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  1. #3941
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Recent discussions with Scott Palmer reminded me that this "unknown* plucked from Aveleyman from THE AVENGERS "Man-Eater of Surrey Green" is Vincent Fleming:


  2. #3942
    Senior Member Country: England harryfielder's Avatar
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    I knew Vince....Nice man...

  3. #3943
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Also elusive in The Elusive Pimpernel (1950) is the identification of those demmed uncredited players. Seeking them here and seeking them there did me little good and all heaven or hell I can disclose is:


    John Chandos, I think, as a garlic-breathed landlord presenting a light snack which is not to Sir Percy's liking.

  4. #3944
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    John Chandos, I think, as a garlic-breathed landlord presenting a light snack which is not to Sir Percy's liking.
    A good example of how, when they found an actor they liked, P&P stuck with them as much as they could. John Chandos was credited in 49th Parallel (1941) and in The Battle of the River Plate (1956)

    John only has a few TV appearances listed between The First of the Few (1942), The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1947) and Secret People (1952). I wonder if he served in WWII or if he was kept busy with stage work?

    Steve

  5. #3945
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    Great work, Dave!

    Is that not Harold Coyne gain on the left with the real Andy Alston next to him?


    Is that Ernest Blythe in the centre foreground?


    I don't think it's Jim Brady in the crowd artists screencap though.
    Could be Harold, though when I watched I thought it was Kenneth Evans. Not sure if that's the real Andy Alston--not jowly enough. That could well be Ernest Blyth; need to go back and see if he shows more of his face. Not 100% on Jim myself, but he was eating and sitting in front of the "crowd artists" sign...

  6. #3946
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    A good example of how, when they found an actor they liked, P&P stuck with them as much as they could. John Chandos was credited in 49th Parallel (1941) and in The Battle of the River Plate (1956)

    John only has a few TV appearances listed between The First of the Few (1942), The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby (1947) and Secret People (1952). I wonder if he served in WWII or if he was kept busy with stage work?

    Steve
    Looks like he was heavily involved in radio work. From Radio Who's Who 1947:

    Has broadcast in many feature programmes and plays. Started his career by winning a scholarship to RADA in 1936. After two years work appearing in England and abroad, produced and played in "The Playboy of the Western World" at the Mercury and Duchess Theatres. This made him, at the age of 22, the youngest producer to work in London since Granville-Barker. First broadcast in 1938 in a radio-biography of Turner. Then broadcast regularly until joining the Army, first in the Seaforth Highlanders, then in the Parachute Regiment and the Special Air Service. During the latter part of the war ran a secret operational broadcasting station to parachute troops behind the enemy lines with the signature tune of "Sur le pont D'Avignon."

    Also gets a nice uncredited closeup in 3 Cases of Murder:
    3000-19464-0.jpg

  7. #3947
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Castle in the Air (1952) is a bit up in the air as a comedy, but there's a bit of genuine Scottishness to it, though not here as Brian Oulton tells the taxi driver to keep the change:


    But, then again, Brian is English in this! The surprised taxi driver seems to be Arthur Howell


    In full Walter Scott invented Highland rig-out, David Tomlinson swings into an Aberdeen hotel, where one of the barmen is Russell Hunter


    And the nosey lady is Muriel Greenslade


    One of David's boarders back at his haunted castle is Margaret Rutherford who's convinced he's the rightful King of Scotland. Other Jacobites convinced include the Reverend Andrew Stuart (John Rae) and big bearded Mr. Alasdair McAlpine Stuart of the Glen (Rufus Cruikshank). Alasdair's Little John alter ego, Archie Duncan, turns up in the film too


    Tea is served and Frederick Kelsey joins David and Barbara Kelly in getting stuck in


    It's soon given a boost by the addition of some drams and the wall-eyed Aberdeen chambermaid called Doris (of which there are many) I believe is Amelia Bayntun


    And this group of Jacobean jivers has a tipsy Joan Ingram within their number on the richt.

  8. #3948
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Although it's now into 1969, in a particularly daft bit of scheduling, the next challenge for THE CHAMPIONS is to undertake "The Search", which is again set on a submarine (basically the same sets as last time) and has Ernst Walder, probably in the same suit, in another role. It's another of those Nazis-are-back plots and Reginald Marsh in particular is extremely hammy as the narrow-eyed submarine captain. Filming all this nonsense:


    I don't know the identity of the director, but the cameraman looks to be the above-mentioned Vincent Fleming


    A bar scene and of course Jimmy Charters looks very pleased to be in it


    There's a nasty accident outside and although we get someone else reluctant to show more than the side of his face, I think this fisherman is Jack Sharp.

  9. #3949
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    There's a small cast for Who Goes There! (1952), so only a small addition of he who has gone there:


    Jack Arrow and a big cigar combine to be an American military tourist and Joss Ambler is the guide.

    On IMDB, Peggy Cummins is incorrectly given the role of "Christine Deed", whereas it's Christina Deed and A. E. Matthews is Sir Hubert Cornwall not "Sir Arthur Cornwall". Mind you, he's so dottled in this film, he probably won't notice.

  10. #3950
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In 1946, someone is Wanted for Murder, but these are wanted for sighting:


    Delighted to be enjoying all the fun of the fair, or at least to be looking right at the camera, is Horsey-Face. Not doing that is Eric Portman


    Certainly not delighted is a youthful but still grim John Tatum, heading out of a gramophone shop to go and buy himself a brown suit


    Tony Quinn is waylaid by Bill Shine and on the left, I think that's Harry Phipps (either very tall or standing on his Hyde Park Corner soapbox . . .)


    Derek Farr is desperately worried out Dulcie Gray, and no sign of Michael Denison anywhere. But on the left, that's surely young Jack Dearlove and his nose.

  11. #3951
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In 1947, letters are an important part of, and if they start, Dear Murderer. Tickets are important as well:


    Especially if Jane Hylton has forgotten hers and those for John Blythe if they want to get into the Follies. Jack Mandeville has no problem in this connection though


    Nor, it seems, Jack Mandeville


    But the glum and shadowy faces of Andrew Crawford and Jack Warner tell a different tale after hearing what doctor Jack Lambert has to say.

    So it appears cards were important too as it's a three jacks trick.

  12. #3952
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I of course mean Jack Armstrong in this one, not Mandeville.

  13. #3953
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    When Hammer's Whispering Smith Hits London in 1951, practically first off the plane:


    Is Pat Ryan, hurrying to baggage reclaim before Dora Bryan and her baggage Vic Wise, or maybe to the dance floor as he's later briefly seen in the film prancing round one

    Checking into the Hotel Plaza under the beady eyes and nose of Michael Ward, Whispering fails to see Eddie Boyce stride past:



    Alan Wheatley puts in an order with the waiter at the Greenfields Golf Club. As Herbert Lom's in the cast, it's no stretch to believe the waiter is his regular stand-in Emil Stemmler. Incidentally, Herbert wears a really good, almost bouffant, toupee in this film


    On the subjects of waiters and stand-ins, as Richard Carlson and Greta Gynt compare paychecks, Paddy Smith is away to give a customer theirs. Paddy was Peter Cushing's stand-in and so is here predating Peter's arrival at Hammer by a few years


    And here's a nice tableau: Small tough Ian Wilson and Big tough Arthur Mullard give poor dear Michael the willies. I hope his hanky is smelling of lavender water.

  14. #3954
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Ray Milland is The Safecracker (1957) and we'll crack open a few extra identities now; Movie Dude has already done this one, so there's just a few twists of the combination dial for:

    John Wilder consulting his script with Colin Tapley even before the main titles come up to discover he has a puzzled "Sir?" to utter

    A number of the characters are named after the actors playing them, so here Barry Jones's assistant Mr. Horsbrugh is Walter Horsbrugh. Ferdy Greek Ship Owner, er, Ferdy Mayne, is admiring his wares

    Here, Mabel Etherington is propositioned by a dirty old man, who walks past the camera again in the same direction seconds later

    Tony Mendleson contents himself with clomping along the wooden soundstage pavement

    Barbara Everest is consulted by Barry Jones as nosey neighbour Nora Gordon looks on (though disappears in a different angle shortly after)

    Time to go to the dogs and as Ray Milland collects his winnings, among the crowd there are several of our chums, including a beret-wearing Dido Plumb

    Ray's there with Melissa Stribling, but abandons her to the wiles of Eddie Boyce

    Here Ray's getting out fast and almost knocking down Tony Castleton as it does it

    As Inspector Cyril Raymond checks up about the winnings, milling around are the likes of Gerry Judge (earlier sitting behind Ray 'n' Mel), Hyma Beckley, Aidan Harrington and Richard Gregory

    Raymond of the Yard looks very unhappy now, despite being waited on by his driver Paddy Smith.

    Movie Dude, in your Unnamed extras section, 4 is the credited Gerald Case, 8 the credited Pamela Stirling, 11 the credited Bernard Foreman and 20 is of course the Victor Harrington lookalike.

