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  1. #161
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
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    Thanks for that anyhow Steve.

    This is the marriage Banns of a Margaret Murphy who lived in Vine Street, though if she was married her name usually would have been Morris. It could be that her mother had the same Christian name (quite common) and it is the mother who is the victim.

    Liverpool City library has on microfilm all 1919 inquests so further investigation in the future. Census check now, did try earlier but sod's law says it's a long street.

    Last edited by Freddy; 04-02-12 at 12:58 PM.

  2. #162
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    I've been reading up about this amazing film and how, during production, it was compared with Gone With The Wind.

    Both have sumptuous 'Technicolor' (I think Blimp was the 3rd or 4th British colour film). Both are rather epic; Gone With The Wind covers twelve years while Blimp covers forty.

    I think Blimp was the longest British film at the time. I thought there was a thread here in Britmovie about long films but I can't find it. So I have gone to IMDB and cobbled up this tally of lengthy movies�



    242 mins Hamlet (1996, Branagh, uncut)

    238 mins Gone With The Wind

    225 mins The Greatest Story Ever Told

    220 mins The Ten Commandments

    216 mins Lawrence of Arabia

    212 mins Ben-Hur

    208 mins Exodus, War and Peace (1954)

    206 mins Ryan's Daughter

    197 mins Spartacus, Doctor Zhivago

    194 mins Titanic (1997)

    192 mins Cleopatra

    191 mins Gandhi

    168 mins Far from the Madding Crowd

    165 mins Othello, The Three Sisters (1970)

    164 mins A Passage to India

    163 mins The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp

    161 mins Richard III (1955), Bridge on the River Kwai

  3. #163
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    I think Blimp was the longest British film at the time.
    Which makes it all the more amazing that they fully restored it. As a three strip Technicolor film, every frame seen on screen has 3 frames in the film plus the optical soundtrack so that was a LOT of work to fully restore it all. They had to scan each frame at a very high resolution, clean them all up then put them all back together to get the original colour balance

    Steve

  4. #164
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    I think Blimp was the longest British film at the time...
    So I have gone to IMDB and cobbled up this tally of lengthy movies
    If you want to compare them by date & country you should include the date & country

    242 mins Hamlet (1996, Branagh, uncut, UK / USA)

    238 mins Gone With The Wind (1939, USA)

    225 mins The Greatest Story Ever Told (1965 USA)

    220 mins The Ten Commandments (1956 USA)

    216 mins Lawrence of Arabia (1962 UK)

    212 mins Ben-Hur (1959 USA)

    208 mins Exodus (1960 USA), War and Peace (1956 USA / Italy)

    206 mins Ryan's Daughter (1970 UK)

    197 mins Spartacus (1960 USA), Doctor Zhivago (1965 USA / Italy / UK)

    194 mins Titanic (1997 USA)

    192 mins Cleopatra (1963 UK / USA / Switzerland)

    191 mins Gandhi (1982 UK / India)

    168 mins Far from the Madding Crowd (1967 UK)

    165 mins Othello (1965 UK), The Three Sisters (1966 USA)

    164 mins A Passage to India (1984 UK / USA)

    163 mins The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp (1943 UK)

    161 mins Richard III (1955 UK), Bridge on the River Kwai (1957 UK / USA)


    Steve

  5. #165
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Which makes it all the more amazing that they fully restored it. As a three strip Technicolor film, every frame seen on screen has 3 frames in the film plus the optical soundtrack so that was a LOT of work to fully restore it all. They had to scan each frame at a very high resolution, clean them all up then put them all back together to get the original colour balance

    Steve
    They experimented with various colour processes during the 'Adventures of Sir Lancelot' series in the 50s and I believe they did do one episode in three strip Technicolor (only a b/w dupe is thought to survive now)? However they discovered that TV(in those days) just could not cope with Technicolor in any form (3 or single strip) as the contrast ratio so wide ranging. So If a film was to be shown on tv it would have to be from a standard Eastman print ..and this is what we have been use to seeing on telly for many years. Something like that anyway.

  6. #166
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bert Quark View Post
    They experimented with various colour processes during the 'Adventures of Sir Lancelot' series in the 50s and I believe they did do one episode in three strip Technicolor (only a b/w dupe is thought to survive now)? However they discovered that TV(in those days) just could not cope with Technicolor in any form (3 or single strip) as the contrast ratio so wide ranging. So If a film was to be shown on tv it would have to be from a standard Eastman print ..and this is what we have been use to seeing on telly for many years. Something like that anyway.
    3 strip Technicolor only lasted until about 1955. By 1950 Eastmancolor was already making some leeway into the industry.
    The end results might not have bbeen so impressive but Eastmancolor was a lot easier to work with. 3 strip Technicolor required massive cameras and it also required very high levels of light to ensure that enough light reached each strip of film after it had been split by the prism

    Steve

  7. #167
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    I went to see War and Peace when it was originally released on the ABC circuit in 1957 and, although it ran 208 minutes (3 and a half hours), it seemed to last a lot longer. It just went on and on and on and in fact, until recently, I always thought it ran at least four hours.

  8. #168
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    I went to see War and Peace when it was originally released on the ABC circuit in 1957 and, although it ran 208 minutes (3 and a half hours), it seemed to last a lot longer. It just went on and on and on and in fact, until recently, I always thought it ran at least four hours.
    Some films do that, they appear to drag on and on
    Other films never seem to be long enough

    Steve

  9. #169
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    It all depends if they can hold your interest and you can become involved in them, Steve. I've known some films that run an hour and a half that are so good, they seem to be over too soon and others that run an hour and a half that really drag.

  10. #170
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    3 strip Technicolor only lasted until about 1955. By 1950 Eastmancolor was already making some leeway into the industry.
    The end results might not have bbeen so impressive but Eastmancolor was a lot easier to work with. 3 strip Technicolor required massive cameras and it also required very high levels of light to ensure that enough light reached each strip of film after it had been split by the prism

    Steve
    And the colour on all those Technicolor dye transfer prints is as vivid as the day it left the laboratory, while all the Eastmancolor has gradually faded to pink.

  11. #171
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Yes, I have some 35mm Technicolor clippings from the 1950s that haven't faded at all, but all my old Eastman Colour stuff has faded away to a pinky red. They can be restored to their original hues, but it's expensive. However, Network have done a fine job on all those old Eastman Colour Look at Life shorts.

  12. #172
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by narabdela View Post
    And the colour on all those Technicolor dye transfer prints is as vivid as the day it left the laboratory, while all the Eastmancolor has gradually faded to pink.
    Not all of them. Some have faded, usually the more popular films which have been copied often.
    When they went to make a new print of Blimp for Scorsese they found that it had faded in parts, had scratches on it and even had some mould growing on some parts of it! