Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29
  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    7
    Liked
    0 times
    I saw it yesterday at the Stratford Picturehouse and it was simply stunning.



    Wow what a fantastic script and when hearing Terry Thomas talk I now realise where Basil Brush got his voice from!



    ian

  2. #2
    Member Country: Croatia
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    88
    Liked
    0 times
    I sometimes wonder what would it look like without the poor Fred Kite? And, what was that "Modern Times" sequence in the beginning all about? And I somehow didn't manage to come to terms with Sir Kennaway from the very prologue. Odd but brilliant mixture. It's all interaction and rhythm between the characters.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    332
    Liked
    0 times
    Peter Sellers was nominated for an Oscar for that role. He didn't get the Oscar (there was a lot of competition that year!) but won the British Film award best actor instead!

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    64
    Liked
    0 times
    The most memorable part for me was the ATV Outside Broadcast vehicle!

  5. #5
    Member Country: Croatia
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    88
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by NappieB
    Peter Sellers was nominated for an Oscar for that role. He didn't get the Oscar (there was a lot of competition that year!) but won the British Film award best actor instead!
    No, no. He wasn't. Two of his Oscar nominations went for "Dr. Strangelove" (1964) and "Being There" (1979). But not for Fred Kite. Not that this diminishes his achievement, though. I think Oscar would prove to be rather sudden for him then. BAFTA was just right. The fact that he eventually never won an Oscar is more due to his (politically) incorrect personality than his dubious acting abilities.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,281
    Liked
    0 times
    all those cornfields and ballet in the evening

  7. #7
    Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    24
    Liked
    0 times
    'An absolute shower'... memorable saying by Terry-Thomas's character - A very fine film indeed. Most of the main characters were featured in Private's Progress about 3 years earlier...

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: UK Wee Sonny MacGregor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    696
    Liked
    4 times
    Sam Kydd, on the picket line, to a cameraman "why don't you f f f f f f photograph someone else"

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    533
    Liked
    0 times
    Yes, a good line

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    332
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Ljelja
    No, no. He wasn't. Two of his Oscar nominations went for "Dr. Strangelove" (1964) and "Being There" (1979). But not for Fred Kite. Not that this diminishes his achievement, though. I think Oscar would prove to be rather sudden for him then. BAFTA was just right. The fact that he eventually never won an Oscar is more due to his (politically) incorrect personality than his dubious acting abilities.
    Ah! I stand corrected. Thanks, Ljelja! I was thinking of Dr. Strangelove for the Oscar nomination. But knew I had the BAFTA one right!



    I saw a 2 hour documentary on Peter Sellers here in the USA about 3 years ago. It was total garbage... a real hatchet job!!! The presenters absolutely destroyed everything he ever did. Maybe it's some kind of new trend: Create an Expose` even if it's false! And since you can't libel the dead...



    That sort of stuff shouldn't be allowed.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    187
    Liked
    0 times
    Hi All,

    I'm Alright Jack, brilliant film, Two Way Stretch and the Wrong Arm Of the Law thesw are 3 of my favourite Peter Sellers films. Real Life Experience, when I was a young fellow saving up for a deposit on a house I went to work at a small shopfitting company, and I beavered away on my circular saw and produced loads of shelves etc, the shop steward came around one day and said "who's done all this job?" "I have " I replied thinking I was going to get complimented on a job well done, back came the answer "you'd better slow down otherwise the gaffer will be stopping the overtime, you want nip off now and again and have a fag in the yard" "but I don't smoke" I naively replied, "well take a newspaper and go and sit on the toilet and have a read for 10 minutes" was the next suggestion, no wonder British Industry went down the pan

    regards Chris B

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    9,605
    Liked
    151 times
    Quote Originally Posted by codsall
    Most of the main characters were featured in Private's Progress about 3 years earlier...
    I think it was an unofficial sequel charting the post-war lives of the officers and squaddies with the class system replacing military rank. Even minor characters likes Kenneth Griffith and Miles Malleson reprise their original roles. (Le Mesurier oddly goes from shrink to time-and-motion man)

  13. #13
    Member Country: Croatia
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    88
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by DB7
    I think it was an unofficial sequel charting the post-war lives of the officers and squaddies with the class system replacing military rank. Even minor characters likes Kenneth Griffith and Miles Malleson reprise their original roles. (Le Mesurier oddly goes from shrink to time-and-motion man)
    That's right. Boultings intended continuing Stanley's adventures, now as a bumbling civilian. Only this time, the joke was on the labor movement. Both films, i.e. "Private's Progress" and "Jack" were after Alan Hackney's novels.



    "Jack" was released in the election year of 1959, and since it went well, many thought it helped Conservative Party winning them. If I'm not mistaken, I think that even later when Thatcher was to be elected for the first time, BBC canceled its election-eve broadcast fearing a bit that getting a partisan image wouldn't do it any good.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    10
    Liked
    0 times
    Reading through the pages of this topic, I'm surprised no one yet has chosen "I'm All Right, Jack," my all-time fav British flick. I like it for two reasons. First, the cast. Nearly everyone in it had already demonstrated their brilliance or had a brilliant career ahead of them. Ian Carmichael, Peter Sellers, Terry-Thomas, Liz Fraser, Irene Handl, John Le Mesurier -- seems everyone fired on all cylinders on this one, even in the bit parts.



    Second, I admire the nimble way the script stayed light in the face of what could have been explosive material. It pokes jabs both at labour and management, but never really gives offense to either -- or at least it doesn't savage one at the expense of the other. Anyway, I didn't think so. Perhaps others disagree. I was not living in the UK in 1959, so I do not know how it was received. When I compare it to, say, Carry On At Your Convenience, which was less nimble, I'm inclined to marvel at the skill one would need to pull off "I'm All Right."

  15. #15
    Senior Member Country: England Number Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,260
    Liked
    13 times
    Nice one DrUkulele. IAJ is certainly a fantastic film with a genuinely stellar cast - I personally consider it to be Peter Sellers' finest hour. The very clever script by Frank Harvey, Alan Hackney and John Boulting, together with Boulting's customary brilliant direction, gives this film a definate edge. Concise and highly observed, (another Boulting Brothers trait), it still maintains an extremely high standard of comedy. Also contains one of British films all time great lines from Terry-Thomas 'You're an absolute shower!' delivered in his inimitable style! British films don't come any better.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Country: England zettel45's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    1,075
    Liked
    32 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Number Six
    Also contains one of British films all time great lines from Terry-Thomas 'You're an absolute shower!' delivered in his inimitable style!
    His comment after that is priceless as well: "Sort of chap who wears his vest in the bath..." (quoted from memory, but you get the idea).



    In terms of politics, I think it's fair to say that the film is conservative with a small "c", taking the "they're all as bad as each other" stance beloved by reactionary souls everywhere. Fortunately, it is very well written, witty and excellently acted (Sellers' only better film performance is in Strangelove imho).



    For me, it's a prime example of an excellent film that I enjoy hugely, despite disagreeing strongly with its basic outlook.

  17. #17
    Senior Member Country: England Number Six's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,260
    Liked
    13 times
    Quote Originally Posted by zettel45

    His comment after that is priceless as well: "Sort of chap who wears his vest in the bath..." (quoted from memory, but you get the idea).



    In terms of politics, I think it's fair to say that the film is conservative with a small "c", taking the "they're all as bad as each other" stance beloved by reactionary souls everywhere. Fortunately, it is very well written, witty and excellently acted (Sellers' only better film performance is in Strangelove imho).



    For me, it's a prime example of an excellent film that I enjoy hugely, despite disagreeing strongly with its basic outlook.
    Nicely summed up zettel - (though I disagree with Dr Strangelove )

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: UK Merton Park's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    1,038
    Liked
    9 times
    To Number Six



    I think TT first said that unforgettable line in Private's Progress and the joke was carried on in IAJ. Priceless!

  19. #19
    Senior Member Country: UK RogerThornhill's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    5,365
    Liked
    67 times
    A wonderful movie, I like the question that Cynthia Kite (Liz Fraser) asks Windrush "Are them your own teeth?"

  20. #20
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,386
    Liked
    7 times
    In terms of contemporary reaction to the film there is several pages devoted to it in a book by Anthony Aldgate and Jeffrey Richards (Cinema and Society or something like that).



    I'm Alright Jack was the biggest grossing film of 1959 I think (or at least the biggest grossing British film).



    The left wing hated the film. The loathsome Derek Hill, film critic of Tribune, thought that Sellers' performance was disgusting. He had to confess that he did find the film funny and hated himself for laughing whilst watching it. Aldgate reports that subsequent issues of Tribune had various letters from readers appalled at the film.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Where's Jack ?
    By billy bentley in forum British Films and Chat
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 15-10-14, 01:57 PM
  2. My boy Jack
    By faginsgirl in forum Films on TV
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 13-11-11, 08:21 PM
  3. My Boy Jack
    By orpheum in forum British Television
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 15-11-07, 03:07 AM
  4. Mad Jack
    By 716Jones in forum Looking for a Video/DVD (TV)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-11-07, 01:23 PM
  5. Mad Jack
    By 716Jones in forum British Television
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-06-05, 10:05 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts