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  1. #241
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Just arrived! An 8 x 10 press still of Bobby Henrey and MacGregor in the film.


  2. #242
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Just arrived! An 8 x 10 press still of Bobby Henrey visiting Ralph Richardson in the basement room at the beginning of The Fallen Idol. More stills next week.



  3. #243
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Just arrived (not expected until next Monday), this rarely seen 8 x 10 press photo of Sir Ralph Richardson as Baines,
    discussing the script of the film with Carol Reed while on location in Belgrave Square, London, in September, 1947.


  4. #244
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    ON LOCATION:

    Carol Reed himself is behind the camera on the first day of filming, Wednesday, September 17th, 1947, with the first scene to be filmed (Bobby Henrey running across Belgrave Square). On the left are Assistant Director Guy Hamilton; Associate Producer Phil Brandon and Continuity Girl Peggie McClafferty. The camera doesn�t have a soundproof blimp on it, because the scene is being shot mute and music will be added to it later on during the film�s post production.






    BELOW:

    Carol Reed was cheating a bit here, because the scene directly before this showed Sir Ralph Richardson and Bobby Henrey coming out of the tea shop opposite The Star Tavern pub in Belgrave Mews West and, when Bobby points out to Ralph that Michele Morgan is waiting down the street, they go to join her, walking past the camera and seemingly walking towards her at the opposite end of the Mews. However, Carol Reed didn�t think that the opposite end of Belgrave Mews West looked pretty enough, so Kennerton Street, Belgravia (seen here), was chosen to represent it. The location stills cameraman, seen here looking through his camera viewfinder, was Anthony Hopking, which begs the question if he was photographing a still of the three stars in Kennerton Street, then who was photographing this location still? For the record, all interior studio and portrait stills were photographed by Ted Reed.





  5. #245
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^ That third picture seems to show some kind of screen on the right: I wonder if that is to reduce the sun's glare on the camera lens?

  6. #246
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    It's possible, but I don't know what it is. It does seem to be something to do with the filming. And, oh yes, before someone points it out, I did mean to type Kinnerton Street and not Kennerton Street. Sorry about that.

    Hmmmm, it seems there is a very slight horizontal squeeze on the bottom image, which is a frame capture from the DVD. I don't know how that happened, but I will check the specifications on my screen capture device. Most people wouldn't notice it, but my early training as a projectionist makes it obvious to me when something doesn't look quite right. The squeeze is no more than 5%, but it's there.
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 19-04-15 at 07:50 AM.

  7. #247
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Left to right in the police station: Ralph Norman; Dora Bryan; George Woodbridge; Bobby Henrey and Torin Thatcher.


  8. #248
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Phillipe watches the police interrogation of Julie. Left to Right: Bobby Henrey; Geoffrey Keen; Michele Morgan and Denis O'Dea.


  9. #249
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^ I'm guessing that's a studio set with a back projection in the background.

    It's all in focus; I remember years ago being told film-makers would chose black and white over colour film because they could retain a deeper focal range.

  10. #250
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Yes, the French embassy set was all built inside Shepperton Studios. In those days, film makers had a choice whether to make a film in black and white or the very expensive three-strip Technicolor. But it was more of an artistic choice than a commercial one, as some subjects looked better in black and white and they could get results with it that were not possible with colour. I think this film was very suited to black and white and it wouldn't have worked so well in Technicolor, while a film like Black Narcissus, filmed the same year, was far more suited to Technicolor.

  11. #251
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Baines about to be arrested for murder. Left to Right: Denis O'Dea; Karel Stepanek; Sir Ralph Richardson; Geoffrey Keen and Jack Hawkins.


  12. #252
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Michele Morgan; Sir Ralph Richardson and Sonia Dresdel in The Fallen Idol.




  13. #253
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The New York Times Movie Review, Wednesday, November 16th, 1949.

    THE FALLEN IDOL (1948)
    Sutton Offers British Film, 'The Fallen Idol’.
    Called a 'Major Delight of the Season'.

    By Bosley Crowther.

    That young British master of the thriller, the suave and incisive Carol Reed, who has long since displayed his lofty talent for sheer excitement in "Night Train" and "Odd Man Out," has added another cubit to his stature with a wonderful new British film, entitled "The Fallen Idol," which opened at the Sutton yesterday. For not only has he got excitement of a most sharp and urbane sort in this firm, but he has also got in it one of the keenest revelations of a child that we have ever had on the screen.


    As a usual thing, films about children—especially those about children in distress—are generously loaded with pathos and solicitude toward the child. The youngster is too often naive, from the adult's blas� point of view, and perceived as an object for compassion rather than mettlesome respect. But that is not Mr. Reed's notion in this delightfully clever tale of a little boy who thinks that his adult idol has committed a murder and must be saved from going to jail. His notion is of a youngster whose mind is bewilderingly adroit and whose alarmingly scandalous deceptions are most amusingly incongruous to his years. And even though now and then he gives us piercing glints of a child's poignancy, his regard for the youngster is clearly on another than a sentimental plane. To be sure, the child in his fable, which is from a short story and script by Graham Greene, is no ordinary, garden-variety youngster. He is a foreign ambassador's son, living in bored and lonely splendor in a vast London embassy. And his sole understanding companion—outside of MacGregor, a pet snake—is the head butler of the establishment, who makes a rather odd companion for a child. Especially is he somewhat dubious in that he hates the housekeeper, his wife, and is deeply infatuated with a young lady who works in the embassy. But it is just this rarity of the youngster—and this perilous situation in his strange home—which has provided Mr. Reed with the materials for an absorbing and electrifying film. For the lad naturally meddles in matters that are none of his business, on a lonesome week-end, and innocently starts a chain reaction which is fearful and violent before it ends.

    Being entirely respectful of the competence of Mr. Reed, we are not going to tell you the story which his film fascinatingly unfolds. But we can say, without telling too much, that it shrewdly and wittily reveals not only the deep charm of the youngster but the disconcertion of the elders whom he gulls. It is freighted with sly and salient humors, very tender understandings of humankind and some truly blood-tingling surprises that Mr. Reed has directed in brilliant style. Everyone knows that his camera is one of the most fluent in use today. In this film, it is also one of the smartest in the revelation of personality. Needless to say, the youngster, whom a blond lad named Bobby Henrey plays, is the principal thing in the picture and Master Henrey runs away with the show. We can't even hope to do justice to the brilliant versatility of this boy under Mr. Reed's subtle direction and his instantly alert camera's eye. Such dazzlingly candid expressions! Such genuine inflections of voice! and such wonderfully childish behavior! Mr. Reed has worked a wonder with this lad. But he barely outshines his elders. Ralph Richardson is superb as the kindly and sympathetic butler who is overwhelmed by ironic circumstance, and Michele Morgan is beautifully wistful as the young lady whom he decently adores. Sonia Dresdel is crisply diabolic as the butler's invidious wife, and a perfectly charming performance of a distracted detective is given by Denis O'Dea. At least a half dozen others are rich in deftly written roles, particularly Dora Bryan as a streetwalker, name of Rose. Beautifully set in sleek surroundings, austerely suggestive of "affairs," and subtly ironic in its framing of a child in diplomacy's haughty realms, this thoroughly sophisticated picture, which David O. Selznick here presents, is a major delight of the season and a worthy successor to "Quartet" on the Sutton's screen.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The film was not released in the United States until over a year after its British premiere due to censorship problems involving the scene with Rose, the prostitute in the police station and the hint in one particular scene that Baines and Julie had shared a bed together.

  14. #254
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Scanned from page 18 of The New York Times Magazine, dated Sunday, April 17th, 1949.


  15. #255
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    An original 8 x 10 press still just arrived in my collection. Phillipe (Bobby Henrey) cowers in loathing in the prescence of the hateful Mrs Baines (Sonia Dresdel) as she attempts to wheedle out of him information about her husband and his secret lover. Despite his character's hatred of Mrs Baines, Bobby, in reality, thought the world of Sonia and she him and they got on famously on the set. This is a companion still to the one I uploaded earlier on page # 9 of this thread in comment # 166.


  16. #256
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Baines tries to restrain his hysterical wife (Sir Ralph Richardson and Sonia Dresdel).


  17. #257
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    ...Good and Evil. Mrs Baines, having found out where Phillipe was hiding MacGregor, comes down the kitchen stairs with his pet wrapped up in newspaper and, just as Phillipe, not knowing what she has wrapped up in the paper, begins to climb the stairs with his supper tray in his hands, he tells her: "I'm sorry I said I hated you." "That's alright", says Mrs Baines, coldly and without looking at him as she opens up the stove and throws the parcel into the flames, incinerating poor MacGregor alive. ...

    ...You can't have a more explicit example of good and evil in the same scene than that. ...
    Yes. That scene seems a perfect illustration of Graham Greene's Catholic concepts of Innocence and Evil.

    The film tells the story through the impressionable eyes of a child so Sonia Dresdel plays Mrs Baines as stylishly evil and extravagantly evil. She reminds me of one of those evil queens from those Disney movies�


  18. #258
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Yes, and she even makes Cruela De Ville look acceptable. The story seems to start in the middle of a story, so to speak, and one is tempted to ask why on Earth Baines married her in the first place...what did he see in her? Obviously, their marriage has been on the rocks for a long time when the film starts. However, although I've never been married and now, at 68, am very unlikely to be, I have observed married couples in my time and it seems to me that many of them get married under false pretences, with either each or both of the couple putting on an act and pretending to be something they're not in order to get a partner. Then, after they are married and are living together, they realise that the person they married is not the same person they met before they married them and the marriage starts to break down. The only way out of such a predicament is to always be yourself and don't pretend to be somebody else when your courting someone. Then at least, when they marry you, you know it's you they're marrying and not some pretend person.

  19. #259
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Carol Reed carrying out adjustments to the shooting script on the set at Shepperton Studios in 1947. As Reed explained: "I had planned certain scenes where Bobby Henrey would lean over the banisters, but very soon I noticed that when left to himself he was always getting into the most graceful positions, curling up his hands, and this was so much more effective than anything I had imagined, so very much more natural, that I changed the scenes entirely to conform with his mannerisms. A director should plan in advance how a scene is to be played, but he should always be ready to put the camera here instead of there, and change everything at the last moment if he comes across a better way of doing it. That is why I never ceased watching Bobby when we were on location in Belgrave Square. It was my business to make him do on the screen what he did, without knowing it, in real life. When I had that miles-away look in my eyes, I was watching how he walked, and all his ways of laughing, and crossing the street. With children, it is much the same as with grown-ups. To be any good to a director, an actor or an actress must either be wonderful, or know absolutely nothing about acting. A little knowledge - that's what is bad!"



  20. #260
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    To celebrate the first 25,000 views on this thread, here is a very nice quality original 8 x 10 press still of Bobby Henrey and Sonia Dresdel.


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