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  1. #41
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by alan french View Post
    Hi,
    The interesting thing about this subject, is that when Hollywood made the Errol Flynn version, they were actually going to copyright the historical term Charge Of The Light Brigade. But were told they could not. A lot of people do not know that.

    Alan French.
    Well look what they did with the term "The Thin Red Line" which was actually another action in the same battlefield on the same day

    Steve

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: Scotland
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    Nice to see there are others who dislike this film.

    Always thought it was just me. As the reactionary right wing Nazi that I am, I cannot stand Oh What A Lovely War either.

  3. #43
    GRAEME
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR View Post

    It is one thing to look back and see where previous generations were wrong. It is another to maintain a position of smug superiority while mocking and ridiculing them, and dismissing all that was admirable and decent along with the arrogance and villainy.
    Oh dear.

    I think Richardson's interest in attacking early Victorian imperialist military blunderings was less than you might imagine. His satirical aim was quite clearly set on contemporary targets, not least Vietnam. And upon a post-Imperial fantasy that even now lingers in the hearts of too many of my compatriots.

    It is part of an anti-war, anti-establishment, sub-genre that includes MASH and Catch 22. And, yes, Oh, What a Lovely War!

  4. #44
    Senior Member Country: Aaland dremble wedge's Avatar
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    There's a lot of background information regarding the film here

  5. #45
    Senior Member Country: UK Mr Sloane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Oh dear.

    I think Richardson's interest in attacking early Victorian imperialist military blunderings was less than you might imagine. His satirical aim was quite clearly set on contemporary targets, not least Vietnam. And upon a post-Imperial fantasy that even now lingers in the hearts of too many of my compatriots.

    It is part of an anti-war, anti-establishment, sub-genre that includes MASH and Catch 22. And, yes, Oh, What a Lovely War!

    Oh What A lovely War ! is different it does come from a more earthy working class tradition and works better on the stage. It may have lofty ambitions and touch on grand themes but works best in the claustophobia of theatre with a small cast.

    I do like the film it has a couple of wonderful set pieces and some lovely cameoes and touches and I think it was unfairly slated but do think the it works best in a more intimate setting or as a radio play.

  6. #46
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Sloane View Post
    Oh What A lovely War ! is different it does come from a more earthy working class tradition and works better on the stage. It may have lofty ambitions and touch on grand themes but works best in the claustophobia of theatre with a small cast.
    It's hard to do that final scene on stage,
      Spoiler:
    as it opens out to reveal the gravestones from horizon to horizon


    Steve

  7. #47
    GRAEME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Sloane View Post
    Oh What A lovely War ! is different it does come from a more earthy working class tradition and works better on the stage. It may have lofty ambitions and touch on grand themes but works best in the claustophobia of theatre with a small cast.

    I do like the film it has a couple of wonderful set pieces and some lovely cameoes and touches and I think it was unfairly slated but do think the it works best in a more intimate setting or as a radio play.
    Never seen the show (like to, though), I was talking about the film really and its place in the anti-war sub-genre. Attenborough gave us another (slightly) anti-war classic in A Bridge Too Far, which has quite a bit in common with COTLB.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: UK Mr Sloane's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    It's hard to do that final scene on stage,
      Spoiler:
    as it opens out to reveal the gravestones from horizon to horizon


    Steve

    That is a great scene emotional scene.

  9. #49
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Never seen the show (like to, though), I was talking about the film really and its place in the anti-war sub-genre. Attenborough gave us another (slightly) anti-war classic in A Bridge Too Far, which has quite a bit in common with COTLB.
    It's strange how A Bridge Too Far can be thought of as one of the most accurate portrayals of any event in wartime and at the same time be thought of as an anti-war film. I suppose that all you have to do to put most people off the idea of war is to show them what it's like

    Steve

  10. #50
    GRAEME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    It's strange how A Bridge Too Far can be thought of as one of the most accurate portrayals of any event in wartime and at the same time be thought of as an anti-war film. I suppose that all you have to do to put most people off the idea of war is to show them what it's like

    Steve
    Its realist approach and deliberate non-glamorisation is in stark contrast to most other big budget war movies. The decision to film an account of a military "blunder" rather than a victory is part of Attenborough's anti-war approach.

  11. #51
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Its realist approach and deliberate non-glamorisation is in stark contrast to most other big budget war movies. The decision to film an account of a military "blunder" rather than a victory is part of Attenborough's anti-war approach.
    It was a blunder in some ways, but it was also a remarkable achievement.

    Steve

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