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  1. #221
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    If it is, he's a long way from home. I said it was at Saunton Sands, that's in north Devon
    It's also a dog, not a cat

    Steve

  2. #222
    GRAEME
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    If it is, he's a long way from home. I said it was at Saunton Sands, that's in north Devon
    It's also a dog, not a cat

    Steve
    The Essex Lion was no lion.

    Looks pantherish to me...

  3. #223
    Senior Member Country: England Tonch's Avatar
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    Spot on GRAEME, instead of pratting about with his camera, Steve should be running for his life.

    The beast has already mauled to death at least one victim as clearly shown at the right hand edge of the photo!!

  4. #224
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I didn't realise it was a full moon tonight

    Steve

  5. #225
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    I had just about worked out where they filmed from by lining up on the headlands. I turned round to look at the dunes - and a black Labrador ran down towards me - just like in the film. Sometimes the magic just works

    ...
    "Oh, I'd always hoped there would be dogs."

    Steve
    Oh I love this. And that is one of my favorite lines in the film.

  6. #226
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Westengland, that's the joy of location hunting, or one of them. After 60+ years quite a lot has probably changed. Some building will have been pulled down or extended. New building may have been erected. Some trees may have died or been uprooted, other trees may have grown. Roads may have been widened or even have their routes changed. But hills don't tend to move much

    But the main joy is when you find something that is still very recognisable. A lot of the locations from this film in the villages and countryside around Canterbury are like that. Canterbury itself has changed quite a lot. The Luftwaffe ha a go at redesigning it, but the city council did more damage since the war. But even there, there's a lot that is still recognisable from the film

    However, my prize find was when I was exploring Saunton Sands, the beach where David Niven is washed ashore in A Matter of Life and Death. There are still extensive sand dunes behind the beach, which is in a big bay. I had just about worked out where they filmed from by lining up on the headlands. I turned round to look at the dunes - and a black Labrador ran down towards me - just like in the film. Sometimes the magic just works


    "Oh, I'd always hoped there would be dogs."

    Steve

    I LOVE THIS SHOT. A marvelous coincidence. Thanks for sharing it, Steve.

  7. #227
    Member Country: England
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    An all time classic and wondeful film. Although the war was truly horrible English social history films such as this portray a better England than we have today. I got my DVD ages ago and watch it regularly.

  8. #228
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cardinal Wolsey View Post
    An all time classic and wondeful film. Although the war was truly horrible English social history films such as this portray a better England than we have today. I got my DVD ages ago and watch it regularly.
    Is that the Carlton DVD with the mistake on the cover?

    Steve

  9. #229
    Senior Member Country: England
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    I have a particular affection for this film as it was one of my father's favourites. He was based in Canterbury during the war, prior to being commissioned. He was a quiet man, but I remember watching this with him once and when Dennis Price goes to the cathedral alone, and the organ is playing (a scene I've always taken as 'this is what we're fighting for'). Dad said, with a smile on his face 'I did that..'.

  10. #230
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Staffsyeoman View Post
    I have a particular affection for this film as it was one of my father's favourites. He was based in Canterbury during the war, prior to being commissioned. He was a quiet man, but I remember watching this with him once and when Dennis Price goes to the cathedral alone, and the organ is playing (a scene I've always taken as 'this is what we're fighting for'). Dad said, with a smile on his face 'I did that..'.
    That was the message of the whole film. The boy's river battle, the hop yards and villages around Canterbury. The people, even the eccentrics like Colpeper. The land and its history.

    Colpeper's Speech



    There are more ways than one of getting close to your ancestors. Follow the old road, and as you walk, think of them and of the old England. They climbed Chillingbourne Hill, just as you did. They sweated and paused for breath, just as you did today. And when you see the bluebells in the spring, and the wild thyme, the broom and the heather. You're only seeing what their eyes saw. You ford the same rivers, same birds are singing, and when you lie flat on your back, and rest, and watch the clouds sailing, as I often do, you're so close to those other pilgrims, that you can hear the thrumming of the hoofs of their horses and the sound of the wheels on the road, and their laughter, and talk, and the music of the instruments they carried. And when I turn the bend in the road, where they too, saw the towers of Canterbury, I feel I've only to turn my head, to see them on the road behind me.
    It's a curious film. It starts off as a bit of a mystery but it's not a whodunit because we're quickly told who dun it. It turns into a why done it. You have to slow down to the film's pace, but if you do, then it rewards you with a lot of lovely interwoven stories.

    It wasn't a big hit when it was first released. It did OK, it made a profit but it didn't break any box-office records. I suppose people had other things to think about like finishing off the war and wondering what to do after it was over. But over the years since then it's developed a steadily growing audience and fan base.

    We have a Location Walk on the last Sunday in August. All are welcome

    Steve

  11. #231
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    It's more than time for this wonderful film to be moved back to the head of the line here. I found this video of Alison's vision on youtube. It is one of my favorite scenes in any film - it never fails to move me.

    This forum and Steve Crook introduced me to this film. I will always be thankful for that.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAlSL73zcxc

  12. #232
    Member Country: Wales Trog's Avatar
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    I think my favourite parts in this excellent film are when the American sergeant is looking out of his hotel window and talking to the boy who is the same height as him because he is standing on a wagon load of hay and when the sergeant is having the conversation about timber with the local and they discover that their methods are virtually the same despite coming from places thousands of miles apart.

  13. #233
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Check out the Powell & Pressburger site closer to the end of August for details of the annual A Canterbury Tale Location Walk. It's on the last Sunday in August every year, that's the weekend when the film was set. This year that'll 31 August. Note: that's not the bank-holiday weekend this year

    Steve

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