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  1. #181
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    Everyone, this film can be addictive. Its a detective story, a love story, just something for everyone. I found the caravan scene very poignant for some reason. Like one is uncovering the marvel of life itself, or at least one's heritage.
    It also contains, one of my favourite, humorous moments in a P&P film, or any other for that moment, the villlage idiot.



    In fact, film abounds with good humour throughout, added to which, it is a fine piece of documentation.

  2. #182
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Everyone, this film can be addictive. Its a detective story, a love story, just something for everyone. I found the caravan scene very poignant for some reason. Like one is uncovering the marvel of life itself, or at least one's heritage.
    Although it's not really much of a detective story, not when the culprit reveals himself so early on. Some people have said that it's not so much a whodunit as a whydunit



    And then there are the side tracks and interludes that don't really seem to be anything to do with the story at first. The scene in the wheelwright's yard; the ride on the cart past Colpeper's house and then while Alison and Bob talk of people "missing by enemy action"; the butch lady farmer who's still a maid; bren gun carriers attacking a farm cart; a lecture about the old road; the village idiot; the boy's river battle; pow-wow hill; church service; meeting the other victims, although they're not really as important as the tour around the area; visiting the magistrate; a walk through the woods and a roll in the grass; tea drinking nations unite.



    Even when they're going in to Canterbury on the train and meant to be having the big explanation of why the crimes were committed, there is still no really big accusation and confession. In Canterbury there's the reporting to the police which never happens; the organ; a tour around the cathedral and the bombed out city - but you get a much better view of the cathedral now; the caravan; the friend; the procession



    And somehow everyone gets a resolution and closure - well, almost everyone



    It's a most unusual film, it's a beautiful film, it's very moving and very profound. There's a lot in there and a lot of different people find different reasons for loving it.



    Like all Archers films, the quality is superb, the attention to detail is amazing, even the minor characters seem complete with their own story and reason for being there and doing what they do. The landscape and their surroundings, in the city and in the countryside, is like another character, filmed with love and care



    It is addictive, but it's an addiction that not many people complain about



    Steve

  3. #183
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    My brother was in the background when the Postwoman (a victim of the Glueman) briefly crosses the road from Wickhambreaux Post Ofice. He is playing with other kids on the Bridge

  4. #184
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    My brother was in the background when the Postwoman (a victim of the Glueman) briefly crosses the road from Wickhambreaux Post Ofice. He is playing with other kids on the Bridge
    You mean this one:





    Do we have a name for him? Was he also in the river battle? Do you (or he) know the names of the other boys in that scene?



    We have the names of a lot of the boys and other extras listed on the IMDb, but we're well aware that we might not have all of them.



    The postwoman was of course the wonderful actress Judith Furse. Here she was playing Dorothy Bird. She played Sister Briony in Powell & Pressburger's Black Narcissus and she was Doctor Crow in Carry on Spying.



    And that pretty young lass in the big sun hat is Alison Smith, played by Sheila Sim aka Lady Attenborough





    Have you been to Wickhambreaux recently? It's still a lovely place.



    Steve

  5. #185
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Although it's not really much of a detective story, not when the culprit reveals himself so early on. Some people have said that it's not so much a whodunit as a whydunit



    And then there are the side tracks and interludes that don't really seem to be anything to do with the story at first. The scene in the wheelwright's yard; the ride on the cart past Colpeper's house and then while Alison and Bob talk of people "missing by enemy action"; the butch lady farmer who's still a maid; bren gun carriers attacking a farm cart; a lecture about the old road; the village idiot; the boy's river battle; pow-wow hill; church service; meeting the other victims, although they're not really as important as the tour around the area; visiting the magistrate; a walk through the woods and a roll in the grass; tea drinking nations unite.



    Even when they're going in to Canterbury on the train and meant to be having the big explanation of why the crimes were committed, there is still no really big accusation and confession. In Canterbury there's the reporting to the police which never happens; the organ; a tour around the cathedral and the bombed out city - but you get a much better view of the cathedral now; the caravan; the friend; the procession



    And somehow everyone gets a resolution and closure - well, almost everyone



    It's a most unusual film, it's a beautiful film, it's very moving and very profound. There's a lot in there and a lot of different people find different reasons for loving it.



    Like all Archers films, the quality is superb, the attention to detail is amazing, even the minor characters seem complete with their own story and reason for being there and doing what they do. The landscape and their surroundings, in the city and in the countryside, is like another character, filmed with love and care



    It is addictive, but it's an addiction that not many people complain about



    Steve
    The train journey to Canterbury is what would have been in the days of the film's release a modern-day version of the original Pilgrimage. The resolution and closure is a metaphor for redemption. I see this topic becoming a big discussion thread regarding other Powell and Pressburger works.

  6. #186
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    The train journey to Canterbury is what would have been in the days of the film's release a modern-day version of the original Pilgrimage. The resolution and closure is a metaphor for redemption. I see this topic becoming a big discussion thread regarding other Powell and Pressburger works.
    That's why the prologue works so well, showing the continuation from Chaucerian pilgrims to modern day pilgrims travelling on the road of steel



    The Knight releases his falcon and looks up to it





    The falcon transforms into a Spitfire and we're in the 1940s, but it's still the same person looking up at the skies, even though his costume has changed





    And yes, they do all get redemption of a sort. Peter plays the Cathedral organ, Bob & Alison find that their girlfriend and boyfriend aren't "lost by enemy action", and even Colpeper realises his mistake and lets the soldiers bring their girlfriends to his lectures (under the closing credits)



    Steve

  7. #187
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    You mean this one:





    Do we have a name for him? Was he also in the river battle? Do you (or he) know the names of the other boys in that scene?



    We have the names of a lot of the boys and other extras listed on the IMDb, but we're well aware that we might not have all of them.



    The postwoman was of course the wonderful actress Judith Furse. Here she was playing Dorothy Bird. She played Sister Briony in Powell & Pressburger's Black Narcissus and she was Doctor Crow in Carry on Spying.



    And that pretty young lass in the big sun hat is Alison Smith, played by Sheila Sim aka Lady Attenborough





    Have you been to Wickhambreaux recently? It's still a lovely place.



    Steve
    Thanks Steve for that picture My brothers name is Andrew Timpson and he is mentioned in Paul Tritton's Book. I will have to ask him who the others were.

    My brother is 10 years older (I was born 1948) and we both lived in Wickhambreaux. He was not involved in the river battle, which I understand was at Chilham Mill and Juliberrie Hill.

    The train journey has been mentioned here. Selling station, is used but I believe a short section of the journey shows the LimeKiln Quarry on the Elham Valley line between Canterbury South and Harbledown Junction.

  8. #188
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    I'm hoping to make the Canterbury walk this year as it's Chilham, Judith Furse lived in neighbouring Shottenden and I'm wondering if she's buried at Chilham Churchyard as that's the nearest Church so all being well I'll be at Chilham a couple of hours before the meet to have a search for her grave.

  9. #189
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I'm hoping to make the Canterbury walk this year as it's Chilham, Judith Furse lived in neighbouring Shottenden and I'm wondering if she's buried at Chilham Churchyard as that's the nearest Church so all being well I'll be at Chilham a couple of hours before the meet to have a search for her grave.
    Good ho, see you there.



    It might be worth contacting the church, or the local authority, beforehand. They often have records which they can search quite easily



    Steve

  10. #190
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    BBC - Kent - History - A Canterbury Tale: introduction



    Nice little video attachment included with this, check it out, and see if you can spot anyone we know

  11. #191
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    BBC - Kent - History - A Canterbury Tale: introduction



    Nice little video attachment included with this, check it out, and see if you can spot anyone we know
    Ah, one of my many appearances before the world's media

    There are a few more clips of our walk and interviews with people on it.



    This one was shown on BBC South East as part of the build up to the screening of A Canterbury Tale - in Canterbury Cathedral. That really was an amazing evening.



    There's a nice documentary on the Criterion DVD of A Canterbury Tale - called A Canterbury Trail - where I can be seen and heard as well, along with a load of other people on an earlier walk.




    Steve

  12. #192
    Senior Member HUGHJAMPTON's Avatar
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    Ah, one of my many appearances before the world's media

    There are a few more clips of our walk



    There's a nice documentary on the Criterion DVD of A Canterbury Tale - called A Canterbury Trail - where I can be seen and heard as well, along with a load of other people on an earlier walk.



    Steve
    Worth investing in, just for that. You're enthusiasm does you credit, Steve, and thank you for that



    Is Paul's book still available?

  13. #193
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Worth investing in, just for that. You're enthusiasm does you credit, Steve, and thank you for that



    Is Paul's book still available?
    The one on the Criterion DVD is when David Thompson, a BBC director/producer, came with us on the 2005 location walk and filmed us and interviewed some of us. As that was Powell's centenary year we did a special walk looking at the places where he'd grown up around Canterbury.



    The 2nd edition of Paul's book is available as a "print on demand" service. The printer can set things up quite quickly to just print off one or two copies as and when required. The wonders of modern technology



    Steve

  14. #194
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    Has anyone ever noticed the similarities between 'A Canterbury Tale' and 'Tawny Pipit'? The latter is quite hard to get hold of, never officially released on video or DVD to my knowledge (my bootleg copy came via a kind Britmovie member), which is a great shame, because although it can't claim to be in the same league as the former (undisputed grade A masterpiece) it's full of charm.



    Both films are partly hymns to the English countryside, are set in slightly eccentric rural communities, feature urban visitors who are changed by their experience, have scenes featuring tanks and lectures, feature young boys... I'm sure there are other parallels. Must be enough material for a thesis.

  15. #195
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    Has anyone ever noticed the similarities between 'A Canterbury Tale' and 'Tawny Pipit'? The latter is quite hard to get hold of, never officially released on video or DVD to my knowledge (my bootleg copy came via a kind Britmovie member), which is a great shame, because although it can't claim to be in the same league as the former (undisputed grade A masterpiece) it's full of charm.



    Both films are partly hymns to the English countryside, are set in slightly eccentric rural communities, feature urban visitors who are changed by their experience, have scenes featuring tanks and lectures, feature young boys... I'm sure there are other parallels. Must be enough material for a thesis.
    I have noticed the similarity. It has been shown on TV set in the Cotswolds if I remember. The film is not lauded like ACT

  16. #196
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Has anyone ever noticed the similarities between 'A Canterbury Tale' and 'Tawny Pipit'? The latter is quite hard to get hold of, never officially released on video or DVD to my knowledge (my bootleg copy came via a kind Britmovie member), which is a great shame, because although it can't claim to be in the same league as the former (undisputed grade A masterpiece) it's full of charm.



    Both films are partly hymns to the English countryside, are set in slightly eccentric rural communities, feature urban visitors who are changed by their experience, have scenes featuring tanks and lectures, feature young boys... I'm sure there are other parallels. Must be enough material for a thesis.
    Make it a three way comparison with Great Day (1945) which also has a lot in common with A Canterbury Tale and then you probably do have enough for a thesis



    Steve

  17. #197
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    I watched A Canterbury Tale again today - my favourite film that doesn't star Jenny.

    A wonderful evocation of a lost England. It means so much to me because my mother was born not far from "The Pilgrim Road", was a little older than Sylvia Sim and served in the WARF during the war - probably in Kent but I'm not sure. I was also born not too far away from "The Pilgrim Road" and remember being taken up onto it by my grandfather when I was quite young. One day, I'll have to make another visit.

    Certainly worth watching for anyone who hasn't seen it - and those who have!

  18. #198
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fellwanderer View Post
    I watched A Canterbury Tale again today - my favourite film that doesn't star Jenny.

    A wonderful evocation of a lost England. It means so much to me because my mother was born not far from "The Pilgrim Road", was a little older than Sylvia Sim and served in the WARF during the war - probably in Kent but I'm not sure. I was also born not too far away from "The Pilgrim Road" and remember being taken up onto it by my grandfather when I was quite young. One day, I'll have to make another visit.

    Certainly worth watching for anyone who hasn't seen it - and those who have!
    Sylvia Sim? Sylvia Syms or Sheila Sim?
    They have both commented many times over the years about the way their names have been confused

    WARF? Do you mean WRAF?

    Which Pilgrims' Road(s)? There are a lot of them, all over the country. There were many routes to salvation

    Steve

  19. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Sylvia Sim? Sylvia Syms or Sheila Sim?
    They have both commented many times over the years about the way their names have been confused

    WARF? Do you mean WRAF?

    Which Pilgrims' Road(s)? There are a lot of them, all over the country. There were many routes to salvation

    Steve
    Sheila Sim of course - I'd even checked her dob to see how close she was to my mother. Fingers work faster than my brain! Same goes for WRAF!

    I used "The Pilgrim Road" in italics deliberately as the best known route is The Pilgrims' Way - which was the one I was meaning and was certainly the route Chaucer and P&P were using.

  20. #200
    Senior Member Country: UK flynn's Avatar
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    i have to agree a great film worth watching many times over.
    you should get criterion collection of A Canterbury Tale.
    with Steve showing the locations used in the film.
    by the way i will have a pint of what Fellwanderer been Drinking.

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