Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast
Results 101 to 120 of 197
  1. #101
    Senior Member Country: Canada
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    161
    Liked
    0 times
    Yep -- found, lost, found-and-lost love.



    BLIMP's undercurrent of human romance is nicely played across 40 years. Clive lost his first great love, Edith, to Theo - willingly, as the story tells us.



    Clive's Barbara was his life's heart, a complete partner until her untimely death. When Theo and Clive meet again in 1939, Edith and Barbara are both gone. Perhaps worse for Theo, his son with Edith is also lost to the Nazi machine, leaving him without a country and a family. His memories of Edith are marred by their son's rejection of Theo's code of honour and Edith's decency.



    PnP were maybe too clever in casting Kerr as Edith and Barbara, and pushing it farther in bringing her in again as the WAC driver Johnnie - but it works for me.



    BLIMP is not a romance nor a war movie. It is a character study set in difficult times. A helluva success.

  2. #102
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by moonfleet
    O.K, there is the friendship between the so told "ennemies", but the main thing in this film, for me, are the love stories.....



    Clive Candy and Edith Hunter are in love, no doubt, we know their growing relationship, but not the one between she and Kretschmar-Schuldorff(and I have no grandchildrens!).Not to declare he(Candy) loves her in time (adding that she sent him lots of signals !), so he lost her and she goes with the other one....

    Candy didn't realize at the time, but after, it's too late. And he spends his lifetime hunting (all animals of the creation !) and mainly looking for her.

    Deborah Kerr and Roger Livesey are so well matched....it's a crime !



    But this is the way storie goes...



    Moon.
    Clive was in love with Edith, but was she in love with him?

    Edith might have grown to love Clive in Berlin - but he spent too much time with Frau von Kalteneck (played by Roger Livesey's own wife, Ursula Jeans).



    I think Clive's love for Edith only developed fully (into an obsession?) after they parted and Edith was already in love with Theo by then



    We never get to know Barbara very well, but she obviously adores Clive



    'Johnny' has a lot of love/respect/affection for Clive





    And what about the other love story? The love between Clive and Theo? A love between two people doesn't have to have anything of a sexual nature. Two friends can love each other as deeply as any sexual partnership



    Steve

  3. #103
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    Clive was in love with Edith, but was she in love with him?

    Steve
    I've changed my mind on this over the years - now, I think she was; replay that scene wher he congratulates her and gets an embrace; Edith's expression (Which Clive never sees - her head is beside his) gives her away.

    She will be loyal to Theo - but I think she was in love with Clive first.

  4. #104
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    It's just my favourite of all time - and it bears the repeated scrutiny I've given it over the years. Such complexity, worn lightly. If there is one film that can stand comparison with the classics of high art, it's this one.

  5. #105
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by penfold
    I've changed my mind on this over the years - now, I think she was; replay that scene wher he congratulates her and gets an embrace; Edith's expression (Which Clive never sees - her head is beside his) gives her away.

    She will be loyal to Theo - but I think she was in love with Clive first.
    I know the scene you mean. But back then (1916) the women waited to be courted and Clive was busy with that Kalteneck woman. There's certainly regret in Edith's expression.



    Steve

  6. #106
    Super Moderator Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    4,804
    Liked
    7 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    I know the scene you mean. But back then (1916) the women waited to be courted and Clive was busy with that Kalteneck woman. There's certainly regret in Edith's expression.



    Steve
    1901/2 .....and while you are right about the mores of the time, in many ways Edith was ahead of her time. Perhaps she didn't realise herself until that point.....

  7. #107
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    Just a foot note but as Steve is a P and P connoisseur and Welsh, he may be delighted to learn that Roger Livesey was also Welsh. Which probably explains that unique well-matured timbre to this voice

  8. #108
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by thatllbetheday
    Just a foot note but as Steve is a P and P connoisseur and Welsh, he may be delighted to learn that Roger Livesey was also Welsh. Which probably explains that unique well-matured timbre to this voice
    Well, Welsh-ish

    He was born in Barry, South Wales. But his parents were touring theatrical types. The whole extended family used to tour around the country in a van with a side that dropped down to make a stage, giving performances in country towns.



    Roger's dad was English, from Derbyshire. His Mum was Welsh, from Llantrisant, Glam. She went to stay with her Mum when she had Roger, and again when she had his sister Maggie, but neither of them were really brought up much in Wales. They joined the family back on the road as soon as they were able to.



    Roger always considered himself to be British, not especially Welsh, nor English.



    The Livesey family structure is quite a complicated one. Brothers Joseph and Sam Livesey married sisters. Sam married Margaret Ann Edwards in 1900 and Joseph married Mary Catherine Edwards in 1905. Sam and Margaret Ann had two sons, Jack Livesey and Barrie Livesey. Joseph and Mary Catherine had two children, Roger and Maggie. Joseph died in 1911 and Margaret Ann died in 1913, so Sam married Mary Catherine later in 1913 and they brought up the children as one large family, producing another child of their own, Stella in 1915.



    The complexity propagated into the next generation when Roger Livesey married Ursula Jeans, as her brother Desmond was already married to Roger's sister Maggie.



    Steve

  9. #109
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    Well, I suppose since they were always on the move, they probably didn't get much of a chance to meet many people outside of the van. By the way, I think he was a bit of a dish in his younger days qv. Life and Death of Colonel Blimp.

  10. #110
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    1,213
    Liked
    2 times
    Had a quick look back at the beginning of this thread. Why do people say "they were before their time"? They were of their time, just original geniuses. If you find the same kinds of thing 25 years later (colour technique, anti-imperialistic attitudes, camera moves) then the directors of the sixties were probably influenced by Powell and Pressburger and therefore copying. Martin Scorcese has no problem acknowledging a debt to P and P.

  11. #111
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    330
    Liked
    0 times
    Just watched it, and once again found myself hiding my tears at the end. What a wonderful film.

  12. #112
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    2,381
    Liked
    13 times
    I have just watched the Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Sat 6th Dec) and trawled through this thread. Much of what I would have said is already here but no one spotted (I think) the prophetic moment when, in the house just after Blimp has got his retirement papers, his friends motivate him to join the new Home Guard (LDV actually). The loyal retainer Murdoch (John Laurie) announces that he has just joined the Home Guard without realising how much that would mean to him in a new career as Frazer 30 years on.

  13. #113
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Bernardo
    I have just watched the Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (Sat 6th Dec) and trawled through this thread. Much of what I would have said is already here but no one spotted (I think) the prophetic moment when, in the house just after Blimp has got his retirement papers, his friends motivate him to join the new Home Guard (LDV actually). The loyal retainer Murdoch (John Laurie) announces that he has just joined the Home Guard without realising how much that would mean to him in a new career as Frazer 30 years on.
    Nobody mentioned it here, but it's certainly been spotted and commented on in the past



    And John Laurie was the only member of the Dad's Army cast who was ever (AFAIK) actually in the Home Guard



    Steve

  14. #114
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    138
    Liked
    0 times
    I'm inclined to believe Edith loved them both, but chose Theo as he asked first, but remained conflicted.



    I think Clive was probably oblivious as to how Edith felt until she kissed him. At this point he also realised his own affection for her and being the Perfect Gentleman, he let it go and made it easy for Edith to be with that other fine fellow.



    Thus began Clive's search...



    This is my favourite film too.

  15. #115
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    6,953
    Liked
    399 times
    Quote Originally Posted by moonfleet View Post
    ....Deborah Kerr and Roger Livesey are so well matched....it's a crime ! ......Moon.
    Deborah and Roger were wonderful together on screen. When I ran across this photo, I realised again how much I liked the relationship between James McKechnie as the irreverent Spud and Deborah as Johnny, Clive's driver, full of energy, sparkle, and an air of derring-do about her. I love this scene of Johnny under the desk and the knowing look in Spud's eye.


  16. #116
    Senior Member Country: United States MonicaMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    362
    Liked
    3 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Neil1889 View Post
    I'm inclined to believe Edith loved them both, but chose Theo as he asked first, but remained conflicted.

