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  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the pics David, having just seen the film for the first (and definitely not the last) time, the window, etc; all make sense now, I enjoyed the film immensely, though I was quite upset when Mrs Baines did what she did to wee MacGregor, poor thing, maybe it was a ploy to make we audience want to despise her, which isn't difficult, I laughed at the scene where Phillipe is holding out a sandwich through the bars of the exit of the Gentlemen's conveniences at London Zoo, lol, brave of the young lad to run through the streets barefoot, he may have had some protection on for those scenes, but his barefoot running looked real enough, then at the Police station he turns to 'tart with a heart' Dora Bryan, reminded me of 'John & Julie' where Moira Lister takes care of the lost young girl.

    I won't delve to much into the final scenes, but it was gripping, with a psychological twist to it all as mentioned, when the weather cheers up a bit I'll have a walk around the locations, and a quaint looking Pub there is all the more incentive to go!, though I doubt the little Cafe is still as such.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: United States torinfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark O View Post
    Thanks for all the pics David, having just seen the film for the first (and definitely not the last) time, the window, etc; all make sense now, I enjoyed the film immensely, though I was quite upset when Mrs Baines did what she did to wee MacGregor, poor thing, maybe it was a ploy to make we audience want to despise her, which isn't difficult, I laughed at the scene where Phillipe is holding out a sandwich through the bars of the exit of the Gentlemen's conveniences at London Zoo, lol, brave of the young lad to run through the streets barefoot, he may have had some protection on for those scenes, but his barefoot running looked real enough, then at the Police station he turns to 'tart with a heart' Dora Bryan, reminded me of 'John & Julie' where Moira Lister takes care of the lost young girl.

    I won't delve to much into the final scenes, but it was gripping, with a psychological twist to it all as mentioned, when the weather cheers up a bit I'll have a walk around the locations, and a quaint looking Pub there is all the more incentive to go!, though I doubt the little Cafe is still as such.
    That was pretty bad, when Mrs Baines killed the poor snake but that was a sign of what was yet to come from her!

    While making the movie, Henrey became very close to Dresdel and got along fabulously with her on the sets.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    One thing I've learned from this movie is that if you're inside a Foreign Embassy building (as a member of staff) you're immune from prosecution even if you are a national of the Country the Embassy is in, that's the impression I had, I know Foreign diplomats have immunity (when outside of the Embassy, it's debatable if it's a good thing though), so basically you could do something naughty (on the premises) and get away with it.

  4. #44
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark O View Post
    One thing I've learned from this movie is that if you're inside a Foreign Embassy building (as a member of staff) you're immune from prosecution even if you are a national of the Country the Embassy is in, that's the impression I had, I know Foreign diplomats have immunity (when outside of the Embassy, it's debatable if it's a good thing though), so basically you could do something naughty (on the premises) and get away with it.
    An embassy of a country is regarded as being a part of that country. It doesn't just apply to members of staff in the embassy. If you went into the American embassy in London and committed a crime under English law then you wouldn't be prosecuted under English law because you wouldn't be in England. But if you also broke American law by your action then you would probably be prosecuted under American law :mono:

    Steve

  5. #45
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    An embassy of a country is regarded as being a part of that country. It doesn't just apply to members of staff in the embassy. If you went into the American embassy in London and committed a crime under English law then you wouldn't be prosecuted under English law because you wouldn't be in England. But if you also broke American law by your action then you would probably be prosecuted under American law :mono:

    Steve
    That's not actually quite true - . The French Embassy is still Britain but diplomats do get immunity from prosecution under local laws. Not sure it would really apply to British staff there though

  6. #46
    Senior Member Country: England billy farmer's Avatar
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    I ordered a copy of The Fallen Idol today (from Amazon), i can't remember ever having seen The Fallen Idol, i look forward to watching the film soon (the reviews for the film on Amazon are very good).

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: United States torinfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy farmer View Post
    I ordered a copy of The Fallen Idol today (from Amazon), i can't remember ever having seen The Fallen Idol, i look forward to watching the film soon (the reviews for the film on Amazon are very good).

    You'll like it!

    Mr T enjoys watching it too he calls it a cheap form of bc. LOL

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: England billy farmer's Avatar
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    The Fallen Idol (1948) is a great film which i thoroughly enjoyed watching (on DVD) very much, Bobby Henrey gave a great performance (in the role of Phillipe), there were also great performances from Ralph Richardson, Michele Morgan and Sonia Dresdel (playing a very unpleasant character), there were lots of other familiar faces appearing in The Fallen Idol including Jack Hawkins, Dandy Nichols, Torin Thatcher, James Hayter, Geoffrey Keen and Bernard Lee, the character of Phillipe clearly thought a lot of Baines (Ralph Richardson), watching The Fallen Idol on DVD is a great way for anyone to spend just over an hour and a half, thanks to a friend, i will be obtaining a copy of the film The Wonder Kid (1952) very soon, The Wonder Kid featured Bobby Henrey in his second and last film role, Bobby Henrey will be 74 this year, Bobby Henrey's Autobiography will hopefully be published later this year, i have written some information about Bobby's upcoming Autobiography below.

    Advance Title Information
    From the Polperro Heritage Press

    Through grown-up Eyes
    Living with Childhood Fame"
    by Robert Henrey

    lSBN 978-0-9570481-8-8 [Paperback]
    lSBN 978-0-9570481-7-1 [Hardback]
    PUBLICATION: September 2013
    BIC Classification: BM/APF
    Price: �8.95 [Paperback]: �16 [Hardback]
    Size: 23.3cm x 15.5cm
    No. of pages: 200 Illustrated

    Bobby Henrey was eight when he was improbably chosen by film director Carol Reed and producer Sir Alexander Korda to star alongside Sir Ralph Richardson in "The Fallen Idol", based on a Graham Greene story. Released in 1948, the film was an instant box office success; the child's performance was singled out for critical acclaim and it remains one of the classics of British cinema. His brief film career over, the erstwhile star, an only child bought up within an exclusively adult world by eccentric parents focused on their literary careers, was suddenly confronted with the rough and tumble of school life. Survival came at the cost of burying the experience, pretending - unsuccessfully - It had never happened: an attitude Robert carried into adulthood. The death of his 19-year-old daughter and an invitation to a special screening of "The Fallen Idol" in London in 2001 finally persuaded him to come to terms with his childhood experience.

    "Through Grown-up Eyes" is a remarkably moving and candid account of coping with childhood stardom in post-war London and the vicissitudes of later life in the USA, tragedy and loss. it is ultimately about survival, treasuring the good things of life - and allowing hope to have the last word.

    POLPERRO HERITAGE PRESS
    Clifton-upon-Teme, Worcestershire WR6 6EN UK
    Tel: 018868 04

  9. #49
    Senior Member Country: England billy farmer's Avatar
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    I enjoyed watching The Wonder Kid (1952) on DVD yesterday afternoon (a friend sent me a copy of The Wonder Kid), another great performance from Bobby Henrey (in the role of Sebastian Giro), also very good performances from Elwyn Brook-Jones, Muriel Aked, Oskar Werner, Robert Shackleton and Christa Winter, there were some wonderful Austrian locations featured in The Wonder Kid, i enjoyed watching The Wonder Kid (1952) almost as much as i enjoyed watching The Fallen Idol (1948), a shame that Bobby Henrey only made two films.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: England billy farmer's Avatar
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    Bobby Henrey's Autobiography is now available for pre-order on Amazon - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Through-Grow...81/ref=sr_1_1?

  11. #51
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    Bobby Henrey (now Robert Henrey aged 74) has just written an extraordinary account of his experience as the child star of The Fallen Idol, explaining why he refused to talk about it for more than 50 years and what finally persuaded him to do so now. It's called Through Grown-up Eyes: Living with Childhood Stardom and can be ordered via the following link: http://www.polperropress.co.uk/page/..._grownup_eyes/

  12. #52
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    I haven't posted on here for nearly two years, but I am just popping in because what I have to relate is so important and special and I think that all fans of "The Fallen Idol" and Bobby Henrey (now Robert Henrey) should know about it. So read on:

