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  1. #21
    Senior Member Country: Australia lllIIlllIIlllIIl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icetorch View Post
    Also interesting in the film is the sense of solidarity and lack of hierarchy among the British characters...
    I realise I should expect the unexpected when watching something an Archers Production. But I was confounded by this lack of hierarchy. I would have thought members of the Royal Air Force would follow a definite set of rules with a definite leader making the decisions.

    There's an odd discussion after they parachute in Holland (at the 29th minute); the Rear Gunner [Godfrey Tearle] says to the Pilot [Hugh Burden] "You command in the air then you should command in the ground'. But he and the Observer [Hugh Williams] disagree and ask "Why should anyone command?".


  2. #22
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lllIIlllIIlllIIl View Post
    I realise I should expect the unexpected when watching something an Archers Production. But I was confounded by this lack of hierarchy. I would have thought members of the Royal Air Force would follow a definite set of rules with a definite leader making the decisions.
    They do, while they're in the air. When they parachute out & land they appreciate that the circumstances have changed and that it is necessary to re-think things. For instance, the ability to speak even a few words of Dutch is more useful on the ground. As is a bit of tact and diplomacy and maybe even some acting skills


    There's an odd discussion after they parachute in Holland (at the 29th minute); the Rear Gunner [Godfrey Tearle] says to the Pilot [Hugh Burden] "You command in the air then you should command in the ground'. But he and the Observer [Hugh Williams] disagree and ask "Why should anyone command?".

    Why do you find that confusing?

    Steve

  3. #23
    Senior Member Country: Australia lllIIlllIIlllIIl's Avatar
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    ^ I can't imagine members of the Royal Air Force make such a Bolshevik-like suggestion. But I shouldn't quibble as it is a successful, entertaining propaganda movie.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Country: Japan
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    Quote Originally Posted by lllIIlllIIlllIIl View Post
    ^ I can't imagine members of the Royal Air Force make such a Bolshevik-like suggestion. But I shouldn't quibble as it is a successful, entertaining propaganda movie.
    Back then, a lot of your upper-middles started moving towards socialist ideas, and in some cases towards communism - or at least their supposed ideals. Whatever you think of the actual politics of these tendencies, I would say that this was an example of increasing solidarity during the war - the "pulling together" effect - and it is reflected in this film. Admittedly, the defects of socialism and communism were made adequately clear to Westerners in the post-war years. There are also some strong roles for women in this film, but I think that those were not a rarity in pre-war films either.

  5. #25
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lllIIlllIIlllIIl View Post
    ^ I can't imagine members of the Royal Air Force make such a Bolshevik-like suggestion. But I shouldn't quibble as it is a successful, entertaining propaganda movie.
    Bolshevik-like? We prefer to call it democracy

    Steve

  6. #26
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by icetorch View Post
    Back then, a lot of your upper-middles started moving towards socialist ideas, and in some cases towards communism - or at least their supposed ideals. Whatever you think of the actual politics of these tendencies, I would say that this was an example of increasing solidarity during the war - the "pulling together" effect - and it is reflected in this film. Admittedly, the defects of socialism and communism were made adequately clear to Westerners in the post-war years. There are also some strong roles for women in this film, but I think that those were not a rarity in pre-war films either.
    Powell and Pressburger films are often well know for the strong female roles. From Valerie Hobson in The Spy in Black and Contraband, Glynis Johns in 49th Parallel, Googie Withers & Pamela Brown in this one, Deborah Kerr in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp, and many others

    The strong women are one of the many things that makes P&P films stand out in that period

    In fact that's probably my only complaint about A Matter of Life and Death. June (Kim Hunter) spends most of the film just gazing adoringly at Peter (David Niven). But she shows her strength by the end of the film

    Steve

  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    An interesting bit of information about the film Gone to Earth from the 1950 edition of Film Review annual.



  8. #28
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    An interesting bit of information about the film Gone to Earth from the 1950 edition of Film Review annual.
    Another similar one about Black Narcissus
    The hunting scene in that film, in one of Clodagh's "Irish Idyll" flashbacks, was the Galway Blazers hunt. The Master of Foxhounds at the time was John Huston

    Steve

  9. #29
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Well, with John Huston being a fellow film maker, I guess he gave his permission gladly for that one, Steve.

  10. #30
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Well, with John Huston being a fellow film maker, I guess he gave his permission gladly for that one, Steve.
    Yes, but it's also an example of how Powell seemed to know everyone and everyone seemed to know, admire and even like him

    Steve

  11. #31
    Senior Member Country: Australia lllIIlllIIlllIIl's Avatar
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    There was more animal hunting in that clever scene linking the first and second parts of Colonel Blimp.

    Quote Originally Posted by icetorch View Post
    Back then, a lot of your upper-middles started moving towards socialist ideas...
    I guess that's why the people voted for Clement Attlee over Winston Churchill in the July 1945 election.

  12. #32
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lllIIlllIIlllIIl View Post
    I guess that's why the people voted for Clement Attlee over Winston Churchill in the July 1945 election.
    But it's still a long way from being "Bolshevik-like"

    Steve

  13. #33
    Senior Member Country: Australia lllIIlllIIlllIIl's Avatar
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    ^
    I understand the UK got the NHS in the late 40s; we got one in the 70s; I wonder if the USA will ever get one.

    nhs-beds.jpg

  14. #34
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lllIIlllIIlllIIl View Post
    I understand the UK got the NHS in the late 40s; we got one in the 70s; I wonder if the USA will ever get one.
    Not only the NHS but the entire "socialist" support system of a safety net for those who can't find work or can't work because of illness. a National Insurance system where we all help each other

    Steve

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