Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 51
  1. #1
    Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    39
    Liked
    0 times
    Firstly, happy New Year to one and all.

    I am struggling to remember the title of a black and white film from (I think) the '30s or '40s, which showed an idealistic young man, who embraced socialism to remedy the injustices inflicted on the working man. He becomes a hero of the working men.

    Unfortunately, his agitation goes too far, leading to tragedy. I think the scene was a Welsh steelyard, when he incites riot.

    My vague recollection was that the star was John Mills, but looking at his filmography sheds no light, so I presume I have misremembered.

    I recall being very affected by the film, when I first saw it in my young teenage years (a long time ago, now!).

    I hope my vague recollections are enough to stir someone's memory. Many thanks in anticipation.

    Nandu

  2. #2
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,239
    Liked
    22 times
    Was it Michael Redgrave?

  3. #3
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by wadey View Post
    Was it Michael Redgrave?
    Wadey is right. It's Michael Redgrave in Fame is the Spur.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: Scotland bruiser15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Posts
    3,054
    Liked
    50 times
    I thought it sounded like Love on The Dole with a little hint of The Stars Look Down thrown in for good measure.

    Love on the Dole (1941) - IMDb

    The Stars Look Down (1940) - IMDb

  5. #5
    Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    39
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by will.15 View Post
    Wadey is right. It's Michael Redgrave in Fame is the Spur.
    As always, I'm very impressed by the knowledge of folks out there - "Fame is the Spur" it is.

    I had a peak on find-DVD but it doesn't seem to be listed. Would anyone be able to help with a copy?

  6. #6
    Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    39
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by bruiser15 View Post
    I thought it sounded like Love on The Dole with a little hint of The Stars Look Down thrown in for good measure.

    Love on the Dole (1941) - IMDb

    The Stars Look Down (1940) - IMDb
    Many thanks for the suggestions - I had a look on IMDB at the two films you mention, as well as "Fame is the Spur". The film I had in mind is definitely the latter, but The Stars Look Down sounds like my cup of tea, too!

  7. #7
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by nanduthalange View Post
    As always, I'm very impressed by the knowledge of folks out there - "Fame is the Spur" it is.

    I had a peak on find-DVD but it doesn't seem to be listed. Would anyone be able to help with a copy?
    I see listings for it on DVD, a little pricey on Amazon.


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fame-Spur-Mi.../dp/B000WF33JS
    Last edited by will.15; 01-01-11 at 03:53 AM.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    25,718
    Liked
    492 times
    Is there a riot in Fame is the Spur? The leading character certainly doesn't stay a hero of the working men for very long

  9. #9
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    Didn't he get the miners all stirred up and some of them killed?

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    25,718
    Liked
    492 times
    Quote Originally Posted by will.15 View Post
    Didn't he get the miners all stirred up and some of them killed?
    There's a mining disaster in The Stars Look Down - don't remember one in Fame is the Spur but mostly I remember Redgrave being beastly to the suffragettes in that

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    I probably haven't seen it in more than twenty years (saw it twice), but I remember he gave a fiery speech and the miners went nuts. Right after that he sold out. At the end of the movie when he is old he recalls the speech and is regretful the way his life went.

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    25,718
    Liked
    492 times
    You could be right. He does have a miserable old age so at least there's a happy ending

  13. #13
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    I always thought there was an interesting sub-text in The Man in the White Suit about proletarian resistance to change and why when a political establishment of that philosophy has power, human endeavour stagnates. I seem to recall that in the Guinness film the socialism lay as much within the purview of the enlightened patrician bosses, seeking to *protect* their workers, as much as the workers - who actually might have rather liked the idea of never having to do laundry again......

    It's Alright Jack also seemed to have a later continuation of this theme of British films not being too taken with the practise of socialism by those representing the philosophy, regardless of its theoretically-stated intentions. That film has the innocent individual caught between the forces of lazy managers and lazy workers.

    I recall reading that High Noon was originally badly thought of by the American Establishment because it suggested that "Society" was not so cohesive and supportive as they wanted it to be thought to be, at the time. It was not socialistic enough. It did win an Oscar though, suggesting that, like the British movie establishment, Hollywood also had no truck for socialism. Yet clearly many people within both those movie establishments were social idealists.


  14. #14
    Senior Member Country: UK Mr Sloane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    12,500
    Liked
    239 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin View Post
    I recall reading that High Noon was originally badly thought of by the American Establishment because it suggested that "Society" was not so cohesive and supportive as they wanted it to be thought to be, at the time. It was not socialistic enough. It did win an Oscar though, suggesting that, like the British movie establishment, Hollywood also had no truck for socialism. Yet clearly many people within both those movie establishments were social idealists.

    High Noon was recognised for what it is, a specific attack on the McCarthyism rife in American Society at the time. It is an individual standing up for what is right when society turns it's back for the easy life. I have never seen it as a socialistic film, yes it was written by a soicalist as an attack on one of society's evils but there is no communal Damoscence moment, Kane and his wife are left alone to deal with danger and move on. The moral is you can't rely on on anyone so all you can do is be true to yourself.

    Equally true it's a cracking yarn told well with great characters and performances which stands the test of time whether you read the subtext or not.
    Last edited by Steve Crook; 02-01-11 at 12:58 PM.

  15. #15
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,239
    Liked
    22 times
    Wadey is right. It's Michael Redgrave in Fame is the Spur

    Thanks will15 much appreciated as I could not think of the title

  16. #16
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Sloane View Post
    High Noon was recognised for what it is, a specific attack on the McCarthyism rife in American Society at the time.
    Given that Eisenhower thought it was a great movie - not everyone presumably:

    The film's abstractness permitted many interpretations. In the Midwest, for instance, Cooper was seen as a symbol of Eisenhower working against the communist threat, a view Eisenhower himself presumably adopted with his numerous White House screenings of the film.

    Everyone had a reason to like or dislike High Noon's message. John Wayne later called it "the most un-American thing I've ever seen in my whole life," and said he was proud to have played a part in getting Carl Foreman blacklisted. Meanwhile, the Soviet Union's Pravda -- presumably John Wayne's political polar opposite -- attacked the film as "a glorification of the individual." As Bart Simpson said, you're damned if you do, damned if you don't.

    I've been quite baffled over the years by the claims that this movie is an allegory about the McCarthy witch-hunts.

    None of the contemporary reviews I can find describe the film as having any political component at all.
    What's the Big Deal?: High Noon (1952)

    I agree with you that this movie seems the exact opposite to the Socialist Ideal. It is all about the power of the Individual (seems I'm in line with Pravda... ).... but the first first line suggests that the power of the myth that has grown around one interpretation of it is no weaker for the passage of time.

    The fact that it was not seen as Anti-Mccarthyism at the time, would explain why it was allowed to get the Oscars of course.


  17. #17
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    I have a suspicion Wayne saw the movie as anti American because he knew a Communist wrote it and not the other way around. He actually didn't publicly criticize the movie until years later.

    It's pretty hard to find a movie written by those evil commies that have pro communist messages, which was the whole point to blacklisting them in the first place.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    Quote Originally Posted by will.15 View Post
    I have a suspicion Wayne saw the movie as anti American because he knew a Communist wrote it and not the other way around. He actually didn't publicly criticize the movie until years later.
    He accepted Gary Coopers Oscar for him and cracked a joke about seeing his Agent after the ceremony about how come he (Big John) didn't get the part...

    I have read.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    6,364
    Liked
    0 times
    I think I saw Wayne make the comments on youtube after you reported that. I'll see if I can find it again.

    I can't find it now. I stumbled across it last time looking for something else. There were other things on the tape besides Wayne. He was smiling and didn't look like he hated the movie at all.
    Last edited by will.15; 03-01-11 at 02:06 AM.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    25,718
    Liked
    492 times
    Any contemporary reviewer who pointed out parallels with McCarthyism would soon have been writing under a different name...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts