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  1. #181
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick C View Post
    Devotees of the Powell and Pressburger movement (of which I am one) might like to be aware of this radio documentary shortly

    BBC Radio 3, Saturday 2 April
    Music scores related to Powell and Pressburger collaboration
    3-4 pm

    Can't see on the BBC website more info than in Radio Times just yet.
    Thanks Rick,
    My radios are usually just tuned to BBC Radio 4 but I'll tune in to that

    Steve

  2. #182
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick C View Post
    Devotees of the Powell and Pressburger movement (of which I am one) might like to be aware of this radio documentary shortly

    BBC Radio 3, Saturday 2 April
    Music scores related to Powell and Pressburger collaboration
    3-4 pm

    Can't see on the BBC website more info than in Radio Times just yet.
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b075p03z

    Sound of Cinema: Powell and Pressburger
    Matthew Sweet looks at music for the films of Michael Powell and Emeric Pressburger who created some of Britain's best loved and innovative classic films.
    The programme features music from "The 49th Parallel"; "A Matter of Life and Death"; "Black Narcissus" - and the Classic Score of the Week, Brian Easdale's music for "The Red Shoes".

    Steve

  3. #183
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The Technicolor restoration.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cjv755LkaIE

  4. #184
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    The Technicolor restoration.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cjv755LkaIE
    An amazing piece of work.

    The first one they restored was The Red Shoes
    They tried to restore it photochemically at first but when that didn't work they did it digitally. Scanning each frame (3 times as many frames as you see on screen in 3 Strip Technicolor) plus the optical soundtrack. Then they cleaned them up, cleaning off the scratches and even the moulds growing on the negatives. Then they put them back together allowing for some strips shrinking or stretching at different rates. They also cleaned up the optical soundtrack getting rid of the hisses and pops. Then they restored the colour back to the original Technicolor colours (with the help of Jack Cardiff who was still alive at that point)

    It's no wonder it took many years and cost a few million dollars, but it was well worth it. The results are stunning

    The lovely Natacha & I were invited to the premi�re of the restored print at the Cannes Film Festival in 2009. They were going to show it in one of the smaller theatres but so many people wanted to see it that they showed it in the main Brunuel Theatre. While we were waiting for it to start we looked around, counting the Oscar winners in the audience. We lost count after 20 or 30

    Then it was off to dinner with Martin Scorsese, Thelma Schoonmaker, Tilda Swinton and various others - what a day


    After TRS they used what they head learned restoring that to restore Blimp and then The Tales of Hoffmann which they were able to do (slightly) faster and (slightly) cheaper

    Steve

  5. #185
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Yes, an amazing piece of work, Steve. It proves that if you are prepared to spend enough money and time and have the talented people to do it, it can be done, although it's so expensive that it can only be done on a limited number of films. I like Michael Powell calling the old, huge 3-strip Technicolor camera 'The Enchanted Cottage'. It sounds like you had a nice time at the premiere of the restored print in Cannes.

  6. #186
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Yes, an amazing piece of work, Steve. It proves that if you are prepared to spend enough money and time and have the talented people to do it, it can be done, although it's so expensive that it can only be done on a limited number of films. I like Michael Powell calling the old, huge 3-strip Technicolor camera 'The Enchanted Cottage'.
    But it also shows what is involved in doing a full restoration of a film which puts the lie to that frequently misused term when people say that a film has been restored when usually they mean that another print has been made from the same tired old negatives

    It sounds like you had a nice time at the premiere of the restored print in Cannes.
    It was great, the best time, words find it hard to describe it

    Steve

  7. #187
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Steve.
    Did Martin say why he became so enthusiastically involved in the restoration of some quirky old British films (I mean this not as a put down but in an international sense and the fact the subjects were worlds away from what Scorsese usually deals with)

  8. #188
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bert Quark View Post
    Steve.
    Did Martin say why he became so enthusiastically involved in the restoration of some quirky old British films (I mean this not as a put down but in an international sense and the fact the subjects were worlds away from what Scorsese usually deals with)
    Because he greatly admired the films of Powell & Pressburger having seen them shown on old B&W TV in the days when he was housebound. He worked with and socialised with Micky Powell for many years and has often acknowledged their influence on his own films.

    Are their films quirky old British films? Or are they major pieces of film-making that were (& still are) world renowned?

    Martin introduced his long time editor, Thelma Schoonmaker, to Micky and they later married. When Thelma came to Canterbury for the dedication of the Powell Building at Canterbury Christ Church she gave a lecture detailing how Marty never just copied P&P films but that a LOT of them had major influences on him. Marty would watch the P&P films, inwardly digest and consider the scenes and then produce his own scenes in his own way - but he gladly acknowledges the influence that P&P in general and certain P&P scenes in particular had on him & his films. The article linked to above gives loads of examples from Thelma's lecture

    The restorations started because Thelma had tried to buy a print of Blimp for Marty's 60th birthday only to find out that it was badly damaged with moulds growing on the negatives and the different strips of the 3 strip Technicolor had shrunk or stretched at different rates

    Marty & Thelma were amongst the guests of honour when we erected the English Heritage Blue Plaque dedicated to Powell & Pressburger in February 2014

    Steve

  9. #189
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    I went to see War and Peace when it was originally released on the ABC circuit in 1957 and, although it ran 208 minutes (3 and a half hours), it seemed to last a lot longer. It just went on and on and on ...
    Was it presented with an intermission?

    I know that those blockbusters from the 1950s and 60s were presented with intermissions and overtures and 'exit music' etc but I get the impression that most longer films from the 80s and 90s are presented without an intermission.

  10. #190
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    I know that the 238 minute long Gone With The Wind had one definite break in the story for its intermission.

    But the 163 minute long The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp was in three definite parts; I wonder if it was presented with one intermission?

  11. #191
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    Was it presented with an intermission?

    I know that those blockbusters from the 1950s and 60s were presented with intermissions and overtures and 'exit music' etc but I get the impression that most longer films from the 80s and 90s are presented without an intermission.
    No

    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    I know that the 238 minute long Gone With The Wind had one definite break in the story for its intermission.

    But the 163 minute long The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp was in three definite parts; I wonder if it was presented with one intermission?
    and no

    Steve

  12. #192
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    I can't remember War and Peace having an intermission, but it is a very long time ago now.

  13. #193
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang"(1968) was shown with an intermission, just as the car goes off the white cliffs and is heading to crash onto the beach, if I recall correctly.

    My sister worked as an usherette in a cinema showing "Gone With The Wind" (on a re-release in the 1970s) and had the task of selling ice-creams from a shoulder-harness tray at the front of the stalls. The Manager told her to time her walk to the front so that she could get there just as the house lights went up to start selling straight away. She asked "How will I know when to start walking?", he told her "Scarlett makes a speech, she's hit rock bottom but she's going to fight back", "But when?", "Start walking when she picks up a carrot". So she's watching this film for the first time, really getting into the story but realising that the time for the intermission is coming up - scratching her head, wondering how or why the actress could ever pick up a carrot - when Vivian Leigh raises Bug's favourite vegetable high in the air and my sister leaps into action. She strides down the aisle and switches the light on in her ice-cream tray, turns around and smiles just as the cinema curtains close and the lights come up on a suitably enthused audience who then flock to buy the ice-creams. The manager knew his trade.

  14. #194
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    I can't remember War and Peace having an intermission, but it is a very long time ago now.
    There's some debate about it on the IMDb entry.

  15. #195
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by StoneAgeMan View Post
    "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang"(1968) was shown with an intermission, just as the car goes off the white cliffs and is heading to crash onto the beach, if I recall correctly.

    My sister worked as an usherette in a cinema showing "Gone With The Wind" (on a re-release in the 1970s) and had the task of selling ice-creams from a shoulder-harness tray at the front of the stalls. The Manager told her to time her walk to the front so that she could get there just as the house lights went up to start selling straight away. She asked "How will I know when to start walking?", he told her "Scarlett makes a speech, she's hit rock bottom but she's going to fight back", "But when?", "Start walking when she picks up a carrot". So she's watching this film for the first time, really getting into the story but realising that the time for the intermission is coming up - scratching her head, wondering how or why the actress could ever pick up a carrot - when Vivian Leigh raises Bug's favourite vegetable high in the air and my sister leaps into action. She strides down the aisle and switches the light on in her ice-cream tray, turns around and smiles just as the cinema curtains close and the lights come up on a suitably enthused audience who then flock to buy the ice-creams. The manager knew his trade.
    Nothing better for sales than an intermission. The front of house staff didn't like them because it meant keeping the kiosk open later than normal, thus delaying their cashing up and departure.

  16. #196
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by odeonman View Post
    There's some debate about it on the IMDb entry.
    Whereabouts? I keep an eye on the Blimp Message Board and there's no sign of it there recently

    Steve

  17. #197
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Whereabouts? I keep an eye on the Blimp Message Board and there's no sign of it there recently

    Steve
    They talk about 'War and Peace' on the Blimp Message Board?

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