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  1. #61
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeB View Post
    My kids regard drinks/popcorn/Pick n' Mix as part of the whole experience
    So they've been brainwashed. Don't you fight against it?

    I wonder where the brainwashing started? Was it with multiplexes?

    Steve

  2. #62
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    I'm all for the civilized independent cinemas where you can sit down and have a beer/coffee/meal before or after the show, but eating inside the auditorium is a no-no.

  3. #63
    Senior Member Country: England cassidy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by narabdela View Post
    I'm all for the civilized independent cinemas where you can sit down and have a beer/coffee/meal before or after the show, but eating inside the auditorium is a no-no.
    I wonder if there are any "old Finchleyans" on the forum who remember the old Gaumont Finchley back in the 50's when it had it's own restaurant where it was possible to get lunch, high tea or a snack during the day but not I think during the evening. If I remember rightly a three course lunch cost about 3/6d. Those were the days.

  4. #64
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I dont think they've been brainwashed - its a treat for them, and going to the cinema is a pretty rare event. In fact going to the theatre etc has always had an element of buying food/drink whilst watching the entertainment. Just think of the snack sellers in the Coliseum ('Lark Tongues'!), and 19th century theatres were often as much eating/drinking establishments as they were theatres (they certainly were when it cam to the music hall circuit). I think Charlie Chaplin observed that his father probably drank most of his wages from performing before he'd even left the theatre. Even now, try and find a place at the bar during the interval at a theatre - we like a drink with our entertainment.

    By the 1920's, I'm pretty sure cinema's were selling sweets/chocolates/nuts (although during the twenties, US cinema chains banned popcorn - they didn't want to ruin their carpet - http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-c...475063/?no-ist ), and thats continued ever since. Of course US chains changed their mind during the Depression about pop corn (if it made money, they were all for it), although I suspect thats a more recent addition to the mix in the UK. However, the person selling ice cream at the front of the house during the intermission must have been a fixture for a long time, so UK cinema's were certainly selling food as well.

    I definitely remember chocolates/sweets being on sale during the early 1970's, and there was an ad that used to pop up for an 'ice cold coke from the foyer', as well as a one for a 'delicous hot dog' from the same place, and this was certainly pre multiplex. From the eighties comes this ad:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gh-QcHKSpGE

    Which is not exactly subtle!

    Cinema's sell food and drink because a) We buy it (and often come to expect it), and b) - because its profitable. As this wiki http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Movie_theater points out 'snacks make up 20% of revenue but 40% of profits in the United States theaters, with a box of popcorn generating a profit of 85%' . In fact, the snacks are how the cinema makes money - most of the ticket money goes towards the distributor, and this has been going on for a long time.

    A mate of mine and a friend of his went to a performance of Wagner, and during the break, got really hungry and went for Burger King, which they proceeded to eat whilst watching the rest of the opera! Apparently some of the audience was not happy! To be fair, anything by Wagner is so long that you need a decent meal just to keep going, but it does put snacking on opocorn whilst watching a rom com into context.

  5. #65
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeB View Post
    I dont think they've been brainwashed
    People who have been brainwashed rarely realise that they've been brainwashed

    Yes, I'm aware that cinemas have always sold snacks but they've not made them compulsory, have they?

    Why can't people go for a few hours without snacking?

    Steve

  6. #66
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeB View Post
    My mum, on the other hand, would bring in cans of coke, sweets, etc when we went to the cinema as kids, which was just about the time (early 1970's) when you still had a lady selling a tray of icecreams during the interval - there was no way she was buying overpriced drinks, etc.
    I suspect that many people still do bring in the food and drinks as the cinema prices are expensive?

  7. #67
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I suspect that many people still do bring in the food and drinks as the cinema prices are expensive?
    Yes, I'm sure they do, although its possible that many cinema's have a rule that you can only eat/drink stuff that you've bought there. How they enforce that rule, I have no idea. To be honest, I'm seldom organised enough to get suitable stuff to take.

    I found these UK ads from the 1960's.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEjEBbgaOiY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YdIneY-qIM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY0xzYOnihE

    All the familiar names, a lot of Supermarionation, and in the third one, a hot dog so amazingly basic and unappertising you wonder who bought them. Enjoy!

  8. #68
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric Warrior View Post
    I suspect that many people still do bring in the food and drinks as the cinema prices are expensive?
    ...but why do people feel the need in the first place?

    I think I agree with the brainwashing theory.

  9. #69
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeB View Post
    Yes, I'm sure they do, although its possible that many cinema's have a rule that you can only eat/drink stuff that you've bought there. How they enforce that rule, I have no idea. To be honest, I'm seldom organised enough to get suitable stuff to take.

    I found these UK ads from the 1960's.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oEjEBbgaOiY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9YdIneY-qIM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NY0xzYOnihE

    All the familiar names, a lot of Supermarionation, and in the third one, a hot dog so amazingly basic and unappertising you wonder who bought them. Enjoy!
    The first two videos are of my ten minute reel of 35mm sales trailers that I saved while working as a projectionist. The earliest one is from 1959 (Ice Pole) and the latest is from 1969 (Orbit). I sent a DVD-R of them to this guy and he uploaded them for me on YouTube. On my DVD-R, the old Pearl & Dean titles occur only once, about halfway through, but he re-edited the recording to make them open and close each video upload. In reality, Pearl & Dean had nothing to do with sales trailers for orange drinks and ice cream and the Seasons Greetings filmlets were made by the National Screen Service.

  10. #70
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Then they have come full circle! Thanks for saving them and putting them on DVD - its great to be able to see them.

