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Thread: Dead of Night

  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: UK Juniper's Avatar
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    Actually I've think I've found out, with a little bit of research. It's probably an artist called Leslie Hurry.

  2. #42
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    It's very good.



    Ta Ta



    Marky B




  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: Spain Rowdon's Avatar
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    I started to google and snoop around for the answer, but got distracted by other art and artists...



    There's not much of Hurry's art on the net without registering or, God forbid, paying, but I do hope it's him simply because he looks the part, doesn't he?




  4. #44
    Senior Member Country: UK Juniper's Avatar
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    He certainly does.



    Theres an article (taken from a transcript) here that talks about British movie posters. This is the bit about Ealing:



    We're on to Ealing. Ealing deserves an hour to itself. We don't have an hour so I'll have to reduce it to just two posters which is not doing it justice. Ealing Studios hopefully need no introduction. Their films are a very distinctive body of work. They're known for the comedies but they made all kinds of stuff. Run by a guy called Michael Balcon, a very important producer. Balcon had a very middle class sensibility, very philanthropic sort of a guy, who wanted his company to represent everything that was best about Britain.



    He was aspiring to do something a bit more intellectual and unusual than the run of the mill commercial posters. He had an art director called Sidney John Woods. His background's in futurism in the thirties. He would design posters and get other illustrators to do them.



    This was designed by Sidney John Woods, illustrated by AR Thompson. It's a very striking image. It's not necessarily representative of the Ealing posters because a lot of them are a lot more intellectual and difficult than this. They weren't popular with the distributor. Rank didn't like the Ealing posters at all because they thought they were too bloody clever. They wanted something simple and basic to sell the films and often S John Woods would come out with the most bizarre designs that scarcely bore any resemblance to the films they were trying to sell.



    This is another Ealing, 'Lady Killers', the last of the great black comedies from 1955. Design and illustration by Reginald Mount, worked a lot for Ealing, book jacket work. An important artist of his time. Ealing also employed people like Edward Bawden, Edward Ardizzone, Leslie Hurry. These were important contemporary artists, they weren't just hacks, Ealing would employ the most important leading artists of the day to do film posters. They were prepared to pay them more money. At this point before the war there wasn't much money in film posters. Film posters were generally looked down on as a very lowly branch of commercial art because the cinema was a popular entertainment.

  5. #45
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    In my battered copy of The International Poster Annual 1951, Leslie Murray is credited with the poster to "Dead Of Night" on page 55.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Country: Spain Rowdon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by billy bentley
    In my battered copy of The International Poster Annual 1951, Leslie Murray is credited with the poster to "Dead Of Night" on page 55.


    I wonder of they meant "Hurry" rather than "Murray"? A quick look on Google showed a painter called "Leslie Murray" who is female, American and under 30 ...

  7. #47
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    I stand corrected yet again, Rowdon. It does credit Leslie Hurry. Apologies to all, it was fairly late when I looked it up without my glasses on. Leslie Hurry it is.

  8. #48
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    Just rewatching the 1945 masterpiece and no matter how often I watch it the story that really unsettles me the most is the most understated, the story of the Christmas party asnd the little boy who claims his half sister Constance wants to kill him. She's never seen but that is what makes her so menacing!

    I was most curious to know who plays the little boy: imdb doesnt credit him and google only credits him on a couple of sites wrongly as Michael Allen (he in fact plays the older boy at the party). Anyone know who did play him?

    But I was shocked to discover on googling that the story is based on an actual murder case, and Constance Kent herself died a year before the film was made. The actual details are horrendous, and have made this part of the film even more frightening to me now...

  9. #49
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    Just browsing through and read this post. I have "Dead of Night" on DVD, didnt realise this story was based on an actual murder. I am currently reading a very detailed account of this in a book titled "The Suspicions of Mr Whicher or The Murder at Road Hill House" by Kate Summerscale. Mr Whicher was one of the first police detectives and was sent to investigate the case. He suspected the daughter Constance of murdering her little step brother but could not provide some vital evidence. She later confessed to the murder some years later.

  10. #50
    GRAEME
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    Room for one more...
    Both my wife and I recall seeing (separately) a much more lurid colour version of this segment with swirling fog and maniacal laughter - my wife remembers it ending with a crashing lift.

    Any ideas where that may have been?

  11. #51
    Senior Member Country: United States torinfan's Avatar
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    I've not yet viewed it but on the back of the case for "Knock on Wood" it says, "In a parody of the 1946 thriller 'Dead of Night', Kaye is unable to control the words coming out of the mouth of his dummy, resulting in a near-nervous breakdown."

  12. #52
    GRAEME
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    Brought forwrad: Room for one more...
    Both my wife and I recall seeing (separately) a much more lurid colour version of this segment with swirling fog and maniacal laughter - my wife remembers it ending with a crashing lift.

    Any ideas where that may have been?

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Brought forwrad: Room for one more...
    Both my wife and I recall seeing (separately) a much more lurid colour version of this segment with swirling fog and maniacal laughter - my wife remembers it ending with a crashing lift.

    Any ideas where that may have been?
    The Twilight Zone - Twenty Two?

  14. #54
    GRAEME
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainWaggett View Post
    Interesting. I knew about that but I've never seen it. Doesn't mention any credit for E.F. Benson rather that it is based on an "urban legend".

    No, the one I recall had an undertaker on a horse drawn hearse in swirling mist in glorious technicolor...

  15. #55
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Please tell me Ted Turner hasn't been working his sorcery

  16. #56
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRAEME View Post
    Interesting. I knew about that but I've never seen it. Doesn't mention any credit for E.F. Benson rather that it is based on an "urban legend".

    No, the one I recall had an undertaker on a horse drawn hearse in swirling mist in glorious technicolor...
    The death coach sequence in Darby O'Gill and the Little People fits that description, but I don't know about the crashing elevator.

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
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    The story is an urban legend that predates the Benson story.

  18. #58
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Are you sure it wasn't a prophetic dream?

  19. #59
    Senior Member Country: United States will.15's Avatar
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    Maybe this is how the story started (but I suspect not):


    Snopes, the Internet's most prestigious urban legends reference site, traces this story back to 1912. In fact, it dates to the eighteenth century, and it was told as true by one of the most famous British diplomats who ever served Queen Victoria.

    Frederick Temple Hamilton-Temple-Blackwood, 1st Marquess of Dufferin and Ava, was an influential statesman and adventurer, a popular member of the British government and one of the most talented diplomats of his century. His book, Letters From High Latitudes, became the prototype for humorous travelogues, and during his life he served in a variety of posts around the world, including Viceroy of India. He is probably best remembered, however, as the third Governor General of Canada.

    In the mid-1880s, after leaving Canada, Dufferin was visiting a friend at a house near Tullamore in Ireland. One night he found it impossible to sleep. After tossing and turning and trying to read, he got up and crossed to the window to look outside. It was a full moon, and the garden below was almost as brightly lit as it would be by daylight. As he stood there a movement caught his eye and he was surprised to see a strange man carrying a long box on his back, crossing the lawn. He realized suddenly that the man was carrying a coffin, though he couldn't imagine any reason why someone should be carrying a coffin across the lawn at that hour. The man crossed about halfway, in full view of the window, then stopped and looked up at Dufferin. His appearance was so hideous that the statesman recoiled in horror. Afterwards he wasn't able to describe him exactly, except to say that he was an ugly old man.

    The next day he told his host what he had seen. The man was mystified, and said that there was certainly no reason why anyone should have actually been out there. Neither had the old house the tradition of being haunted. They finally decided it must have been a dream.

    The sequel did not take place for at least five or six years. During the mid-1890s Dufferin served as Ambassador to France. While there he went to a meeting in the Grand Hotel. The stories do not say, specifically, but probably this was the Grand Hotel du Louvre, the original hotel to bear that name. It was built in 1855 and was one of the first buildings in France to boast a steam-driven elevator.

    As the Marquess crossed to the elevator with two or three companions, the doors opened and he was shocked to recognize the elevator operator as the man from his dream all those years ago in Ireland. He stepped back, startling his companions, and waved the elevator to go on without them. It reached the third floor before the cables broke. Everyone inside died in the crash. An investigation into the accident revealed that the elevator operator had been hired only that morning, to replace the regular operator who was out sick. No one knew the strange man's name and he was never identified.

    Lord Dufferin told the story often in his later years. As it was told and retold different versions began to appear. One version was featured in the book Famous Ghost Stories by Bennett Cerf, in 1944. A year later another version appeared in the movie "Dead of Night". By this time, the man carrying a box has become a coachman, driving a hearse. An account that is very near the original appears in the 1959 book Strangely Enough by C. B. Colby.

    An episode of The Twilight Zone inspired by Lord Dufferin's story aired on February 10,1961. Titled "Twenty-Two", it told of a dancer who was hospitalized after an injury. While there she dreamed of following a nurse to room 22, the hospital morgue. When they arrived the nurse turned and said, "room for one more, honey". In this version, instead of an elevator operator, the person from her dream turns out to be a flight attendant on an airplane, which is of course flight 22. She refuses to board, even after the attendant assures her that there is "room for one more, honey." The plane then explodes just after takeoff. It is probably this version which produced the subset of stories where the main character is a woman.

    Peter Underwood, president of Britain's prestigious Ghost Club, mentions this story in his book The A-Z of British Ghosts. He reports that he discussed it with one of Lord Dufferin's descendants, who confirmed that he always told it as a true personal account.

    This tale, once told as true by a prominent statesman, has now been a part of our supernatural lore for over a century. Probably it will continue to be shared and altered as long as people share tales. It is, after all, too good a story not to tell. And if more variations appear (and they will) that's fine. After all, that's the nice thing about urban legends:

    There's always room for one more

  20. #60
    GRAEME
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    Really interesting post Will. Cheers.

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