Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 60 of 197
  1. #41
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    I noticed when I was on Patrick Macnee's website that his film debut was in Blimp.

    Macnee went on to win a scholarship to Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art and got his start in show business in 1941 with a small role in a stage production of Little Women. One year later he made his debut in films as an extra in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

    Life


    Anyone spotted him?





  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: United States
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,579
    Liked
    0 times
    Not I! I will pay closer this weekend. We've been volunteered for another lecture-series trial run on the film, and maybe we can have some kind of prize for the Patrick McNee sighting. A cane and a hat? Hmmm...

  3. #43
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    name='Moor Larkin']I noticed when I was on Patrick Macnee's website that his film debut was in Blimp.



    Macnee went on to win a scholarship to Webber Douglas Academy of Dramatic Art and got his start in show business in 1941 with a small role in a stage production of Little Women. One year later he made his debut in films as an extra in The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

    Life

    Anyone spotted him?



    I never have, and I've been looking out for him whenever I've seen it over the last few years. I do suspect that he might have worked on it but not made the final edit. He might have been one of the soldiers in Spud's troop or in a crowd scene like at the Berlin cafe. I've been told that he doesn't mention Blimp in his autobiography. He was in the Navy while it was being filmed and they weren't given permission to use any service personnel. But they weren't meant to be using all those army trucks or uniforms either.



    Macnee was in The Small Back Room, The Elusive Pimpernel and The Battle of the River Plate so he wasn't unknown to Powell & Pressburger. But was he known to them back in 1943?



    Steve

  4. #44
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    Well. I had never seen it. How can I have lived all these years and not done so. My parents must be punished.........



    After the first ten or fifteen minutes, I was beginning to think those guys on Britmovie have sold me a dud here........



    Suffice to say I was fighting for breath by the end........



    I hope those old cinema carpets were waterproof........



    Deborah Kerr must have had a great time. Three roles in one movie!! Her final 'chipper' youngster was brilliant.



    Thanks guys......




  5. #45
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    Well. I had never seen it. How can I have lived all these years and not done so. My parents must be punished.........


    Not necessarily....Blimp was only available to be seen in a truncated - by 43 minutes - version until restoration in 1981.

  6. #46
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    Well. I had never seen it. How can I have lived all these years and not done so. My parents must be punished.........



    After the first ten or fifteen minutes, I was beginning to think those guys on Britmovie have sold me a dud here........



    Suffice to say I was fighting for breath by the end........



    I hope those old cinema carpets were waterproof........



    Deborah Kerr must have had a great time. Three roles in one movie!! Her final 'chipper' youngster was brilliant.



    Thanks guys......



    The start is a bit of a slow burn on the high drama, but it has plenty of time to develop that. The opening is interesting and unusual (as are the openings of most P&P films) with things like the despatch riders and it slowly draws you in to an epic story.



    Yes, Deborah must have had a great time. But what about Roger Livesey and Anton Walbrook? They had to show the same characters ageing over that same period. Roger especially, the way he loses his hair and puts on all that weight.



    Scorsese got De Niro to watch it before they made Raging Bull where Jake La Motta undergoes a similar transformation. They asked Micky Powell how Roger Livesey did it and he said "Through skilful use of make-up, and good acting". But De Niro, being schooled in "the method" decided to put the weight on for real.



    But what about Anton's speeches? The one at the tribunal explaining the rise of Nazism and the other one after Clive's broadcast is cancelled, explaining why Nazism must be fought. A stunning piece of work from Anton.



    And the cheek of making a film during the blitz where the British hero's best friend is a German!



    Steve

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: Australia
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    3,099
    Liked
    1 times
    For those living in Australia - I was able to buy a three DVD "Silver Screen Collection" set that included 'The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp', 'The Day Will Dawn' (1952) and 'Secret Mission' (1942) from my local Woolworths Supermarket for $8.90. Thats around 3.60 sterling. Excellent value.



    There are currently eight releases in the "Silver Screen Collection" all around the same price. Titles include -



    1.Morning Departure, In Which We Serve, We Dive At Dawn.

    2.Operation Amsterdam, A Town Like Alice, The Silver Fleet

    4.The Heroes Of Telemark, Reach For The Sky, Malta Story

    5.The Battle Of The River Plate, Above Us The Waves, 49th Parallel

    6.Appointment With Venus, The Flemish Farm, The Way Ahead

    7.King Soloman's Mines, North West Frontier, Ferry To Hong Kong

    8. Morcambe and Wise Film Collection.



    Let's hope that this is the start of more vintage British film releases over here at a good price.



    Dave.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    6,472
    Liked
    120 times
    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    Not necessarily....Blimp was only available to be seen in a truncated - by 43 minutes - version until restoration in 1981.
    Only myself to blame then.......



    Quote Originally Posted by stevecrook
    what about Roger Livesey especially, the way he loses his hair and puts on all that weight. Scorsese got De Niro to watch it before they made Raging Bull where Jake La Motta undergoes a similar transformation. They asked Micky Powell how Roger Livesey did it and he said "Through skilful use of make-up, and good acting". But De Niro, being schooled in "the method" decided to put the weight on for real.
    Reminds me of the story told by the man in a suitcase when he was punching himself to look authentic and one of his 'decadent' British co-stars remarked, "Why don't you just act it old chap?"........ (To his credit I think Richard Bradford was the one who told the story).



    Quote Originally Posted by stevecrook'
    But what about Anton's speeches? The one at the tribunal explaining the rise of Nazism and the other one after Clive's broadcast is cancelled, explaining why Nazism must be fought. A stunning piece of work from Anton.
    Cue the wet carpet, that, and the trauma of Roger meeting the same beautiful girl over and over again.........



    And the cheek of making a film during the blitz where the British hero's best friend is a German!
    To be fair to Winston, it wasn't really the sort of thing to ginger up the troops (especially the ones at home) was it. I'm not sure intellectual rigour has that much place until after you've retired from the battlefield........



    Speaking of ginger? Where did they find all those red-heads and ginger-nuts to show the Technicolor at it's most fulsome???




  9. #49
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    To be fair to Winston, it wasn't really the sort of thing to ginger up the troops (especially the ones at home) was it. I'm not sure intellectual rigour has that much place until after you've retired from the battlefield........



    Speaking of ginger? Where did they find all those red-heads and ginger-nuts to show the Technicolor at it's most fulsome???



    The main aim (or one of them) was to show that the British Army was no longer class bound and run by "Colonel Blimp" types. That they still existed, but that they now knew that they had to change - that's why the title mentions the "death of Colonel Blimp". I think that would have been appreciated and understood by most of the troops that saw it.



    Churchill complained about it long before he saw it, or even saw the full story. His early complaints were based on an inaccurate synopsis by a civil servant. But when he did finally see it, he didn't like it. Anton was appearing in the stage play "Watch on the Rhine" while the film was still in production (he had to leave Denham studios early on matin�e days) and Churchill was trying to get it stopped. A blustering, red faced (Blimp like?) Churchill proceeded to berate Anton saying "What's this supposed to mean? I suppose you regard it as good propaganda for Britain?" Anton calmly replied "No people in the world other than the English would have had the courage, in the midst of war, to tell the people such unvarnished truth."



    As for the red heads, most of them were natural. Roger Livesey's certainly was - before he shaved it. Deborah's was as well. Powell did have a thing for redheads.



    Steve

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,515
    Liked
    243 times
    Watching Blimp fully for the first time yesterday two things struck me. The first was the black motorcyle rider who carried Blimp through the battlefield. Although many thousands of Black and coloured men fought in WW1, very few had been featured in either film or newsreels.



    The second and more fascinating turn up was the newspaper Blimp was reading after the end of WW1. The paper was dated 1919 and one headline read 'Murder in Liverpool' and the word 'drowned' in the article.

    1919 was a time of race riots in some of the port and major cities across Britain. The background of this was that many Blacks and Asians, either resident in Britain or from the Colonies had enlisted in the Army or had found work on Merchant Navy ships, replacing the white seamen who had joined the Royal Navy. Many also found work in the docks and factories supporting the war effort. The end of WW1 caused unrest when many Blacks and Asians lost their jobs to the returning white ex-servicemen. In Liverpool the stabbing of a West Indian by 2 Scandinavians led to more violence which eventually resulted in the death of Charles Wooten, a 24 year old Caribbean sailor who was thrown into Queens Dock by a mob where he was stoned as he tried to swim to safety. He died in the water. This is what I am assuming the article is about. In Cardiff the violence led to three deaths and many more injured. The aftermath of these riots led to the government repatriating hundreds of unemployed Black and Indian workers, including I would assume soldiers and sailors, many of whom had their British Citizenship revoked.



    Was the newspaper,date and article a subtle way of Pressburger's (who had entered Britain on a stateless passport) of reminding us that you needn't have been born in this country to want to fight for it. And in peacetime we should all remember that.

