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  1. #1
    Super Moderator Country: Scotland
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    I would like to ask some questions to people with an interest in this film (the 1955 version of course).



    If you own the film on DVD:-



    1) Did you get it in the boxset?

    2) Did you buy it recently since it has gone on sale individually?

    3) If it were to be released again with lets say an audio commentary by Herbert Lom (by a seperate venture disappointed with the orignal release as opposed to the same company trying to rake in the cash), would you consider buying it again



    If you do not own the DVD:-



    4) Have you avoided buying a copy as it has little to offer more than a video or a home copy?



    5) Would you probably purchase a copy of the DVD of the film if it was to have lets say an audio commentary by Herbert Lom?



    6) Would you be unlikely to have any interest in any DVD of the film?



    I am asking these questions as I am contemplating setting up a DVD company (to release some SEs of British films made prior to 1970), I am just using The Ladykillers as an example, I am not expecting to be able to get a license to release this particular film.

  2. #2
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    As you are using "The Ladykillers" as an example, our answers are of no real value. Nevertheless, here are my responses:



    1. & 2. I've just ordered it as an individual disc - because (a) the price is right; ([img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/cool.gif[/img] it's presented in its original aspect ratio of 1.66:1. (If it were a wider aspect, say 2.35:1, I would only buy if it were anamorphic widescreen.)



    3. I would only buy it again if I was disappointed by the picture/sound quality, and a later release explicitly offered a remastered version (as, for example, with films like "My Fair Lady" and "Vertigo"). I've done this recently - when I bought a better quality version of "Charade".



    4. & 5. Extras, in the form of Herbert Lom (or anyone else) giving an instant reaction to the movie as they watch it themselves for the first time in decades, do not interest me. A proper documentary on the subject would be a different matter.



    6. I would only buy a DVD if the film itself interested me - no amount of extras would get me buying a film I didn't already have on my Wants List.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Country: Scotland
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    Thankyou DaveB, this is most helpful. I agree that some audio comentaries are not very well prepared, and I have lost count of how many times some director has felt it important to tell us the fate met by a settee on view in a film.

  4. #4
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    I get annoyed when the menu tells you that there is a director's commentary and a documentary; and then you find the documentary is nothing more than the director repeating the stuff he spouted during the commentary.



    My favourite bit of director's commentary had him saying "We're now coming up to the scene where our hero walks into the bedroom and we see the leading lady topless. You know, the Americans were prudish about that sort of thing - and we had to re-shoot the scene just for them, with her wearing a bed-jacket. (Laughs) Here's the scene now - oh, it's the bed-jacket version."

  5. #5
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    The commentary on "THE WILD GEESE" DVD is good. Roger Moore, John Glen and Euan Lloyd chat about cast and crew. Burt Lancaster in the Richard Harris role, Stephen Boyd in the Jack Watson role and other tit-bits very interesting.

  6. #6
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    </div><div class='quotemain'>DaveB:

    I get annoyed when the menu tells you that there is a director's commentary and a documentary; and then you find the documentary is nothing more than the director repeating the stuff he spouted during the commentary.



    My favourite bit of director's commentary had him saying "We're now coming up to the scene where our hero walks into the bedroom and we see the leading lady topless. You know, the Americans were prudish about that sort of thing - and we had to re-shoot the scene just for them, with her wearing a bed-jacket. (Laughs) Here's the scene now - oh, it's the bed-jacket version." [/b]
    The best commentaries I have found on a film have been: "Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy" (The best with interview of LeCarre), "Dr. Zhivago" (sentimental, but really gives you the zeitgeist of the times of the movie and novel), "Casablanca" (Lauren Bacall narrates and has interviews with key people who created the film) and "A Hard Days's Night" (best on pointing out items and locations).



    Gibbie

  7. #7
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Imho the only thing that matters is the film,any extra's are exactly that,a bonus.I agree with DaveB the only time i would purchase a film again is if the print,or audio had been improved.That said i'll take ANYTHING if it's a film i love!

    cheers Ollie

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    I purchased the Ealing boxset when it was first released and it would take more extras than a commentary to make me buy it again. There does seem to be something of a cash-in on some titles as the first release is often a bare bones DVD, then a disc with extras, then as widescreen SE.



    Some like Trainspotting are now up to a 2 disc "Definitive Version" - until next year when a new "Honest Guv we've no more to add" version is released.

  9. #9
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    </div><div class='quotemain'>DB7:

    I purchased the Ealing boxset when it was first released and it would take more extras than a commentary to make me buy it again. There does seem to be something of a cash-in on some titles as the first release is often a bare bones DVD, then a disc with extras, then as widescreen SE.



    Some like Trainspotting are now up to a 2 disc "Definitive Version" - until next year when a new "Honest Guv we've no more to add" version is released. [/b]
    Don't fall for the "Special Edition" stickers on Criterion DVDs. They once admitted to me that the only thing special about them is that they've got a sticker on them!



    They covered themselves by rightly claiming that all their DVDs are special. But they only had a limited number of stickers.



    Steve

  10. #10
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    However, my Criterion edition of "Charade" is a 1000% improvement on the Madacy edition I used to own. The latter disc skipped occasionally, featured extras that wouldn't play, and had a soundtrack with a mains hum (remember them?) running all through it.



    The special editions that impress me come from Disney.



    The "Swiss Family Robinson" set, for example features:

    the film (in anamorphic widescreen),

    the Disneyland TV show of the Mills family (and Walt) visiting the Swiss Family Robinson display at Disneyland,

    a documentary of the making of the film,

    a related animated Disney short,

    an interview with James MacArthur,

    artwork, plus the audio commentary.

  11. #11
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I think one of the most impressive DVDs is the Criterion DVD of The Red Shoes (1948).



    + New digital transfer supervised by Oscar winning director of photogaphy Jack Cardiff.

    + Audio commentary by film historian Ian Christie, featuring interviews with stars Marius Goring and Moira Shearer, cinematographer Jack Cardiff, composer Brian Easdale and Martin Scorsese.

    + Third audio track with Jeremy Irons reading from Powell and Pressburger's novelisation of The Red Shoes.

    + Martin Scorsese's collection of The Red Shoes memorabilia.

    + A collection of rare publicity of behind-the-scenes production stills.

    + The Red Shoes Sketches, an animated film of Hein Heckroth's painted stoyboards. These may be viewed by themselves or in split screen (alternate angle) with the ballet of "The Red Shoes" from the film.

    + The animated film may be viewed with the music from the ballet or with Jeremy Irons reading from the original Hans Christian Anderson fairy tale.

    + Theatrical Trailer.

    + A Powell and Pressburger filmography with film clips and stills.

    + English subtitles for the deaf and hard of hearing.



    And all on one little disc :)



    Steve

  12. #12
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    Did you attend Michael Powell's John Player lecture at the National Film Theatre on Sunday, 10 January 1971?



    He seemed to think that we, the audience, were film students - and was surprised we weren't taking notes. The guy sitting in front of me asked if Powell had been influenced by Miró during the making of "The Red Shoes". Powell answered "yes" (end of conversation).



    Amazing to think that was more than half my lifetime ago.

  13. #13
    Super Moderator Country: Scotland
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    just watched I Know Where I am Going for the first time. I knew it had a bit of a following but I was quite surprised by how great it was. I know we are talking P & P, but even with all their expectations, it still blew me away.



    I have no viewed every single extra on the Criterion DVD.



    What happened to the two people playing the lovers involved in the subplot (Kenny and Bridie), Murdo Morrison and Margot Fitzsimmons? I know they would go on to appear in one more film each and then never appear on film again. I guess they are both still alive but neither rurned up in the 1993 doc by Mark Cousins.

  14. #14
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    </div><div class='quotemain'>DaveB:

    Did you attend Michael Powell's John Player lecture at the National Film Theatre on Sunday, 10 January 1971?



    He seemed to think that we, the audience, were film students - and was surprised we weren't taking notes. The guy sitting in front of me asked if Powell had been influenced by Miró during the making of "The Red Shoes". Powell answered "yes" (end of conversation).



    Amazing to think that was more than half my lifetime ago. [/b]
    No, I missed that one duh



    Powell was always surprised when he found anyone who didn't live and breath film (and art and entertainment) like he did.



    He did have some other interests - but they were often used in his films as well. Like his love of landscape, rivers & mountains (a keen hill walker, especially in Scotland) and his love of redheads thumbs_u



    Steve

  15. #15
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    </div><div class='quotemain'>JamesM:

    just watched I Know Where I am Going for the first time. I knew it had a bit of a following but I was quite surprised by how great it was. I know we are talking P & P, but even with all their expectations, it still blew me away.



    I have no viewed every single extra on the Criterion DVD.



    What happened to the two people playing the lovers involved in the subplot (Kenny and Bridie), Murdo Morrison and Margot Fitzsimmons? I know they would go on to appear in one more film each and then never appear on film again. I guess they are both still alive but neither rurned up in the 1993 doc by Mark Cousins. [/b]
    Good question JamesM.

    They each only appeared in one other film, Murdo Morrison in Silver Darlings (1947) and Margot Fitzsimmons in The Captive Heart (1946). Apart from that, I don't know. We'll have to put someone onto that.



    Some books (including Powell's autobiography) suggested that Margot Fitzsimmons was the sister of Maureen O'Hara. But she wasn't. Maureen O'Hara was born Maureen FitzSimons. Close but no prize.



    When I started to read your message I thought you meant the characters rather than the actors.



    I had an interesting discussion with a nice lady about what might have happened to the characters before and after the period in the film. That's at Intelligent Female Nonsense (to use the line from the film).



    Steve

  16. #16
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    Watched The Captive Heart on Classics tv the other night,absolutly dire quality,but i got the gist,quite enjoyed it in one of those insomnia type moments :)

    cheers Ollie.

  17. #17
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    In The Captive Heart, Margot Fitzsimmons plays the young woman who awaits the blinded Gordon Jackson's return. I think that is right.

  18. #18
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    Whenever I watch "THE CAPTIVE HEART" and it gets to the part when Derek Bond is saying a fond farewell to his girlfriend on the landing outside his flat I can't help wandering how the hell they got that grandpiano up them stairs?.

  19. #19
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    This film,restored,has been released on blue ray,here in Canada,and the U.S.A. The dvd is region A and region B. The colour,and photography is quite good. I have a 50 inch high deffinition telly. As for the sound,it was two channel sound. Good quality and no hissing on the sound track.

  20. #20
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I presume you mean the 1955 original and not that terrible Tom Hanks remake. What were the Coen brothers thinking of?



    Steve

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