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  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    The IMDb will accept scans of real certificates. They can recognise real certificates. But scan the whole certificate, not just the part with the person's name on it

    Steve
    I'll keep that in mind, Steve, if I ever have to do it again in the future.

    David.

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    From Picture Show, dated March 27th, 1954.


  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Mackendrick certainly had maritime matters as a consistent theme. Apart from 'High Wind in Jamaica' his last, "Don't Make Waves" although not an 'at sea' narrative did focus on the coastline and its inhabitants on the Western seabord of America

  4. #44
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    He was also an excellent director of child actors who had never acted before...Mandy Miller; Tommy Kearins and Fergus McClelland among them and really brought out amazing performances from them. Certainly as good as Carol Reed in that respect.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Tommy Kearins date and place of death is now up on the IMDb.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Euryale's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Tommy Kearins date and place of death is now up on the IMDb.
    Ha! Ha! I had just checked and was about to post it! Pretty quick too!


    E.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    From the book Lethal Innocence, The Cinema of Alexander Mackendrick, by Philip Kemp (Methuen, 1991).

    If Tommy Kearins’ performance has attracted less notice than Mandy Miller’s in Mandy, it’s perhaps through being set in a less satisfactory, and less emotionally compelling, movie. But it’s an impressive achievement nonetheless, perfectly gauged in tone, likeable without cuteness, fresh and remarkably accomplished. As, for example, the brief scene on the quayside at Inverkerran where Dougie first encounters Calvin Marshall. Kearins, without a word of dialogue, conveys unmistakably that he knows who Marshall is; that he’s considering at least three possible courses of action (taking refuge in the puffer, feigning ignorance, or dashing off to warn the others) and, quite incidentally, that the cabbage he’s holding was lifted from a nearby garden. All this with no recourse to close-ups or exaggerated reactions. This is acting, and direction of acting, of a high order, the more so for its lack of ostensation.


  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Two original 8 x 10 press stills from The Maggie that have just arrived in my collection,
    with Hubert Gregg; Tommy Kearins and Paul Douglas.




  9. #49
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    THE MONTHLY FILM BULLETIN
    Published by
    THE BRITISH FILM INSTITUTE
    Volume 21, No.243, April 1954, page 53.

    THE MAGGIE (1954)

    The Maggie is a puffer, one of fifty-odd remaining small craft which sail among the islands of Western Scotland. Captain MacTaggart and his crew of three come into port with their ship badly in need of repairs and with no money to make her sea-worthy again. MacTaggart, however, tricks the agent of a wealthy American businessman, Calvin B. Marshall, into letting the Maggie take a private cargo from Glasgow to one of the islands. As soon as Marshall realises to whom his cargo has been entrusted, he tries to have it transferred to another vessel, but the wily MacTaggart contrives to evade him, and, when Marshall catches up with the ship on her way through a canal and puts his agent aboard, the crew at once engineer his arrest on a charge of poaching. Marshall himself now joins the Maggie; there follows a series of escapades, in each of which the crew manage to prevent Marshall from removing his cargo. Marshall, though exasperated by these setbacks, falls under the spell of the Maggie's charm, and when she runs on to some rocks, agrees to jettison his valuable cargo so that the little puffer may be saved. As a final gesture he even pays for the hopelessly bungled job so that the Maggie may sail again.

    The Maggie is a small, charming film which concentrates most of its attention on the character of its Scottish sailors. Here the director has been very successful in capturing the particular mixture of canniness and humour, petty deceitfulness and honesty. The performances of the Scottish players are wonderfully vivid: Alex Mackenzie plays MacTaggart with great assurance and quiet humour, and the boy actor Tommy Kearins gives a beautifully sincere performance, real and touching. William Rose's script provides some ingeniously contrived escapades, has, on the whole, excellent dialogue, but allows the pace to fall off a little in the final sequences. It is unfortunate that it also brings into the film a sort of sub-plot - about Marshall's relations with his wife - which never becomes properly assimilated into the story . Marshall himself (though competently played by Paul Douglas) is a character less thoroughly realised than the crew and their captain. The Maggie, while retaining the verve and sympathies of Whisky Galore! (Mackendrick's first film, with a similar setting and theme), is more firmly directed, and marks a welcome return to form among Ealing comedies.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: England DeadlyStranger's Avatar
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    The Optimum 4:3 print is really good, just had it on. Some great shadowy cinematography, especially on the American bloke's face.

    Line from the young lad, "you wouldn't understand"... a central tenant of the film being big money trampling on the lives of those economically close to the edge then, and potential ramifications.
    Shame the 19 year old Scottish lass wasn't featured more.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The BFI StudioCanal restored transfer is the best I've seen, considering the film is now 63 years old and it has the original BBFC certificate on the beginning, too. But, in common with most BFI StudioCanal restorations, there is no theatrical trailer included. It would be interesting to have been able to see how the film was pitched to cinema audiences on its release in early 1954. Incredible to think that Fiona Clyne, who played Sheena, the young girl at the party, will be 89 later this year. The scenes between Paul Douglas and Tommy Kearins are superbly acted, even though Tommy reported that Paul would drink excessively and would shout at him when he had a hang over (later apologising to the boy for his behaviour). The fact that Tommy, after his wonderful performance, couldn't obtain another part at Ealing or even a job there on the production side of films is a bit of a mystery. If ever anyone deserved a career in films, it was Tommy.

  12. #52
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    The fact that Tommy, after his wonderful performance, couldn't obtain another part at Ealing or even a job there on the production side of films is a bit of a mystery. If ever anyone deserved a career in films, it was Tommy.
    Maybe he was fed up with the whole process, or especially the hanging around that is a big part of the making of any film. It's certainly not all glamour

    Steve

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: Scotland Gerald Lovell's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Incredible to think that Fiona Clyne, who played Sheena, the young girl at the party, will be 89 later this year.
    She is a friend of one of my former work colleagues and was married to the recently-deceased producer Jimmy Gilbert.

  14. #54
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    It's a small world, Gerald. I've just received another vintage British 8 x 10 still from The Maggie (obtained from a dealer in America as usual) and I'll be scanning it and uploading it here soon.

  15. #55
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    And here it is.


  16. #56
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain bvs's Avatar
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    That is a wonderful picture : )
    Many thanks for posting it DBF

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Glad you like it, bvs. They are getting so hard to find now and often the Air Mail costs are more than the cost of the still.

  18. #58
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The two latest vintage 8 x 10 press stills from The Maggie to arrive in my collection today.




  19. #59
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The latest vintage 8 x 10 press still from The Maggie to arrive in my collection. This one shows the old puffer stranded at low tide on top of a subway tunnel apparently running along the river bed of the River Clyde in Glasgow. Was there really such a subway there back then and, if not, what is the boat stranded on?


  20. #60
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    DBF, look up Glasgow Underground Railway. A tube network from the 1930s. Not sure if it passed under the Clyde but a map you may discover will say so. Think though the idea of a tube network being so shallow built would be a bit fantastic.

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