    As Steve has mentoned in the previous post "No people in the world other than the English would have had the courage, in the midst of war, to tell the people such unvarnished truth."





    regards



    Freddy

  11. #51
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Freddy
    Watching Blimp fully for the first time yesterday two things struck me. The first was the black motorcyle rider who carried Blimp through the battlefield. Although many thousands of Black and coloured men fought in WW1, very few had been featured in either film or newsreels.



    The second and more fascinating turn up was the newspaper Blimp was reading after the end of WW1. The paper was dated 1919 and one headline read 'Murder in Liverpool' and the word 'drowned' in the article.

    1919 was a time of race riots in some of the port and major cities across Britain. The background of this was that many Blacks and Asians, either resident in Britain or from the Colonies had enlisted in the Army or had found work on Merchant Navy ships, replacing the white seamen who had joined the Royal Navy. Many also found work in the docks and factories supporting the war effort. The end of WW1 caused unrest when many Blacks and Asians lost their jobs to the returning white ex-servicemen. In Liverpool the stabbing of a West Indian by 2 Scandinavians led to more violence which eventually resulted in the death of Charles Wooten, a 24 year old Caribbean sailor who was thrown into Queens Dock by a mob where he was stoned as he tried to swim to safety. He died in the water. This is what I am assuming the article is about. In Cardiff the violence led to three deaths and many more injured. The aftermath of these riots led to the government repatriating hundreds of unemployed Black and Indian workers, including I would assume soldiers and sailors, many of whom had their British Citizenship revoked.



    Was the newspaper,date and article a subtle way of Pressburger's (who had entered Britain on a stateless passport) of reminding us that you needn't have been born in this country to want to fight for it. And in peacetime we should all remember that.

    As Steve has mentoned in the previous post "No people in the world other than the English would have had the courage, in the midst of war, to tell the people such unvarnished truth."





    regards



    Freddy
    The black motorcycle rider is a fascinating character. Remember that that scene was in WWI and most coloured Americans were only allowed to act as drivers and other jobs behind the lines. There were a few fighting units (segregated), but only a few. It wasn't that much different in WWII.



    The motorcyclist is played by Norris Smith. He didn't get an on screen credit in Blimp but a lot of people in short roles like his didn't get one either. Norris's only other known appearance on screen is in Diamond City (1949) which starred David Farrar and Niall MacGinnis (both P&P regulars) and Diana Dors.



    Some people have said he over-does the "Yessir, massah" and comes over a bit too like an Uncle Tom character. We don't know if that was how he was directed, how he chose to do it or if that's how black Americans had to act at the time to survive in the American military.



    As for the newspaper, I'd never read the rest of it. I only read the bit about "No more khaki for the looms" which is the part relevant to the story. But checking it on a DVD, it doesn't seem to be about the case you mention.



    It's from the Bradford Daily Telegraph of Friday, June 6th 1919 (yes, it was a Friday).

    The main headline of "Liverpool Murder" is followed by a few other sub-headlines which say:

    Suspect Found in River

    Inquest on Artilleryman Home on leave

    An Open Verdict



    So it was a gunner that died, not a sailor. And it was the suspect found in the river, not the victim. A bit further down there's another sub-heading that says "...Eight Days in the Water"



    But that's not to say that the case you mention, and probably others like it, didn't happen. Although big ports like Liverpool, London & Cardiff were fairly well integrated and had been for years, something like the end of the war and the people that had been away fighting coming home and wanting their old jobs back would be sure to cause some problems.



    Steve

  12. #52
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    It's available on various DVDs.

    The Carlton DVD includes a 25 minute documentary A Profile of 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp'

    The Criterion DVD includes the Carlton documentary plus commentary by Scorsese and Powell (made for the Criterion laserdisc)

    The L'Institut Lumi�re DVD is a double DVD, the first contains the film with the original soundtrack (so mainly in English) with optional French subtitles plus an introduction by Bertrand Tavernier (in French with optional English subtitles) plus the original trailers for Le Narcisse Noir, Les Chaussons Rouges & 49e Parall�le

    The 2nd disk contains:

    Memories of Michael (Part 2) by Thelma Schoonmaker-Powell

    (In English with French subtitles); 12 min;

    A Daring Adventurer (Part 3) by Bertrand Tavernier

    (In French with English subtitles); 20 min

    A Profile of 'Colonel Blimp'

    (In English with French subtitles); 26 min (Prod Carlton)

    The Making of an Englishman

    A documentary by Kevin Macdonald about Emeric Pressburger

    (In English with French subtitles); 51 min

    + A luxurious 48 page leaflet (en Fran�ais)

  13. #53
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    Powell always prided himself in the amount of research taken to get the details right in Blimp; for instance the first interview at Military Intelligence, there's a copy of The Strand on the table, the Chief asks about Hound of the Baskervilles...at the right part in the plot for the serialisation, on the date the interview is set.

    Is Norris Smith going over the top?? Perhaps, but as he was born in 1883, he would have known better than anyone now how Southern States black males would have behaved back then...

  14. #54
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    2,281
    Liked
    0 times
    when blimp is in the turkish bath is Livesey wearing a rubber suit as per Little Britain or Eddie Murphy or is it a double.Often we only see a rear shot although i think that there is a shot from the front when he falls in the bath with the army officer?

  15. #55
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    Quote Originally Posted by orpheum
    when blimp is in the turkish bath is Livesey wearing a rubber suit as per Little Britain or Eddie Murphy or is it a double.Often we only see a rear shot although i think that there is a shot from the front when he falls in the bath with the army officer?


    A bit of both, skilfully cut together...a Wynne-Candy bodydouble, when we don't see Roger's face, and Roger wearing a 'carapace', fake chest and belly ensemble, for when we do....

  16. #56
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    A bit of both, skilfully cut together...a Wynne-Candy bodydouble, when we don't see Roger's face, and Roger wearing a 'carapace', fake chest and belly ensemble, for when we do....
    That's another case where digital film might not do them any favours. When you see it in 35mm, even on a big screen, it's very hard to see the join between Roger and his "fat suit" carapace. But on a very big screen, if you're close to the screen and looking carefully, the join is just about visible



    But the way he puffs up his face to suit a gentleman carrying that much weight is amazing.



    Yes, when Clive attacks Spud (James McKechnie) and pushes him into the bath, that is the body double we see from the back, although we then see a close-up of Clive's face and that's Roger again of course.



    BTW if you look carefully, James McKechnie can hardly suppress a smile as he gets beaten up



    Steve

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    4,515
    Liked
    243 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook

    As for the newspaper, I'd never read the rest of it. I only read the bit about "No more khaki for the looms" which is the part relevant to the story. But checking it on a DVD, it doesn't seem to be about the case you mention.



    It's from the Bradford Daily Telegraph of Friday, June 6th 1919 (yes, it was a Friday).

    The main headline of "Liverpool Murder" is followed by a few other sub-headlines which say:

    Suspect Found in River

    Inquest on Artilleryman Home on leave

    An Open Verdict



    So it was a gunner that died, not a sailor. And it was the suspect found in the river, not the victim. A bit further down there's another sub-heading that says "...Eight Days in the Water"



    But that's not to say that the case you mention, and probably others like it, didn't happen. Although big ports like Liverpool, London & Cardiff were fairly well integrated and had been for years, something like the end of the war and the people that had been away fighting coming home and wanting their old jobs back would be sure to cause some problems.



    Steve
    Interestingly the murder of Charles Wooten occurred in the second week of June as well.

    When I'm in Liverpool next will nip into the Library and see what info I can find on that incident.

    Also fascinating was how after WW1 poor demobilisation schemes led to unrest and rioting not only amongst British servicemen but also those from the Commonwealth and Dominions. Could it be that the experience of the British soldier after WW1 was one of the reasons why Churchill was defeated and a Labour Govt. elected at the end of the Second World War.



    regards



    Freddy

  18. #58
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    I doubt the voters memories went back that far. Far more likely would be the way Churchill tried to demonise the Labour Party as rampaging communists, trying to destroy the country, despite most of the Labour cabinet having served well and loyally in key positions in the wartime coalition. Combine that with a desire to move forward and modernise....and Attlee was the moderniser, not Churchill.

  19. #59
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,044
    Liked
    1 times
    What an absolutely riveting thread. I must watch this beauty again.

  20. #60
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    10
    Liked
    0 times
    Here is a very interesting thing - script for Blimp with notes and revisions. Enjoy.



    THE LIFE AND DEATH OF SUGAR CANDY retitled to THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP Script

Page 3 of 10 FirstFirst 12345 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - Restored print
    By Steve Crook in forum Dates for your Diary
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 22-11-11, 09:57 AM
  2. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
    By faginsgirl in forum Can You Name This Film
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-12-08, 12:28 PM
  3. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)
    By Steve Crook in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 10-05-08, 06:29 PM
  4. Life And Death of Colonel Blimp / A Matter Of Life And Death
    By MrDrakesDuck in forum Sales Offers and Bargains
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-12-06, 10:51 AM
  5. Colonel Blimp and A Matter of Life and Death
    By Steve Crook in forum Dates for your Diary
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 23-09-04, 09:13 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts