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  1. #4001
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Looks like Fred Stroud is getting a bit of Inter-City friendliness with Donna Mills in THRILLER "Killer with Two Faces" that'll get you arrested nowadays. One of the two faces is eerily visible on the left.

  2. #4002
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    There's lots of rattles and simple men in Rattle of a Simple Man (1964) and here are a few of them:


    We've not even got into the main titles and Stanley Black's jolly pastiche of football songs a la Eric Rogers and we get Pat Gorman at the top of the coach steps and Ted Carroll looking brokenly out of its window


    Thora Hird has one scene as Harry H. Corbett's over-protective mater and here she finds Mr. Stratton, alias Bryan Mosley


    At least Lew Hooper is doing something useful for the trip from Manchester down to the match in London


    And Lew's supplies soon help the lads into stage I, a singsong along with Lindsay Hooper (later seen in a couple of pub scenes too, crafty devil) getting stuck in. At the back of the coach, we can just seen our main protagonists Harry, Charles Dyer (who also wrote the piece), Michael Medwin and Hugh Futcher


    Ah yes, stage II has now been reached and the dozy dozens include Bill Hibbert, Manny Michael, John Tatum and Jack Sharp


    In the first of many pubs that feature, Brian Wilde seems quite familiar with Ned Lynch and I think we've got Harry Phipps between them


    A Soho visit to a strip club and the chucker-in is quite clearly Steve Donahue (though dubbed) and not Eric Mason as IMDb claims. Who are we going to find ogling inside?


    Fred Peck for one


    Arthur Goodman for two. Harry thinks he's surrounded by dirty old men


    Peekaboo, Walter Henry on the left


    Ned Hood and Austin Cooper too. Austin gets a pub scene later on as well. Ned probably didn't recover in time.

  3. #4003
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Another film, another bar . . .


    . . . those pubcrawlers Victor Harrington and John Wilder arrive as our lot heads out


    And in yet another one, the Prince Albert, the out-of-shot barmaid is Marianne Stone and Neil Osborne and Vincent Fleming are among the patrons


    As well as Pat Hagan, who is just about to put his specs back on for a better look at Barbara Archer who's scheming with dodgy customer Doug Robinson


    A more friendly customer is our old chum Reg Thomason


    And Tony Mendleson


    And Peter Avella and Lou Morgan too. Austin Cooper and Lindsay Hooper are also sneaking into the shot


    Doing his dinger is the landlord Peter Rendall


    Across town in the kitchen of an Italian restaurant, they're all doing their dinger. Mama is Marie Burke, Ricardo is Alexander Davion (with the most un-Italian accent you ever heard, vying with Harry H. Corbett's Mancunian one for awfulness), then David Saire as Mario, Diane Cilento, who puts in the best performance in the film, and waiter Andreas Malandrinos


    Back on the rattling coach going home, Michael Medwin looks rough, Michael Robbins looks in need of a public convenience and Roy Beck looks to the side.

  4. #4004
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Gerald, how dare you remind me about my youth without warning!

    Barbara Archer! LUXURY!

  5. #4005
    Senior Member Country: England phil's Avatar
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    All those pub scenes and no Jim Brady!

  6. #4006
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The threadbare 1956 ITC series THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO seems to have partially made at National Studios, Borehamwood and on duty there for villainous Don Noel Willman and meek Queen Margaret Whiting who are seeking "A Toy for the Infanta":


    Far right, Peter Diamond, who seems to be better at standing at attention than the rest of his fellows.

  7. #4007
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Elbowing their way in before Arthur Lucan does:


    Graham Tonbridge as the chauffeur for Lady Meersham (cue pipe jokes) played by Ethel Royal in Old Mother Riley Headmistress (1950). I think it's Catherine Carlton opening the door


    And John Adams opening this door for police commissioner Charles Lloyd-Pack in a scene transition mix from Mother Riley Meets the Vampire (1952).

  8. #4008
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phil View Post
    All those pub scenes and no Jim Brady!
    Just for you Phil, Jim Brady in a classic pub pose from I Monster (1971), which I watched last evening.


    Jim Brady - I Monster.jpg

  9. #4009
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    More from I Monster

    Fred Wood & Reg Thomason - I Monster.jpg

    Fred Wood and Reg Thomason propping up the bar.


    Ernest Blythe - I Monster.JPG

    Ernest Blythe goes more upmarket in a Gentlemans Club.

  10. #4010
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Fred Wood Spotted in Battle of Britain




  11. #4011
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    John Scott Martin as the front stretcher bearer in an episode of DR. FINLAY'S CASEBOOK called "The Polygraph" (tx: 27.12.1963). Hugh Evans is the expectant father, Rosalie Westwater the expectant mother and Andrew Cruickshank the expectorant Dr. "Aah Janet" Cameron. The presence of JSM presumably indicates that the studio scenes were recorded in London, but the fairly extensive location filming was certainly done in Scotland (possibly around Callander). Although most of the episode is deadly serious, towards the end we get a car chase between Doctors C and F with silent film piano incidental music, possibly because it's a Christmas episode?

  12. #4012
    Senior Member Country: England phil's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tigon Man View Post
    Just for you Phil, Jim Brady in a classic pub pose from I Monster (1971), which I watched last evening.


    Jim Brady - I Monster.jpg
    Cheers TM, Christopher Lee looks a bit worse for wear.

  13. #4013
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO and his chums the mute Nick Cravat and the partially horribly-dubbed Robert Cawdron, lead for "Marseilles", but before they get there:


    Conrad Phillips' dad Jean (Allan Jeayes) turns up to sell them the plotline


    In a waterfront tavern, they encounter barmaid Simone Lovell as well as tar Pat Halpin


    And an even tarrier tar Steve Donahue. Steve turns up again in the next scene as a lodging house inmate. And could the tar next to Conrad Phillips on the left be Edward Brayshaw?


    Onward to La Roche Lodging House where the disreputable proprietor is Eric Pohlmann and his well-thumped henchman seems to be George Leech, who manages to squeeze out a line regardless


    And one of its gracious customers is Denis Shaw (hooped tops not advised for gents of your build, Denis)


    Dastardly shipping merchants are in the shape of Andrew Leigh (I think) as Fernel and Andr� Mikhelson as Rousse


    While scurvy knave Fred Haggerty has pistol at the ready as Conrad shapes up to Andr�. Fred's also in the earlier tavern scene


    But before long the French fuzz arrive in their finery, including Martin Wyldeck and John Wilder.

  14. #4014
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    John Adams always seemed to play policemen, and here we see he was doing so as early as 1946, in the short English Criminal Justice:


  15. #4015
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO and his chums the mute Nick Cravat and the partially horribly-dubbed Robert Cawdron, lead for "Marseilles", but before they get there:


    Conrad Phillips' dad Jean (Allan Jeayes) turns up to sell them the plotline


    In a waterfront tavern, they encounter barmaid Simone Lovell as well as tar Pat Halpin


    And an even tarrier tar Steve Donahue. Steve turns up again in the next scene as a lodging house inmate. And could the tar next to Conrad Phillips on the left be Edward Brayshaw?


    Onward to La Roche Lodging House where the disreputable proprietor is Eric Pohlmann and his well-thumped henchman seems to be George Leech, who manages to squeeze out a line regardless


    And one of its gracious customers is Denis Shaw (hooped tops not advised for gents of your build, Denis)


    Dastardly shipping merchants are in the shape of Andrew Leigh (I think) as Fernel and Andr� Mikhelson as Rousse


    While scurvy knave Fred Haggerty has pistol at the ready as Conrad shapes up to Andr�. Fred's also in the earlier tavern scene


    But before long the French fuzz arrive in their finery, including Martin Wyldeck and John Wilder.
    Gerald I'm pretty sure that the Tar you thought might be Edward Brayshaw is actually David Garth.

  16. #4016
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Yes, it could well be David Garth, complete with widow's peak peeking out his woolly hat.

    I think John Adams will be like John Tatum, Bill Westley and others who had their own police uniforms, though John was at it so long, he would've had to get a newer style one later on. Nowadays, of course, a polo shirt and high vis jacket will just about do.

  17. #4017
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "The Luxembourg Affair" isn't an adventure for Napoleon Solo and Ilya Kuryakin, but for THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO. Soldiering on:


    Appears to be Peter Rendall on the left, while Joseph Ryan plays the Captain of the Guard


    Soldering on may be more appropriate for Fred Haggerty on the right here as there's a nasty burning smell about to reach his nostrils.

  18. #4018
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    From another short, this time a 1946 RAF police training film entitled Grand Slam:


    23-year old Michael Medwin, explaining to Flight Sergeant Lawrence O'Madden why he didn't inspect the ammo stores at an airbase in Egypt.

  19. #4019
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The U.N.C.L.E. titles continue for THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO with "The Texas Affair":


    The three beauties at the front involved in this affair are Steve Donahue, Peter Diamond and Rupert Evans, all ready for a fight (which they duly get)


    Rather more delicate dealing with the affairs of state are Ian Fleming and Stanley Van Beers.

    As to David Garth or Edward Brayshaw in the earlier "Marseilles" affair, looking at the scenes again I have to conclude it's likely not either of them.

  20. #4020
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Heads up in Bottoms Up (1959):


    It's not really a genuine sighting as they're credited for once although they get no lines, but it's nice to see Graham Tonbridge and John Wilder join the other old masters Richard Briers, Neil Wilson, Arthur Howard and Donald Hewlett in agreeing that the boys are revolting.

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