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  1. #261
    Senior Member Country: England cassidy's Avatar
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    Love the Sunday for One Night Only double bill at The Grange Kilburn in post 252. The Monster that Challenged The World with The Creature From The Black Lagoon. Those were the days !! Some great cinema name memories in those What's On In London pages. Well done Stephen and also DBF for those excellent covers.

  2. #262
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassidy View Post
    Love the Sunday for One Night Only double bill at The Grange Kilburn in post 252. The Monster that Challenged The World with The Creature From The Black Lagoon. Those were the days !! Some great cinema name memories in those What's On In London pages. Well done Stephen and also DBF for those excellent covers.
    Thanks Cassidy.

  3. #263
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  6. #266
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  8. #268
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    What a pity that Jane Eyre (post # 263) seems to be completely unavailable except on American low budget public domain DVDs of the most appalling picture quality. Rumour has it that British Lion destroyed all the prints and negatives of this excellent film. I don't know how true that is, but it may explain why it has never had a proper DVD release anywhere in the world. I ran it when it was originally released in 1971 and the picture and sound quality were superb. All we seem to have left is John Williams excellent score, that was released on a soundtrack LP at the time and has since been released on a CD. Does anyone know the state of the availability of the negatives? Have they really been destroyed? And if so, why?

  9. #269
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    If its any help, my Rank Film Catalgogue of 1973-74 lists it as having been converted to a 16mm 12-reeler. Unfortunately, the world experts in this format-Derann of Dudley near to me-closed down eventually just a few years ago but their stock may have gone elsewhere.

    I'll post up in a few days time some of my adverts and reviews of this 1971 if folks would like to share.

  10. #270
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    What a pity that Jane Eyre (post # 263) seems to be completely unavailable except on American low budget public domain DVDs of the most appalling picture quality. Rumour has it that British Lion destroyed all the prints and negatives of this excellent film. I don't know how true that is, but it may explain why it has never had a proper DVD release anywhere in the world. I ran it when it was originally released in 1971 and the picture and sound quality were superb. All we seem to have left is John Williams excellent score, that was released on a soundtrack LP at the time and has since been released on a CD. Does anyone know the state of the availability of the negatives? Have they really been destroyed? And if so, why?
    In my opinion, it is highly unlikely that a studio would deliberately destroy film material. When you say negatives and prints, they are two different categories. As most of us know, the term prints refers to material that is exhibited in theaters. After several years, these worn prints serve no further purpose and, rather than the expense of storage, they are disposed of. The negatives, interpositives and fine-grains etc., are valuable 'pre-print' material, essential for making new release prints and are stored at the expense of the owners. Usually studios take great care of this material, but it is generally known that this material can go astray over the years during shipping or incorrect cataloging. With independent films, materials get lost more easily. When an independent film reverts to its owners after the film has been initially distributed by a studio, it is the owners' responsibility to keep up the payments for storage. If they fail, the storage company, after several warnings, dispose of the material. One can only imagine how this is done, but the sensible thing is to donate the material to the BFI or the Academy in the US.
    In the case with "JANE EYRE" it is quite different. It was a feature in the UK and a TV show in the States. I worked on the post production of this film at Pinewood and all I can remember is recording dialog and sound effects for the feature version. The original negative would have been cut to conform to this version and a 35mm IP (interpositive) and dupe color negative would have been made for the UK release. The original cut negative and all negative trims would then be shipped to the television company in the US (NBC) and it is probable that the original negative was re-cut to conform to the television version. So only the 35mm IP and dupe negative survive of the feature version. If at some point they are ordered to be destroyed, or are somehow lost, the feature version now does not exist as the original negative only exists in the form of the television version.
    I do not guarantee that this is what has happened but I reckon it's not far from the truth.

  11. #271
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Thanks for the explanation, Stephen. It's a shame if that's what has happened to it. Fancy you working on the post production of the film, which would have been in 1970. It's a small world. Me? I was the humble projectionist at the end of the chain. But I like to think that I presented the end result of a lot of other people's work as well as I could.

  12. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Thanks for the explanation, Stephen. It's a shame if that's what has happened to it. Fancy you working on the post production of the film, which would have been in 1970. It's a small world. Me? I was the humble projectionist at the end of the chain. But I like to think that I presented the end result of a lot of other people's work as well as I could.
    Nothing humble about being a projectionist DBF. You, like myself. took a pride in our work as a projectionist. When I worked in cinemas from '64 to '68 I was very enthusiastic, like yourself, about presentation. The studios depended on our kind to present their product as well as possible. When automation and projectomatic started taking control over the presentation I knew it was time to move on.

  13. #273
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  14. #274
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  18. #278
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    This week's installment will appear on Sunday or Monday.

  19. #279
    Senior Member Country: England cassidy's Avatar
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    Interesting to point out that The Sicilian Clan was on in the West End on August 15th but didn't go on general release until October 4th, several weeks later.

  20. #280
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    Quote Originally Posted by cassidy View Post
    Interesting to point out that The Sicilian Clan was on in the West End on August 15th but didn't go on general release until October 4th, several weeks later.
    Attached here are the London Evening Standard's advertisements for that October 4th General Release, plus a couple of the advance 'teaser' adverts indicating that The Sicilian Clan started out life in the West End at the Carlton on (Monday) 27 July.

    SicilianClan.jpg

    Even with a standard release (i.e non-roadshow or extended run due to unexpected demand) the General Release would normally follow on the Sunday after the West End closure; or even up to ten days before whereby advertisements would specify for the double-bill that the lead picture only was still showing at the West End venue.

    Can't seem to trace a specified support feature on General Release as yet, maybe members on here might just have the What's On in London publication for roundabout that 4 October 1970 date which might suggest a distributors' wait for a suitable second feature.

    The Sicilian Clan was replaced at the Carlton by David Hemmings in Fragment of Fear on 3rd September 1970, which in turn ran until 30th September when replaced by Steve McQueen in The Reivers (dir.Mark Rydell) from October 1-28. The Rank General Release bookings during that period ran as followed:

    Sunday, September 20: The Executioner (Columbia Pictures)
    Sunday, September 27: Doctor in Trouble (Rank Organisation)
    (Sunday October 4: The Sicilian Clan-20th Century Fox)
    Sunday, October 11: They Shoot Horses, Don't They (Cinerama Releasing)

    Fragment of Fear at the Carlton was a Columbia release, which although not unheard of was not a frequent Carlton venue. Where Fragment might otherwise have fitted in was at the Columbia(owned by Columbia Pictures themselves) in Shaftesbury Avenue which was at the time occupied by George Segal in Loving (dir.Irving Kershner) from 1st-19th October, a space released by A Walk in the Spring Rain which ran at the Columbia from 3-30th September.

    Columbia Pictures, meanwhile, had done a re-run of Oliver at its flagship centre there in Shaftesbury Avenue from 23 July to September 2nd.

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