    I think Clive was probably oblivious as to how Edith felt until she kissed him. At this point he also realised his own affection for her and being the Perfect Gentleman, he let it go and made it easy for Edith to be with that other fine fellow.

    Thus began Clive's search...

    This is my favourite film too.
    This makes the most sense to me. I went back to watch that scene, and am noticing more layers than earlier. I wish I liked the film more, but I think I'm just a sucker for straight romances, rather than the lifelong search for the one that got away. (The latter being too close to home?) Also, DK is just so beautiful in body and voice, even though I'm a hetero girl, I'm just like, "Wow, you are so gorgeous."

    Off topic, but since someone brought up the movie: why does Clive add Barbara's surname to his own when they marry? (Clive Wynne-Candy) Is/was that done? What would have happened if they had children with the hyphenated name and they married people with further hyphenated names?

  17. #117
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MonicaMC View Post
    Off topic, but since someone brought up the movie: why does Clive add Barbara's surname to his own when they marry? (Clive Wynne-Candy) Is/was that done? What would have happened if they had children with the hyphenated name and they married people with further hyphenated names?
    Then you get people like Lady Anne Eliza Mary Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville.

    The family crest of the Temple-Nugent-Brydges-Chandos-Grenville family was a bit complicated


    Steve

  18. #118
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    330
    Liked
    0 times
    I've just watched LADOCB and once again I find myself utterly choked. There are several points in this wondeful film that make you realise just what expert film-makers the Archers were. They knew when to add music, when not to, when to let a silence tell the story and when just to shut up. That final scene ('and this is a lake...'), where the passing parade makes General Wynne-Candy swell with pride always does the trick.
    Roger Livesey was made for this role, and Anton Walbrook turns in a spot-on performance as his dear friend. Teriffic.

  19. #119
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,749
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy H View Post
    I've just watched LADOCB and once again I find myself utterly choked. There are several points in this wondeful film that make you realise just what expert film-makers the Archers were. They knew when to add music, when not to, when to let a silence tell the story and when just to shut up. That final scene ('and this is a lake...'), where the passing parade makes General Wynne-Candy swell with pride always does the trick.
    Roger Livesey was made for this role, and Anton Walbrook turns in a spot-on performance as his dear friend. Teriffic.
    Most people would be happy with just one masterpiece like Blimp. But not The Archers. They went on and made another masterpiece every year from 1943 - 1948. And all, except Black Narcissus, were from an original story by Emeric Pressburger.

    I love their films as individual films, but it's their total body of work that never ceases to amaze me. The consistent high quality and the variations in subject and style

    Steve

  20. #120
    Member Country: Eritrea Manterik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    25
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Andy H View Post
    I've just watched LADOCB and once again I find myself utterly choked. There are several points in this wondeful film that make you realise just what expert film-makers the Archers were. They knew when to add music, when not to, when to let a silence tell the story and when just to shut up. That final scene ('and this is a lake...'), where the passing parade makes General Wynne-Candy swell with pride always does the trick.
    Roger Livesey was made for this role, and Anton Walbrook turns in a spot-on performance as his dear friend. Teriffic.
    I had never seen this movie before this afternoon.

    What a stunning piece of cinema.

    Absolutely heavenly way to spend the afternoon.

Page 6 of 10 FirstFirst ... 45678 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp - Restored print
    By Steve Crook in forum Dates for your Diary
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 22-11-11, 09:57 AM
  2. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
    By faginsgirl in forum Can You Name This Film
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-12-08, 12:28 PM
  3. The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943)
    By Steve Crook in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 41
    Last Post: 10-05-08, 06:29 PM
  4. Life And Death of Colonel Blimp / A Matter Of Life And Death
    By MrDrakesDuck in forum Sales Offers and Bargains
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 04-12-06, 10:51 AM
  5. Colonel Blimp and A Matter of Life and Death
    By Steve Crook in forum Dates for your Diary
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 23-09-04, 09:13 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts