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  1. #61
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angerr
    Here is a very interesting thing - script for Blimp with notes and revisions. Enjoy.



    THE LIFE AND DEATH OF SUGAR CANDY retitled to THE LIFE AND DEATH OF COLONEL BLIMP Script
    That looks like it's been lifted straight from

    The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (edited by Ian Christie)

    By: Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger

    London: Faber & Faber, June 1994. ISBN 0-571-14355-5



    Who runs that site?

    Who added that script?

    Ian Christie might be interested in their copyright theft



    Steve

  2. #62
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    I haven't thought of that.

    As of who runs the site, I haven't slightest idea - just googled it out.

  3. #63
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angerr
    I haven't thought of that.

    As of who runs the site, I haven't slightest idea - just googled it out.
    The book's quite cheap to buy and has a lot more information in it like all the memos to & from Churchill which show the measures he tried to take to ban the film



    Steve

  4. #64
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    I have just finished the film for the first time. I found it absolutely shattering in its cumulative impact.



    For the first two thirds, I enjoyed it thoroughly as an expertly made intimate epic, but beginning with the scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff applies for residency in Britain, it suddenly moved to a deeper level and I realized that P&P and that superb cast were working on that level from the beginning, and that it was only at that moment that I realized the hold the film had on me.



    The scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff tells Candy that he is an honorable man living by a code that is no longer enough to defeat the enemy is one of the finest scenes I have ever seen in a film. The complex mix of deep sadness and goodness is found only in true art.



    I am glad that I waited until I was well into my 40s before seeing this for the first time. I would not have appreciated it as much if I had seen it when I was a younger man.

  5. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    I have just finished the film for the first time. I found it absolutely shattering in its cumulative impact.



    For the first two thirds, I enjoyed it thoroughly as an expertly made intimate epic, but beginning with the scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff applies for residency in Britain, it suddenly moved to a deeper level and I realized that P&P and that superb cast were working on that level from the beginning, and that it was only at that moment that I realized the hold the film had on me.



    The scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff tells Candy that he is an honorable man living by a code that is no longer enough to defeat the enemy is one of the finest scenes I have ever seen in a film. The complex mix of deep sadness and goodness is found only in true art.



    I am glad that I waited until I was well into my 40s before seeing this for the first time. I would not have appreciated it as much if I had seen it when I was a younger man.
    I know what you mean; I was 18 when I first saw the film, newly restored, on British TV; I loved it then, but I can't say I fully understood it...I'm not entirely sure I fully understand it now 26 years later, but I understand more of it. It's part of the reason it's both my favourite film and my nomination for the greatest film ever made. My first reaction was to want to see it again from the beginning straight away - because I had just seen the same event (The run-up to and the capture in the Turkish baths) and yet felt entirely different about the two sequences; because of how we had got to know the character of Candy in the intervening sequences. Add to that the stunning set-pieces such as the Aliens Board speech, the other sequence soon after, when K-S realises that Candy was always in love with Edith when he sees Johnny Cannon for the first time - still makes me cry after the Lord knows how many viewings.... - this is why it has been my favourite film for a very long time and my nomination for the greatest film ever made.

    People in the past have compared it to Kane, because of the elliptical structure; but this has heart, a compassion for all the characters (except the '01 Prussians perhaps) which kane lacks...I would not change a word of the script, one piece of casting, one camerashot. I think it's perfect. And you will see much more in the details on repeated viewings. Glad you enjoyed it....!!

  6. #66
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    I know what you mean; I was 18 when I first saw the film, newly restored, on British TV; I loved it then, but I can't say I fully understood it...I'm not entirely sure I fully understand it now 26 years later, but I understand more of it. It's part of the reason it's both my favourite film and my nomination for the greatest film ever made. My first reaction was to want to see it again from the beginning straight away - because I had just seen the same event (The run-up to and the capture in the Turkish baths) and yet felt entirely different about the two sequences; because of how we had got to know the character of Candy in the intervening sequences. Add to that the stunning set-pieces such as the Aliens Board speech, the other sequence soon after, when K-S realises that Candy was always in love with Edith when he sees Johnny Cannon for the first time - still makes me cry after the Lord knows how many viewings.... - this is why it has been my favourite film for a very long time and my nomination for the greatest film ever made.

    People in the past have compared it to Kane, because of the elliptical structure; but this has heart, a compassion for all the characters (except the '01 Prussians perhaps) which kane lacks...I would not change a word of the script, one piece of casting, one camerashot. I think it's perfect. And you will see much more in the details on repeated viewings. Glad you enjoyed it....!!
    Ditto, except that I think it even has compassion for those '01 Prussians. It recognises them as being caught in a strange system, but doesn't condemn them for it. Maybe laughs at them slightly like when they're arranging the duel, but it's never cruel about them.





    I always think it's very interesting, given that it was made during a desperate struggle with Germany where the outcome wasn't all that certain, that it's the German who gets the best speeches. Theo's two speeches, the one in the alien's tribunal and the one after Clive's aborted broadcast. They are two great speeches.



    And don't forget the ladies. Deborah not only gives a great triple performance, especially bearing in mind that it was so early in her film career. But the characters she portrays show the changing roles and positions of women through the years covered. Edith Hunter didn't have the vote. Barbara Wynne didn't have the vote when we first met her. By the time she tells Clive not to hum she probably does have it thanks to her position in society due to her father and her husband. Johnny Cannon has the vote, regardless of her "position" in society, and she dares to tell her revered boss that he must change his ways



    Steve

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    I have just finished the film for the first time. I found it absolutely shattering in its cumulative impact.



    For the first two thirds, I enjoyed it thoroughly as an expertly made intimate epic, but beginning with the scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff applies for residency in Britain, it suddenly moved to a deeper level and I realized that P&P and that superb cast were working on that level from the beginning, and that it was only at that moment that I realized the hold the film had on me.



    The scene where Kretschmar-Schuldorff tells Candy that he is an honorable man living by a code that is no longer enough to defeat the enemy is one of the finest scenes I have ever seen in a film. The complex mix of deep sadness and goodness is found only in true art.



    I am glad that I waited until I was well into my 40s before seeing this for the first time. I would not have appreciated it as much if I had seen it when I was a younger man.


    Hi Tim, anyone reading your post who has not seen this film, will do so now. So congratulations as you will inspire people to discover the world of Powell & Pressburger., great post

  8. #68
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    I know what you mean; I was 18 when I first saw the film, newly restored, on British TV; I loved it then, but I can't say I fully understood it...I'm not entirely sure I fully understand it now 26 years later, but I understand more of it. It's part of the reason it's both my favourite film and my nomination for the greatest film ever made. My first reaction was to want to see it again from the beginning straight away - because I had just seen the same event (The run-up to and the capture in the Turkish baths) and yet felt entirely different about the two sequences; because of how we had got to know the character of Candy in the intervening sequences. Add to that the stunning set-pieces such as the Aliens Board speech, the other sequence soon after, when K-S realises that Candy was always in love with Edith when he sees Johnny Cannon for the first time - still makes me cry after the Lord knows how many viewings.... - this is why it has been my favourite film for a very long time and my nomination for the greatest film ever made.

    People in the past have compared it to Kane, because of the elliptical structure; but this has heart, a compassion for all the characters (except the '01 Prussians perhaps) which kane lacks...I would not change a word of the script, one piece of casting, one camerashot. I think it's perfect. And you will see much more in the details on repeated viewings. Glad you enjoyed it....!!
    The single most moving scene in the film for me is at the very end: the simple exchange between Candy and Johnny and Kretschmar-Schuldorff regarding the young officer who had humiliated him. Candy will not have him punished harshly and will probably invite him for dinner - just as he and Kretschmar-Schuldorff had reconciled forty years before after the duel. The difference, though, is that this time the officer is not a gentleman, and took advantage of Candy in a way that Kretschmar-Schuldorff never would. He asks Candy: you may treat him honorably but will he become the grand old man you have turned out to be? The implicit answer is no.



    But it is not a sentimental scene: The point is that Candy cannot change. He belongs to a world that is dead, but he cannot leave the code of honor and courtesy and decency that he has known all his life.



    The other scene that stood out to me upon a second viewing is the meeting in the POW camp, where Kretschmar-Schuldorff turns away from Candy in front of his fellow officers. It simply never occurs to Candy that four years of mutual killing between their nations would have an effect on a friendship. The Hebrides Overture begins as Kretschmar-Schuldorff walks away, leaving Candy genuinely bewildered. Marvelous.



    I have been fascinated all my life with the question: What happened to the west? How did the pre-1914 world disappear so completely? This seems to me the most significant historical question in recent history. More than any other film, this provides an answer - and it is an extraordinary achievement.

  9. #69
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevie boy
    Hi Tim, anyone reading your post who has not seen this film, will do so now. So congratulations as you will inspire people to discover the world of Powell & Pressburger., great post
    Thanks Stevie. Discovering the films of Powell and Pressburger in the last six months has been a real voyage of discovery, comparable to my discovery of the great silent classics in my twenties. I found two masterpieces that I did not know existed: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp and A Canterbury Tale , and there are still many I have not seen. If anyone is encouraged to view their films based on a comment I have been made, I would be honored.



    Next on the list: A Matter of Life and Death.

  10. #70
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    The single most moving scene in the film for me is at the very end: the simple exchange between Candy and Johnny and Kretschmar-Schuldorff regarding the young officer who had humiliated him. Candy will not have him punished harshly and will probably invite him for dinner - just as he and Kretschmar-Schuldorff had reconciled forty years before after the duel. The difference, though, is that this time the officer is not a gentleman, and took advantage of Candy in a way that Kretschmar-Schuldorff never would. He asks Candy: you may treat him honorably but will he become the grand old man you have turned out to be? The implicit answer is no.



    But it is not a sentimental scene: The point is that Candy cannot change. He belongs to a world that is dead, but he cannot leave the code of honor and courtesy and decency that he has known all his life.



    The other scene that stood out to me upon a second viewing is the meeting in the POW camp, where Kretschmar-Schuldorff turns away from Candy in front of his fellow officers. It simply never occurs to Candy that four years of mutual killing between their nations would have an effect on a friendship. The Hebrides Overture begins as Kretschmar-Schuldorff walks away, leaving Candy genuinely bewildered. Marvelous.



    I have been fascinated all my life with the question: What happened to the west? How did the pre-1914 world disappear so completely? This seems to me the most significant historical question in recent history. More than any other film, this provides an answer - and it is an extraordinary achievement.
    Candy does change, slightly. He recognises that the world about him is changing and that must lead to the "Death of Colonel Blimp" in the title. But he can still be a man of honour whenever that is possible.



    But Clive, dear old Clive, is an innocent adrift in the world through most of it. It's Theo who gets all the best speeches and he is the one who has the most insight into the changing world. Not bad for a German character in a film made when Britain was in the middle of a life and death struggle with Germany



    You can see why it upset some people in positions of authority



    Steve

  11. #71
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    Thanks Stevie. Discovering the films of Powell and Pressburger in the last six months has been a real voyage of discovery, comparable to my discovery of the great silent classics in my twenties. I found two masterpieces that I did not know existed: The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp and A Canterbury Tale , and there are still many I have not seen. If anyone is encouraged to view their films based on a comment I have been made, I would be honored.



    Next on the list: A Matter of Life and Death.
    I'm (almost) jealous. There's nothing quite like the first viewing. But that film does stand repeated viewings more than any other film I know.



    I'd be most interested to hear what you think of it



    Steve

  12. #72
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    Having just watched it myself last week for the first time it seems to convey also the difference between the honourable Prussian of pre 1914 and the evil of Nazism.

    The solitude of Kretschmar-Schuldorff as a German exile appealed to me greatly.

    The loss of his wife and the sad loss of his two sons to the Hitler youth is particularly moving especially when said to the desk clerk who is totally unmoved by his plight.

    Candy's almost over-bearing sincerity is quite sad. He lived by a code and would never change. When he told K-S that he'd never really got over being in love with his wife was perhaps the most moving part of the film.

    It is a film I need to see again, but I was very impressed . I purchased it as part of a three box set including "I know where I'm going" and "A matter of life and death".





    I also learned the following

    1)Blackadder the 4th. signiture tune British Grenadiers-was that a suggestion by Stephen Fry?

    2)A possible role model for the mannerisms of General Melchitt. Behhhhhhhh..that's the ticket Blackadder!!

    3)Penfold's signature!



    The only P&P film I saw befor that was The 49th. Parallel,and it's sympathetic take on the U-boat crew, presumably conveyed a similar message that honourable Germans even existed during WWII. A very forward looking view for a 1941 film.

  13. #73
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scholes
    Having just watched it myself last week for the first time it seems to convey also the difference between the honourable Prussian of pre 1914 and the evil of Nazism.

    The solitude of Kretschmar-Schuldorff as a German exile appealed to me greatly.

    The loss of his wife and the sad loss of his two sons to the Hitler youth is particularly moving especially when said to the desk clerk who is totally unmoved by his plight.

    Candy's almost over-bearing sincerity is quite sad. He lived by a code and would never change. When he told K-S that he'd never really got over being in love with his wife was perhaps the most moving part of the film.

    It is a film I need to see again, but I was very impressed . I purchased it as part of a three box set including "I know where I'm going" and "A matter of life and death".
    Interesting to hear your comments, thanks.

    I'd like to know what you think about the other two as well



    I also learned the following

    1)Blackadder the 4th. signiture tune British Grenadiers-was that a suggestion by Stephen Fry?

    2)A possible role model for the mannerisms of General Melchitt. Behhhhhhhh..that's the ticket Blackadder!!

    3)Penfold's signature!
    Penfold's signature - yes, that's where it comes from.

    As to the other two, Stephen Fry has come out as a definite fan of the film (did that DVD include A Profile of 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp' where Stephen talks about it?

    But I think that the British Grenadiers and WWI British generals being idiots might be too much of a well known generalisation to attribute it to Stephen's liking of the film.



    The only P&P film I saw befor that was The 49th. Parallel,and it's sympathetic take on the U-boat crew, presumably conveyed a similar message that honourable Germans even existed during WWII. A very forward looking view for a 1941 film.
    Forward looking and quite risky, that view didn't make them many friends. And bear in mind that 49th Parallel was the only P&P film where they got any form of direct government sponsorship or support.



    For Blimp, after Churchill was told about it (but not shown a script) and railed against it, the order went out that P&P shouldn't get any help from the Army. But they still managed to get those trucks, uniforms and despatch riders



    Steve

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    Interesting to hear your comments, thanks.

    I'd like to know what you think about the other two as well



    Penfold's signature - yes, that's where it comes from.

    As to the other two, Stephen Fry has come out as a definite fan of the film (did that DVD include A Profile of 'The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp' where Stephen talks about it?

    But I think that the British Grenadiers and WWI British generals being idiots might be too much of a well known generalisation to attribute it to Stephen's liking of the film.



    Forward looking and quite risky, that view didn't make them many friends. And bear in mind that 49th Parallel was the only P&P film where they got any form of direct government sponsorship or support.



    For Blimp, after Churchill was told about it (but not shown a script) and railed against it, the order went out that P&P shouldn't get any help from the Army. But they still managed to get those trucks, uniforms and despatch riders



    Steve
    Thanks Steve for a very informative response.

    Didn't have a special features disc, oh mind you I'm not quite sure, but I'll check.

    I'm also a big David Low fan from whose mind the character originated.

    I have seen both the other two films but thought discusssion of same would be more appropriate to the relevant thread.

    Needless to say they are very touching films.

    Livesey gives top performances in each.

  15. #75
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scholes
    Thanks Steve for a very informative response.

    Didn't have a special features disc, oh mind you I'm not quite sure, but I'll check.

    I'm also a big David Low fan from whose mind the character originated.

    I have seen both the other two films but thought discusssion of same would be more appropriate to the relevant thread.

    Needless to say they are very touching films.

    Livesey gives top performances in each.
    The A Profile of ... documentaries are on the Carlton (Granada / ITV DVD) releases of Blimp, Black Narcissus and The Red Shoes. They are all very interesting documentaries. They're on the "�1 per DVD" HMV boxed set.



    That's one of the big puzzles about Roger Livesey. He did quite a few other films but the only time he gave great performances on film was in the 3 he did for Powell & Pressburger, Blimp, AMOLAD & IKWIG. Was it because they were the only times he was given the lead in a film? He had 2nd male lead in a few others, like Midshipman Easy and The Drum but it's those 3 P&P films that seem to have brought out his best performances



    Steve

  16. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook

    That's one of the big puzzles about Roger Livesey. He did quite a few other films but the only time he gave great performances on film was in the 3 he did for Powell & Pressburger, Blimp, AMOLAD & IKWIG. Was it because they were the only times he was given the lead in a film? He had 2nd male lead in a few others, like Midshipman Easy and The Drum but it's those 3 P&P films that seem to have brought out his best performances



    Steve
    It's a guess but it may of been because he realised he was part of something special and involved with extraordinary film makers. All three are marvellous films perhaps Livesey knew they were special before he saw the finished article and maybe in other films he was part of, he did not have the motivation because he knew he was involved in something a of mediocre standard when compared to working with 'The Archers'. I think with any type of work if you have an employer who you are glad to work for, invariably this will get a better response from the employee.



    With Blimp and AMOLAD I think it would of been quite easy to recognise that you where part of something special but with IKWIG it might not of been so easy at the time of making, more trust would have to be invested in the film makers, maybe.



    Perhaps P&P had very positive and influential ways over their actors and were able to extract great performances based on what influence they were exacting on the stars of their films. I'd also say the same thing about Niven, 'The Archers' where among only the a few film makers to get the full potential out him in AMOLAD.



    Simon

  17. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook

    That's one of the big puzzles about Roger Livesey. He did quite a few other films but the only time he gave great performances on film was in the 3 he did for Powell & Pressburger, Blimp, AMOLAD & IKWIG. Was it because they were the only times he was given the lead in a film? He had 2nd male lead in a few others, like Midshipman Easy and The Drum but it's those 3 P&P films that seem to have brought out his best performances



    Steve
    Well, in a sense it is only in IKWIG that he was the male lead...in AMOLAD Niven was the male lead, and in the Blimp credits Roger is third behind both Anton and Deborah, despite rarely being off-screen.

    He is fine in The Drum, and has a showy cameo in Rembrandt....and in The League....but, like Sabu, David Farrar, Esmond Knight and quite a few other actors and actresses, his best work was indeed with The Archers.

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    I am a very new member here, and the first thread I read was this one.



    I have enjoyed our Criterion BLIMP for several years (do DVDs wear out? I hope not) and I have read books, articles and Internet commentaries on P&P and BLIMP.



    Never have I read a more well-informed and passionate appreciation of the movie than right here. You guys made me laugh, cry and shout with joy as I followed the discussion. Bravo.



    A little PS: Many folks refer to Walbrook's two inspiring speeches about the failure of German society and the horror of Nazi-ism, and the need to fight for survival.



    It is worth remembering his earlier boast on the 1919 POW repatriation train, after dinner with Candy and friends. "They are children ... they think enemies can be friends ... one man actually said we must be trading partners! ... they are weak. This is the raft that will float us back to power."



    It is a chilling scene that makes Walbrook even more believable as an older man betrayed by his country twenty years later.



    I also admire the tear-jerker conclusion, "Until the waters rise and this is a lake..." as Candy views the emergency reservoir where his bombed house once stood.



    *snif* There is not a wasted minute or misplaced word in this perfect film.

  19. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Keechelus
    I am a very new member here, and the first thread I read was this one.



    There is not a wasted minute or misplaced word in this perfect film.
    Welcome to our merry band.....and that last sentence puts the film in a nutshell. Barely a line is spoken that doesn't have resonance elsewhere in the film, comes back to haunt, or point up a situation. Perfect, yes, I wouldn't change a thing.

  20. #80
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    Thanks for your kind welcome. I'll seek other P&P discussions here.



    This is a wonderful forum.

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