    Well, it actually happened. At around 6 pm on Friday, September 6th, 2013, after my long and very tiring journey by train and taxi from Stoke-on-Trent, I finally got to see the legendary Bobby Henrey, now known as Robert Henrey and aged 74, at the Regal cinema, Tenbury Wells in Worcestershire. He had flown over from the United States to attend at the cinema the launch of his new and long awaited autobiography "Through Grown Up Eyes: Living With Childhood Fame" and to see with a large audience of invited guests (including myself) the screening of his classic 1948 film "The Fallen Idol". When we met and shook hands, it was like that scene in The Robe where Richard Burton meets Michael Rennie. I said: "I am deeply honoured!" and he replied: "I think the honour is mine!" I told him that I was his greatest fan and that his performance in the film was totally wonderful. Because I was already there when he arrived long before the audience did, I was able to have a good chat with him and we talked of many things and I told him that the Phillipe he portrayed on the screen was real within the film and that as long as the film exists, he will never grow any older in it and he agreed with me that the motion picture is the nearest we've ever got to having a time machine. He also told me that when my flickr photostream was online, he would pour over it for hours at a time and found it all so incredibly interesting. So you never know who's looking in.

    I was able to talk to him about himself and his childhood fame of 65 years ago and found him to be as charming a grown up as he was a child�although he has by now completely lost his early French accent. In fact, I would say his accent is now English with a slight American twang, as befitting someone who has lived in the States for many years now. He laughed as I did for him my Bobby Henrey party piece of dialogue from his film: "Oh, look, there�s Mrs Baines on the balcony. Need we go in yet?" and he looked amazed by my Rory Bremner-like impression. We posed for some charming digital colour photos together outside the cinema, taken both by his charming wife, Lisette, and by Jerry Johns, the publisher of the autobiography and these photos will be sent to me by email as soon as Bobby gets back to his home in Greenwich, Connecticut. I can hardly wait for them to arrive, so that you will have an opportunity to see them. I could hardly believe this was happening to me as it seemed so surreal. But it was happening. I was also given a hardback copy of the book, dedicated to me by Robert in his own hand as Bobby Henrey and he seemed quite touched and overwhelmed by the reception given to him by all those who attended this ultra special occasion and it was surreal indeed, sitting only a few seats from Bobby, who was sat to my left in the row in front of me, watching him as he looked at himself in his film on the big screen. This was the first digital presentation of a film in a cinema that I had seen and I found the image just as good as from a conventional, projected, 35mm print, but it seemed that whoever was showing the film had not mastered digital projection yet, because the 4 x 3 aspect ratio of the film was presented in 6 x 3, which stretched out and distorted the image horizontally and made everyone look broad and fat. Sir Carol Reed would have put his hands in the air in despair if he could have seen it. But the occasion was so special that the audience didn�t seem to mind and enjoyed the film despite this.

    The film ended at around 8:35 pm, after which Bobby was to give a speech on the stage and take questions from the audience. Unfortunately, I had to miss this and the ending of the film because I had arranged for my taxi back to Birmingham New Street railway station to pick me up outside the cinema at 8:30 pm. Any later, and we would not have made the 45 miles journey back in time for me to catch the last train to Stoke-on-Trent. So, very reluctantly, I left Bobby sat there, happily watching his famous film.

    Now, although I travel okay on a train, it makes me feel very ill to travel in cars. I managed to get to Tenbury Wells from Birmingham without being sick. But on the return journey back to Birmingham, I became increasingly ill and the taxi driver had to stop the car three times while I got out and was sick on the grass verge. From experience, I knew this was going to happen, but, like the brave trooper I was, I went anyway, because I just had to see and talk to Bobby in person. It was so very, very important to me to do this and I just had to make it there and back on the 180 miles round trip. Was it worth all the trouble of the very long journey? Oh, yes, it was and I am so very pleased and happy to have actually met the wonderful legend that is, and always will be, Bobby Henrey. The cost: Return train ticket from Stoke-on-Trent to Birmingham: �16:50. Return taxi fare from Birmingham to Tenbury Wells: �165 and all worth every penny! I am pasting in underneath two photos taken by Jerry Johns of the Polperro Press, who are publishing the autobiography, of myself; Bobby (now Robert) and his charming wife Lisette, outside the Regal on Friday evening. As I stated above, more photos, taken of us by Lisette, will be sent to me later by email after Robert and Lisette return home to Greenwich, Connecticut.



    Last edited by Steve Crook; 08-09-13 at 01:05 PM. Reason: Nice to hear from you, but stop shouting

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: England billy farmer's Avatar
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    Darrenburnfan, thank you for a very interesting post (which i enjoyed reading), i am glad you got to see and talk to Bobby Henrey, an experience which i know you will never forget, i look forward to seeing some more photographs of you with Bobby Henrey (the two photographs above are very nice).

  14. #54
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Thanks, Billy. It was the most awesome experience I've ever had. I only wish that I lived in Tenbury Wells, then I wouldn't have had to worry about leaving the Regal early to catch the last train from Birmingham. I told Bobby that if Baines had been there, he would have been very proud of him.
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 08-09-13 at 01:36 PM.

  15. #55
    Senior Member Country: United States torinfan's Avatar
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    Darrenburnfan, good to see you, thank you for sharing your story, I'd love to read Robert Henrey's new book as "The Fallen Idol" is one of my favorite British films.

  16. #56
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Here is the amazon link to it, torinfan. I have just started to read it and have just reached the chapter where he is chosen for the film. He has certainly inherited his late mother's literary talents, as the style of writing, which is consistently engrossing, is very like hers. I promised Robert that I would read the book all the way through and let him know what I think of it. I don't read many books, but for obvious reasons, I'm going to read this one. I should add that the reason I was presented with a free and dedicated copy of the book (which is what I'm carrying in that Sainsbury's bag) is because I helped to provide stills for it from my extensive collection of memorabilia from the film and I get a credit in the book for it.


    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Through-Grow...=robert+henrey

    It is, of course, also directly available from the publishers, the Polperro Press (see link in post # 51)
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 08-09-13 at 08:12 PM.

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    An incredible 66 years ago this month. Phillipe (Bobby Henrey) and his nemesis, the hateful Mrs Baines (Sonia Dresdel) in Carol Reed's "The Fallen Idol". Despite his character's fear and loathing of Sonia Dresdel's character, Bobby thought that Sonia was utterly charming and got on famously with her while they were making the film together.



  18. #58
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Regarding post # 52. Sorry, Steve, but when I pasted in all that text from my Laptop, I couldn't find a way to reduce the font size. So thanks for doing it for me.
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 08-09-13 at 09:07 PM.

  19. #59
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Regarding post # 52. Sorry, Steve, but when I pasted in all that text from my Laptop, I couldn't find a way to reduce the font size. So thanks for doing it for me.
    I find the best way is to paste it into Notepad then copy & paste it from there. That takes out all of the large or fancy fonts and other similar stuff.

    I don't object to highlighting but making a whole post in a large font in bold is like shouting and it just takes up so much space on the screen so you can't fit so many messages on a page

    Steve

  20. #60
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Picturegoer review, October 23rd, 1948.





    Originally titled "The Lost Illusion", "The Fallen Idol" was directed by Carol Reed at Shepperton. It stars Ralph Richardson; Michele Morgan and Bobby Henrey and is already being called "the film of the year".


    **** THE FALLEN IDOL

    It’s always a rather dangerous thing to say that such and such is a "picture of the year", but for once in a way I have no hesitation in saying that this picturization of Graham Greene’s short story, "The Basement Room" is the best to date. Whether another even better will come before the end of the year I am not able to conjecture, but I doubt it.
    Briefly, it’s the story of a small boy, the son of a foreign ambassador, whose hero is his father’s butler. He is left alone in the embassy with him and his wife while the father goes abroad to bring back his wife who has been ill. The boy hates the tyrannical wife of the butler, and the butler himself is in love with a French secretary. There are several ramifications to the plot, which ends in the wife being killed in an accident which Scotland Yard for a while believes is a murder case. The point is that the boy is disillusioned with his butler hero. Firstly, because he believes he has murdered his wife because she ill-treated him, and secondly because the butler had lied to him about his adventurous career in Africa – a country which he had never visited. It’s the boy’s lies to help to protect his friend which nearly bring him near to the gallows.

    Finely conceived, brilliantly scripted and concisely directed, this is a picture which makes one proud of British production. The acting all round is superb. Ralph Richardson as the butler is natural and wholly sympathetic, as is Michele Morgan as the woman he loves. Sonia Dresdel as his wife is insinuatingly unpleasant. A completely well-timed role.
    Then there is Bobby Henrey as the small boy. Quite, I consider, one of the outstanding performances of this or any year. He is comparable to Robert Lynen, who created such a sensation in "Poil de Carotte", and was later killed in the war. Some of the eulogies for his acting must, I think, be apportioned to his producer and director, Carol Reed. I cannot advise you too strongly not to miss this picture. It has everything a really good picture should have.
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 08-09-13 at 10:33 PM.

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