  15. #3955
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Watching The Man in the Road (1956) on telly, so no screencaps, but Jim Brady has sizable screen time as Donald Wolfit's henchman, and Bill Baskiville and Paddy Smith show up as policeman; Bill even gets a couple lines.

  16. #3956
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    Genevieve has been visited many times, but here's a couple more sightings:


    I think this might be Jeff Silk behind Kay Kendall's taxi. His position indicates he might have been put there to help keep the real spectators away from filming (just as in other crowd scenes I see familar extras surrounding the stars).


    This is definitely Wally Bosco, though, asleep in the sitting room of Joyce Grenfell's Fawlty Towers franchise in Brighton.


    And Ernest Blyth cutting a rug on the dance floor.

  17. #3957
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The importance of being uncredited in Oscar Wilde (1960) means they appear here. Dave Wright bravely managed to catch some from excerpts of the film, but having seen the whole thing, and with apologies for a bit of repetition:


    The cast of "Lady Windermere's Fan" look up at the author and among their number are, nine from the left, Harry Van Engel, and unlucky thirteen, Tony Castleton


    A large audience, but frustratingly few can be made out. John More is in the front row and Joe the Waiter is almost in the centre of the picture with Charles Rayford picture left behind him. Arthur Goodman may be in row 2. Lots of false facial hair, however, and that's just the ladies


    Oscar W (a miscast Robert Morley) enjoys an after theatre soiree with Leonard Sachs and others and the waiter is Pat Judge


    Then a meal with some more friends when Pat's brother Gerry Judge takes over


    A rather more intimate Caf� Royal meal with John Neville gives us the man in the mirror Victor Harrington (who is also in several courtroom scenes later on)


    When the presence of Oscar and Bosie clears out a caf� in Gay Paree, Richard Gregory is left sitting there


    And up in the gallery, former old friend Fred Machon refuses to take Oscar's hand; after all, he doesn't know where it's been


    The first of two juries we encounter has on it Joe Beckett front row and Frederick Kelsey back row


    More rows on the other side of the court. Ralph Richardson is defending the Marquis of Queensbury and helping Ralph with the rules are barristers Arthur Goodman and Pat Halpin. Returning is Harry Van Engel, now with a hairy upper lip


    There's musical chairs going on with these spectators and barristers, but among the new ones are John Tatum (who also plays the same role in the other Oscar Wilde film), Jack Dearlove, Victor Harrington and in wig and gown in the centre, Emil Stemmler. Shorthand writing away like the devil throughout these proceedings, but out of shot, is "Peter Evans' brother".
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 17-02-15 at 06:00 PM.

  18. #3958
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Ralph's on his feet and on their backsides here can be seen solicitor's clerk Ernest Blythe, junior counsel Juba Kennerley and centre, right at the back, Guy Standeven


    Oscar's counsel is Alexander Knox and when he hurries back into court, the bailiff looks like Ian Selby with a false mouser on. (The other bailiff Dave put up on Aveleyman and is Ned Lynch)


    In the Cadogen Hotel, Oscar is ready to bolt and the porter, positively bursting with words to say, is Paul Phillips


    The police dicks appear in the guise of Martin Boddey (as Inspector Richards) and Arthur Howell (as DeWitt). Junior Wilde is Junior Morley, Wilton


    Read all about it cries Jack May


    Deciding all about it is this second jury comprising, inter alia, Paul Beradi, Bert Sims, Wallace Bosco and the one with the lines, foreman Ballard Berkeley (who curiously is not wearing a moustache on this occasion)


    Poor Oscar's very downcast now and getting ready to cast him down is P.C. Walter Henry. Walter's very visible in these sequences and in the earlier courtroom scenes


    The prosecution team here I think includes John More again as Solicitor-General William Devlin's junior. Within the spectating arena this time round is Otto Friese


    After a vacation paid for by Queen Victoria, Oscar finds himself back in Paris and encounters a bit of avant garde casting with Roddy McMillan as a garcon.

  19. #3959
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    A curious piece, Johnny Nobody (1961) was filmed in Ireland, include at Ardmore Studios, so just about all the background and crowd players are really johnnies nobody for our identification purposes. But another of its curiosities:


    As defending counsel Niall MacGinnis engages in a bit of courtroom theatrics, all that Joseph Tomelty gets to do is stare at him with a puzzled look.

  20. #3960
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    As an addendum to Oscar Wilde above, here's something from a quick sprint through Wilde (1997):


    Ron Gregory in the front row, appreciative at being at the first night of "The Importance of Being Earnest"


    Pat Gorman in the second row - and could that be bearded Michael Miller in the front row? - not quite so appreciative at being at the last public appearance of O.W. himself.

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