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  1. #4301
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "A Deadly Line in Digits" in JASON KING gives us:


    A deadly swerve for police driver, the inevitable Joe Wadham


    At a party/auction held by a criminal organisation, Eric Kent is one of the guests, narrowly avoiding being drenched here by Jan Waters


    I hope the villain on the right is Mickey Varey


    But the silver fox in the foreground is certainly Ned Lynch. Also appearing are Barry Lowe, Richard Marner and Michael Anthony


    As well as Tony O'Leary who gets a name "Max Shanner" and a line, and Joe Bartlett, who gets neither, but needs a haircut


    So does Peter Wyngarde, right at the back, and also here are Leonard Trolley and Lou Morgan


    More villains now, with the chisel-faced Bill Cummings (playing "Bill") and smooth Donald Houston (although third billed, he's playing a relatively minor role)


    In the crooks' control room (both it and Scotland Yard's are amusingly equipped with props from Century 21), the operator punching in the deadly digits looks like the series' stunt co-ordinator, John Sullivan, and indeed he receives punches shortly after


    Chief guest star is an only slight bedraggled Dennis Price, whose aide appears to be Alan Harris (who earlier can be seen in the Scotland Yard Crime Computer scenes)


    And to complete our line of deadly digital hoods, this taxi driver I think is Dinny Powell.

    Interestingly in one shot we get to see John Forbes-Robertson and Peter Forbes-Robertson together in a car and in a stock shot from DEPARTMENT S "The Trojan Tanker", Larry and Rocky Taylor together in a lorry.

  2. #4302
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Pat Ryan gets to deliver the second of his two lines of dialogue as Customs Official Perkins, so he's not the quiet man in The Quiet Woman (1951). That's John Horsley entering as Pat faces his boss Mr. Willis, played by Peter Madren, although IMDb lists an additional "Willis" played by Campbell Singer, who is nowhere to be seen in the film. Someone may have though Campbell plays the police constable seen briefly, but it's not he.

  3. #4303
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    This film may have The Good Beginning in 1953, but the middling and ending aren't quite so hot. Filling those areas out are:


    Harry Van Engel I think, second gent on the left as Robert Raglan gives out the cup for shortest skirt in town


    Paul Phillips creeps up on Peter Reynolds, determined to catch that beaver on his head in Lana Morris's coat. But he bottles out and merely utters the line "Your coat, madam"


    Paul's back again in this theatre audience, where I believe I can also see Ian Selby, Robert Gregory, Peter Rendall, Ernest Blythe, Jack Armstrong, John Wilder and Paul Beradi. Robert, Ernest and Paul B all appear in other scenes in the film too. In closer shots involving stars John Fraser and Eileen Moore, Jack Armstrong suddenly appears behind John


    This slightly tighter shot gives us a better view of Pat Hagan and John More


    In the crush bar at half time, Richard Gregory makes an appearance, glad he got served


    As we track along the bar, new named friend Norman Fisher isn't so glad, just thirsty


    Eileen and John and his hairpiece all look shell shocked by the lack of G&Ts. But at least there's Bunny Seaman in the left background chatting to Ian Selby, plus Jack Armstrong gets another appearance


    Lots of shifty characters down the pool hall when John traces Victor Maddern there, including Ernie Rice and his pipe.

  4. #4304
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Having watched Radio Cab Murder (1954) in which he appears and checking back through Aveleyman and Movie Dude's site, I realise that Unknown Male 36 is John Donegal.

    Also appearing, insofar as not already noted elsewhere:

    Jim Morris as a passenger who annoys Jimmy Hanley because he hasn't got change of . . . a pound. Jimmy's not particularly observant either because Jim was not the passenger seen in the process stage studio shots seconds earlier

    Pursuing their enquiries at an ice cream factory are DCI Bruce Beeby and also Pat Hagan in helmet; given the location, I wonder if Pat's P.C. 99?

    When the cabbies come to the rescue, leading them here is Jack Sharp, who finds time to change his coat between shots.

    The "Lon Chaney, Jr." lookalike appears in one location scene as Mr. Thomas, gets a line, but sadly no credit.
    Last edited by Gerald Lovell; 24-06-15 at 11:37 AM.

  5. #4305
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    Some small appearances in The Lady Vanishes (1938):


    Lots of forlorn travelers in the Gasthaus Petrus, and over Cecil Parker's shoulder is Wally Bosco.


    One of the other travelers is Movie Dude's Unknown Male 46 (on the far left).


    In the final scene, Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave are reunited with Miss Froy (Dame May Whitty), and the foreign office man, seen for a few frames, is a much younger Ernest Blyth.

  6. #4306
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Nice sightings, Dave!

    Tangled in The Scarlet Web (1953) are these uncredited or with unattributed roles:

    Release time down the local clink and first out after warder Eddie Boyce is Jack Sharp, who promptly spits on the ground

    Next out is the more congenial Leo Phillips, who has lines instead of saliva. This screencap is in fact from later in the film when he turns up again and does fellow ex-con Griffith Jones no favours. IMDb lists Johnnie Schofield in the uncredited cast, but I couldn't see him and wonder if someone thinks this is Johnnie, though he looks more like W. C. Fields to me!

    An inspector calls at the house of Robert Percival and it's Robert Moore as Detective Inspector Henry

    At Hazel Court's hairdressing salon, we find fluffy Alphonse (David Stoll) harangued by nosy Mrs. Palmington (Judith Nelmes)

    Her hair suitably fluffed by Alphonse, Hazel finds herself with more down-to-earth company in the shape of Michael Balfour

    Visiting the jeweller's, Hazel then encounters a smarmy Frank Forsyth, who has plenty of dialogue to burble. Seconds later, his colleague appears with one line to utter to another customer, Zena Marshall. He is Cyril ???, aka "Peter Evans' brother", but, line he may have, but alas no credit.

  7. #4307
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Screencap72 View Post
    Some small appearances in The Lady Vanishes (1938):


    Lots of forlorn travelers in the Gasthaus Petrus, and over Cecil Parker's shoulder is Wally Bosco.


    One of the other travelers is Movie Dude's Unknown Male 46 (on the far left).


    In the final scene, Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave are reunited with Miss Froy (Dame May Whitty), and the foreign office man, seen for a few frames, is a much younger Ernest Blyth.
    That's a fantastic early sighting of Ernest Blyth Dave. Easily his earliest recorded appearance so far.
    I've been trying to find some biographical detail on him. Looking through the archives under Blyth and taking an age range of 1900 - 1910, there are around 8 possibles on the pension archives. Difficult though to get any furthur info. If narrowed to London, there is only one entry, born 1910.

  8. #4308
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    That's about how many Blyths I narrowed it down to as well. I guess his extra career was interrupted by the war. Shame WW2records aren't accessible yet; would be nice to know the wartime careers of our extras, especially given how often some of them were in uniform.

    I got images of just about everyone that was in The Lady Vanishes, but cannot identify many. So if anyone wants to take a look at the Aveleyman entry and see if they recognize any of the extras, I'd appreciate it! I thought the officer that shoots Cecil Parker might be John Slater, but not sure.

  9. #4309
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I don't think it's John Slater, Dave, but Unknown 30 looks very like Frederick Schiller. I don't suppose 05 is Joan Hickson, 11 Theodore Wilhelm, or 49 John More?

  10. #4310
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Lots of extras watch the Little Red Monkey (1954), but few of them are recognisable. However, slipping through the doorway:


    Maryhill Sanatorium orderly Cyril Kent helps Arnold Marl� in, and helps himself to a line while he's at it


    Shouting all about it is a dubbed Jack May


    And keeping the colours flying is Edwin Brown on the left as P.C. Green.

    The end cast list indicates Rona Anderson plays "Julia McCullum", but that's the surname of another character and in fact her role is Julia Jackson.
    On the Network DVD, there's an interesting alternative opening for the film, a lengthy laboratory scene and some location work excised from the final version. Interesting because it has John Horsley playing a moustached scientist, and in the final version of the film, John's a clean-shaven detective sergeant.

  11. #4311
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    I don't think it's John Slater, Dave, but Unknown 30 looks very like Frederick Schiller. I don't suppose 05 is Joan Hickson, 11 Theodore Wilhelm, or 49 John More?
    I think you are spot on about Schiller, and 90% sure you are correct about Hickson and Wilhelm. Not so sure about More, but could well be. Thanks!!

  12. #4312
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    Movie Dude has done Diamonds Are Forever (1971), but for some reason he has a lot of extras labeled as "casino patron" when they aren't. Here's some other minor sightings:


    In the prologue, Terence Conoley appears to have lost his syrup (good thing, too).


    The guards at Laurence Naismith's mansion appear to be too far off to identify, but when zoomed:


    They sure look to be Tony O'Leary and Jack Arrow.


    Joe Robinson waits at customs; CLifford Earl and unknown are the standing customs officers, while Guy Standeven keeps his hat on inside.


    Pat Ryan is not a casino patron, but someone stepping out of the customs office.


    The casino scenes were filmed on location in Las Vegas, but this sure appears to be Peter Brace next to the craps dealer. Presumably he was on location for stunt work?


    Jack Ross (or Arnold Ross?) appears in the prologue as a casino patron, but here he is again in the moon crater control room, with Bill Hutchinson at the mike and another unknown.


    Movie Dude has Ron Gregory as another casino patron, but he's actually a CIA agent and so is Mike Stevens (I think).


    Finally, Lew Hooper is also a CIA agent, not a casino patron, while Ron appears to be getting ready to audition for Men in Black.
    Last edited by Screencap72; 25-06-15 at 11:44 PM.

  13. #4313
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Nice sightings, Dave, though that isn't Peter Brace with the craps.

  14. #4314
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    The Reluctant Bride (1955) is, I suspect, a hand-me-down American script (by Frederick Stephani) that Messrs. Baker and Berman got their mitts on for a go at comedy and the results are fairly flabby, despite good work from American stars John Carroll and Virginia Bruce:

    Here they reluctantly share a taxi with driver George Roderick putting on his best patient-but-only-just face

    Frank Sieman plays Ann Duran's reluctant groom-to-be in this scene

    Director Henry Cass was clearly reluctant to keep everyone in focus, perhaps Brian Oulton's stony look gave him the willies, but it certainly is Pat Ryan on the right at an abortive wedding

    Alexander Gauge is shocked to learn Cass is not so reluctant to give us a better view of Bill Baskiville

    And I'm sure Peter Swanwick, still in his tubby stage, will be reluctant to drive his car behind John and Virginia again, as he crashes into them no fewer than three times.

  15. #4315
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    He looks like Bartlett Mullins to me, Gerald:



    From Peeping Tom (1959)


    Dido Plumb has a great close-up in This Is My Street (1963):




    June Ritchie reacts with terror when she encounters the tramp, who points out that her missing daughter (Sheraton Blount) is right behind her.

  16. #4316
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Yes, I thought it was Bartlett Mullins for a while too, cornershop, but as the scene continued I realised it was in fact Peter Swanwick before he lost a lot of weight (possibly due to illness?).

    A lovely moody shot of Dido Plumb, by the way!

  17. #4317
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Not So Dusty (1955) is not so funny as it would like to be despite the capable performers in it. Also performing capably:

    Totti Truman Taylor in a substantial role for once engages with dustmen Leslie Dwyer and Bill Owen as block resident John Payne beams by

    As Bill and Les consider the reward Totti has given them for rescuing a valuable piece of jewellery, another resident and her son float by. This is about the best shot we get of her, Aileen Lewis I believe, and it's possible the boy, whose head we can just see, is her son who sadly died in tragic circumstances when he was a young man

    On the beat along a soundstage street is this policeman, who I think is regular P.C. John Adams

    A bit of a do for council workers involves several waiters, one of whom is George Holdcroft. The receptionist who is at the object of George's haughty glare is Diana Chapman

    Haughty too is this one on duty at the top table, Paddy Smith. Joy Nichols is Bill's click Lobelia (!) and Dandy Nichols is Old Mooing it for Les. Other waiters at the event who get lines as well as a screen credit are Alexis de Gallier (Alex Gallier), George Roderick and, for once, John More, although he is credited "John Moore"

    Although Joy looks in pain, she's in fact giving us a rendition of "Tell Me What To Do". Sit down and shut up, perhaps? Anyway, George Spence seems to be enjoying it

    Well, Bill seems to be enjoying his delve into the depths of Miki Dolan and Johnny Rossi is amused to watch it. More than watching the film no doubt.

  18. #4318
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    It's not just any old Port of Escape for John McCallum and Bill Kerr when they hide out on Googie Withers' barge which has TARDIS-like dimensions. Keeping an eye on things:

    P.C. Jim Morris thoughtfully licks his lips

    The lads decide to lick their lips around a pint or two, but Bill is distracted by the Salvation Army, but not by Jack Sharp who appears to wander by . . .

    . . . closely followed by Ted Carroll (broken edition)

    In the pub, randy John eyes up Ingeborg Wells (not knowing he'll inevitably encounter Googie Withers shortly), thereby not noticing behind him Jim Brady racking up another "man in pub" performance, this time with George Hilsdon. George goes one better than Jim because he appears in another pub scene later on, minus cap and with glasses on

    At the end of the film, there's a do down the docks and the onlooker who's managed to get into the key light is crafty Charles Rayford

    And rubberneck Pat Halpin makes sure he doesn't miss any of the gory details.

    The film has an 1954 copyright date on it, got its "A" certificate in March 1955, but doesn't appear to be have released until May 1956. Simon Lack is credited as "Reporter", but I didn't see him.

  19. #4319
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    I stand corrected with the "tubby" Peter Swanwick.

    Missed sightings?

    Pat Ryan walking past Pauline Stroud in Lady Godiva Rides Again?:




    Can't think who the first man is but surely that's Angus MacKay between him and Norman Rossington in The Comedy Man:



    As he looked in Percy (1971):



    Credit - The Actors Compendium

    I think Francesca Tu might be in that party scene in The Comedy Man as well (and Tennessee Ernie Ford). Still editing ...

  20. #4320
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Gerald, I can find no reference to Miki Dolan anywhere. Who is she and why no credits/www mentions??

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