  11. #71
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MikeB View Post
    Then they have come full circle! Thanks for saving them and putting them on DVD - its great to be able to see them.
    Glad you like them, Mike. I once had twice as many, but sold them to a collector in the 1980s when I was hard up. The usual fate for such sales trailers, each of which would have been run for as long as a year, was to throw them on the boiler or cut them up for use as leaders at the end of their run. Considering they each would have been run hundreds of times, they are in really good condition for all that, with no rope scratches or splices and just the usual scuff marks. I looked after them the best I could while they were in my care. Kia Ora and Lyons Maid would send us a new filmlet about once a year for each product, or when the price went up. An interesting example on the first video is Peach Sundae, which, in June, 1962, went up in price from 1/- to 1/2d and we hadn't been sent a new filmlet with the new price on. So the manager, Benny Norcott, had chief operator Arthur Shea scratch 1/2d over the 1/- price at the end of the filmlet...all 75 frames of it. It took him all night and he did a good job on it considering and it runs through in a few seconds, with the price dancing about all over the place.

  12. #72
    Junior Member Country: United States David Zellaby's Avatar
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    I always smuggle in my own snacks for a movie. Here in the US, the major cinemas charge a fortune for them. $8. for pre-bagged, butter-flavoured popcorn. $3.75 for a box of candy. $4. for a Coke, etc. I would never pay those prices. I've always liked the traditional snacks when watching a film, and I save a bundle by stocking up on the way to the cinema.

  13. #73
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Zellaby View Post
    I always smuggle in my own snacks for a movie.
    But why do you need to eat while watching a film?

    Steve

  14. #74
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^
    I might occasionally buy an ice-cream cone as a treat because going to the contemporary cinema is an occasional treat for me.

    I guess those people who feel the need to eat while watching a film have short attention spans or perhaps they don't wish to give their full attention to a filmmaker's art.

    Peter Weir used to be known for his rather precious, arty films. Ian Christie says Weir now consciously tries to "dumb himself down' because he knows current audiences are likely to be eating, chatting, phoning or using their iPad in the cinema.

  15. #75
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    But why do you need to eat while watching a film?

    Steve
    When I was a kid we watched movies in our cars. The audio was bad, as a small, hard plastic speaker (attached to a pole) could be hooked up to the car door. You had to be careful not to drive away with it. My dad would walk up to the food concession, and bring back popcorn and sodas for the entire family. I saw Mothra and some other Japanese monster flick when I was a teenager, with my boyfriend, Larry. He had a Chevy convertible. It was November. I wound up with pneumonia. My dad, who fought in the Pacific under General MacArthur, thought it was Hirohito's revenge.
    My husband and I watch movies at home, streamed or purchased DVDs, because it's cheaper and more comfortable. The volume level of the sound systems in contemporary movie houses are inevitably too loud for both of us. And the seats are not good for our old spines.
    As for eating watching movies...we microwave popcorn most every time we watch a film at home. It's traditional in our house. We're a mixed marriage. He likes buttered. I don't. We compromise by alternating.
    We even had popcorn while watching Foyle's War recently, coincidentally.

  16. #76
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    Peter Weir used to be known for his rather precious, arty films. Ian Christie says Weir now consciously tries to "dumb himself down' because he knows current audiences are likely to be eating, chatting, phoning or using their iPad in the cinema.
    Gosh that's terrible. Even if it's sometimes true he shouldn't assume that everyone is

    Steve

  17. #77
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    But why do you need to eat while watching a film?

    Steve
    Do you eat some sort of food while watching tv/dvd/blu ray or a video?
    Last edited by Electric Warrior; 19-03-15 at 02:41 PM.

  18. #78
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    yes I do but nearer to home the Odeon temple Fortune had a restaurant on the first floor by the entrance to the circle.waitresses with white aprons and head scarves.those were the days!

  19. #79
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    Gosh that's terrible. Even if it's sometimes true he shouldn't assume that everyone is
    It would be, if it were true. However, 30 seconds looking at Peter Weir's work on IMDB show the argument that he dumbed down his films for 'current audiences ..are likely to be eating, chatting, phoning or using their iPad in the cinema' is nonsense.

    After a whole series of arty shorts from 1968 to 1972, he made his first feature, The Cars that Ate Paris, in 1974, and then Picnic At Hanging Rock, in 1975. He then made The Last Wave (1977), Gallipoli (1981) and The Year of Living Dangerously (1982). The last, although offically an Australian film, is definately more of a US film, and then he made a the leap to Hollywood, where he made the rather decent Witness in 1985.

    I dont know what Christie's beef with Weir is, but I suspect his argument that is really that Weir stopped making small arty Aussie films, and instead made US based Hollywood ones. You could argue whether thats dumbing down or not, but its totally lame of Ian Christie to try and argue that his Hollywood career was effected in any way by using phones or Ipads. It was the mid 90's when mobiles first became cheap enough for everyone, and it wasn't until the early 2000's that the first smart phones really hit the market big, eating ppocorn etc has been standard for avery long time, and chatting to other people in the audience has been a round a lot longer than that!

    Weir actually continued to make a series of decently reviewed films, every so often, but his last two were Master & Commander (2003) and The Way Back (2010). Since one is about 19th century naval warfare and the other is about the escape from a Soviet gulag (I remember reading the book over thirty years ago), I'm not sure how he could have dumbed either of them down for an Ipad audience (which came out in late 2010) - perhaps some prat falls, etc?

    Critics always talk about dumbing down, and sometimes they are right. However, this looks like an example of 'look over there, a squirral' type misdirection, in order to try to make a general point.

    Electric Warriour - The same thought occured to me. Just how many people sit stock still in the same chair for 2 hours or more in semi darkness at home, without a break, a cup of tea, a biscuit, etc?

  20. #80
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Electric Warrior View Post
    Do you eat some sort of food while watching tv/dvd/blu ray or a video?
    Not if I've got company

    Steve

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