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  1. #4321
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Sorry, cornershop, I don't think that's Pat Ryan or Angus Mackay, I'm afraid. The actor in The Comedy Man, who I think starts to dance with a man at the party (!), is also in Little Red Monkey which I watched recently where he plays a police detective.

    cully, for some reason IMDb omits Miki from its cast lists for Not So Dusty, but she does get an onscreen credit.

  2. #4322
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    THE AVENGERS and "Honey for the Prince":


    A rather good fight between stocking-faced Roland Curram and Patrick Macnee I think has stuntman Joe Dunne substituting for Patrick on the right here


    And when Patrick visits the Q.Q.F., he encounters a wistful "Napoleon" (Charles Rayford) and O.K. Corral-bound Mr. Prentice, who surely is Cliff Diggins?


  3. #4323
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    In Pacific Destiny (1956), Denholm Elliott and Susan Stephen are destined for the Pacific, so there's not much scope, CinemaScope or otherwise, for many sightings, but in the brief prelude in London:


    One of Denholm's uncles (Clifford Buckton) arrives at his club where stewards Guy Standeven and Tony Mendleson await him


    At the subsequent wedding, where another uncle (Felix Felton) is thankfully not going to try and press his large frame into the cab, the lady in fuchsia looks very like Mabel Etherington.

  4. #4324
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    cully, for some reason IMDb omits Miki from its cast lists for Not So Dusty, but she does get an onscreen credit.
    Gerald, if you're sure of the spelling I'll try and give her a credit but I'm puzzled why she has no other credits and the internet is totally silent about her...which is rare, I'm sure you would agree?

  5. #4325
    Senior Member Country: England cornershop15's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    Sorry, cornershop, I don't think that's Pat Ryan or Angus Mackay, I'm afraid. The actor in The Comedy Man, who I think starts to dance with a man at the party (!), is also in Little Red Monkey which I watched recently where he plays a police detective.
    Fair enough with Pat Ryan (more familiar with 'Peach and Hammer Man' Paddy) but still believe that's Angus Mackay. Most sources say 'MacKay'. At least we agree his surprised dancing partner is Pat Judge.

    The second young lady here is the one I suggested might be Francesca Tu. With Norman Rossington again (centre):


  6. #4326
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Before we enter the House of Blackmail in 1953, we visit a transport caff:

    As C. Denier Warren as Jock gives a pout worthy of Manny Michael, John H. Watson as Bert gives a stare (at Mary Germaine) that'll make his ears stick out

    Here she is, arriving with suspicious William Sylvester. Chris Adcock looks cheery with his cuppa, and his companion . . .

    . . . we shortly see is Ernie Rice, pipe in full billow

    From a-billow to Old Bill when we enter the House itself. Most of the principals are here: Denis Shaw, Ingeborg Wells, Hugo Schuster, Mary looking quite contrary, Patricia Owens, Barry Wynne and John Arnatt, with P.C. Brown propping up the pillar, once more John Adams on duty

    As William appears through the curtains, we get a closer look at the inspector, who is Sidney Vivian, and the sergeant, who is Fred Haggerty, and gets quite a bit of dialogue which he carries off very well, along with a minor bit of stuntwork thrown in. Mary's now looking very contrary.

  7. #4327
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    THE AVENGERS insist "Never, Never Say Die":


    Hugh Elton wheels Prof. Frank N. Stone () - or is it? - into the local cottage hospital as worried driver Christopher Benjamin noses forward


    There are a number of attendants who need to net a monster; Alan Chuntz for once gets a credit as well as lines and an opportunity to drive an ambulance. One of his colleagues is Mike Jarvis


    Well choreographed fights are a feature of the series and here Steed (played by Rocky Taylor) goes for a flight


    Getting well stuck in is Terry Plummer . . .


    . . . and when he lands, it's Eddie Powell he's suddenly up against. Chuntzy can just be seen behind him


    Steed arrives to investigate and he's greeted by the smiling and speaking Ernest Fennemore. In a bad continuity lapse (Mary Spain, I'm looking at you), when Steed leaves shortly after, he's wearing the outfit he has on in a later visit.


  8. #4328
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Its really nice to see all the stuntmen from the past, quite a few are no longer with us any more, God Bless Them all.

  9. #4329
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    "The Guilty Must Die" is a Paul-lite episode of PAUL TEMPLE as Francis Matthews only appears in a few film sequences towards the end and it's one of those only retained as a black and white telerecording. In a filmed sequence at the beginning:


    Ronald Gough appears as a witness to crime with a camera handy


    And I think this is bank manager Roy Denton as a victim of crime with fit nae handy


    If we look carefully between this romantic t�te-�-t�te involving Ros Drinkwater and Patrick Mower, I think we get to see Ron Gregory. I also think it may be as well this is only in black and white as I hate to think about the colour co-ordination or otherwise of Mr. Mower's attire


    Keith James does his blurry acting speciality down the pub. Jenny Lee-Wright is in the background, getting ready for George Sewell, while Alf Mangan on the right is getting ready for another pint.

    Directed with his usual panache by the great Douglas Camfield, whose son Jorund (Joggs) appears in an important role in the opening sequence.

  10. #4330
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    Behemoth the Sea Monster (1959) is a Quatermass-like precursor to Gorgo that has a surprisingly rich crop of uncredited faces. IMDb has a few, but missed many more:


    In the opening scene, star Gene Evans addresses the Conference on Atomic Researchers, including: Ernest Blyth, Paul Beradi, Fred Machon and Wally Bosco.


    Up in the nosebleed seats, George Holdcroft gets to ask "Who is it?," a nifty way to introduce Evans' character.


    Meanwhile, down in Cornwall the local pub is managed by Lola Morice and Jim Tyson.


    Henri Vidon is killed by the title beastie, and among the mounters at his funeral is Norman Fisher. I should know the vicar, but can't think of his name.


    More mourners, and I think that's Austin Cooper second from left. The older froggy fellow is one I see often, but don't think we know his name yet.


    Gene Evans is staying at the Connaught in London, and in the lobby, Aidan Harrington is reading a paper. I think that might be Colin McKenzie at right next to the plant. Ian Selby is preparing to ascend the steps with the lady.


    IMDb correctly identifies the first fisherman as Arthur Gomez, but neglects the second, Michael Mulcaster.

  11. #4331
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    Part II:


    This lab assistant gets a character name (Ned Lee) and plenty of lines, but no credit. Does anyone know him? Probably Canadian, as he has an American sounding accent.


    Evans takes a fishing trawler to search for his behemoth, captained by Peter Sinclair.


    Evans is met on land by Navy Lieutenant Michael Beint, still in uniform, but for once not playing a Nazi.


    IMDb correctly identifies Derren Nesbitt and Andre Maranne in the NATO phone sequence, but forgets the Norwegian officer, Gerik Schjelderup.


    Police sergeant Reginald Hearne brings a photo of a really big footprint to Professors Evans and Andre Morell, and the driver is Joe Wadham (of course).


    The scientists visit the radar station monitoring the Thames: the operator is Bill Edwards, and the officer is Gordon Sterne.

  12. #4332
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    Part III:

    The sinking of the Woolwich ferry is perhaps the dramatic highlight of the film, only let down by too many Corgi toys used as props. It looks like most of the extras were actualy crew and passengers, but:


    This happy couple is followed as they board the ferry and meet disaster--I wonder if they are anybody?


    I wonder if stuntmen were used in this sequence, as I am pretty sure this is Paddy Ryan on the left.


    and this crewman is perhaps stuntman George Crawford.


    and I'm pretty sure this officer is George Curtis. I also am pretty sure I saw Leslie Crawford and Arthur Howell going into the water, as well.


    Next we get a vox populi montage of people reacting to the disaster, starting with Paul Beradi again, listening to the radio news. Could that be Georgina Ward leaning in the window?


    It looks like Ernie Rice (or maybe Charles Rolfe?) wanting a good cup of tea.


    and Edwin Fowles is the patriarch of this nuclear family.


    Jack Mandeville get a name, 'roving reporter David McEvoy,' and several lines, unfortunately badly dubbed in an American accent. In his closeup, Jack vainly tries to cover his mouth with his mike, but it's hard to mask how badly out of sync it is.

  13. #4333
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    Part III:


    We enter the operations room, and police inspector Jack Armstrong swiftly passes by.


    The Port of London Authority Commissioner is James Dyrenforth, and Guy Standeven gets a nice closeup as a naval officer in the operations room.


    Dyrenforth gets a even closer closeup, affording Charles Rayford an opportunity to lean back and get on camera.


    I thought the evacuation sequence was filmed with real soldiers, but it appears the officer in charge is John More.


    And Guy is apparently in the Army now, as well.


    Meanwhile back in the operation centre, naval rating Tony Castleton mans the phones.


    The camera pans with Dyrenforth, and it looks like John Wilder filling out his Equity paperwork in the background.


    Alison ,the Marine guard says "Still in conference, sir," a rare line of dialogue for Charlie Price.

  14. #4334
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    Part IV:


    IMDb is a bit confused in saying Admiral Summers is played by Lloyd Lamble. Lamble plays the unnamed Admiral earlier in the film. Rear Admiral Summers is played, logically enough, by Julian Somers.


    Philip Stewart gets a nice closeup and plays the perfect politician, averting his eyes and saying nothing...


    John Adams keeps a watch on the Thames, though when he actually sights the monster, it's not him in the reaction shot.


    And here's Guy yet again, out of breath from running to inform P.C. Arthur Howell he's spotted the Behemoth.

    Then all hells breaks loose, with extras running everywhere and lots of Dinky toys getting trodden upon. Among the fleeing crowds:


    The real Andy Alston and Chris Adcock


    Guy sighting number four


    Bill Cummings doing a good job of keeping up with the camera truck.


    Definitely Ernie Rice here, sprinting pretty good for his age! I think you can see Peter Brace, Leslie Crawford and Frank Maher in this sequence as well. George Holdcroft shows up several times running, too.


    Finally, it's hard to tell with the helmet, but the observer of the spotter helicopter looks and sounds like Alan Tilvern.

    Any comments or corrections most welcome!
    Last edited by Screencap72; 30-06-15 at 05:05 AM.

  15. #4335
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    Absolutely splendid sightings here Dave! Keep up the great work!

  16. #4336
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    I concur, monstrous work, Dave!!

    I think the vicar is Tom Chatto and rather than John Wilder, it's Pat Ryan.

  17. #4337
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Johnny-on-the-Spot (1954) is not a peculiar treatment for acne involving a prophylactic, but a bit of a muddled murder mystery. Involved in the middle of the muddle:

    Conrad Phillips being lit up, Ronald Adam declining the coffee, Hugh McDermott dressed to kill and Louis Matto back on waiting duties with subservient lines to deliver. Behind the bar . . .

    . . . although his back is to us nearly all the time, a quick order of pink gins for Elspet Gray and Hugh shows us it's Patrick Jordan who gets a line or two, too

    Being inconspicuously conspicuous is police detective John Wilder

    Hugh has a ploy to deceive the villains and I think this is Gabriel Toyne as an extremely helpful garage proprietor who helps him out (for �100)

    This little gaggle of crooks with Elspet in their clutches comprises the unlikely Graham Stark, the uncredited Bert Larry Taylor and the classy Vanda Godsell.

  18. #4338
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Tigon Man's Avatar
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    Oops wrong page in error, meant to access watched last night page.
    Last edited by Tigon Man; 30-06-15 at 01:23 PM.

  19. #4339
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald Lovell View Post
    I concur, monstrous work, Dave!!

    I think the vicar is Tom Chatto and rather than John Wilder, it's Pat Ryan.
    Thanks! Does indeed seem to be Tom Chatto, and that is Pat Ryan. John does appear near the very end, as a naval officer ordering the mini submarine to be tied up.

  20. #4340
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    After watching the nice clear bluray of The Hound of the Baskervilles (1958):


    Sir Hugo's debauched pal on the right is surely Christopher Trace! Looking at the respective filming and recording dates, it would seem Chris started on BLUE PETER immediately after this. So the film is one he made earlier. Michael Hawkins is on the left


    The disgusted servant on the left is none other than the Old Codger. Sadly, he's not the credited "Servant", as that's David Birks who gets a few lines, as well as the honour of being thrown through a stained glass window at the start of the film and then roasted over Sir Hugo's vast fireplace


    On the steps of Castle Dracula, er, Baskerville Hall, the debauched one on the left looks very like Tony Castleton.

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