, but courtesy of a thinner model from Hugh Latimer), plus John Penrose and Reginald Hearne.

  19. #3339
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "Countdown" is yet another meaningless title for a Terry Nation episode of THE BARON, in fact the last in production, though not the last to be shown. Peter Brace and Les White both get a credit for once; Peter gets some lines and Les gets to play with a digger on a building site, but sadly neither of them make it to the final scene. Equally sadly, The B does. There's a not-meant-to-be-amusing scene where Peter, Les, Philip Locke and Michael Wynne have stockings over their faces, but they can still all be clearly seen! Anyway, also clearly seen at a film studio conveniently filmed at Elstree:


    In a similar shot to that recently shown on the ITC thread, here's a bewigged Pauline Chamberlain wisely avoiding Steve Forrest


    Plus here's Goodman as Gateman: Arthur Goodman minding the studio for Johnny.

  20. #3340
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    On the North West Frontier in 1905 (make that 1959), Kenneth More has to ready an old boiler called Victoria for a quick and silent getaway. It doesn't quite work out that way, but giving Ken some encouragement:


    The captain on the right is Brian Worth.

    Several sources have Allan Cuthbertson down as the monocled officer near the end of the film, but it is not Allan.

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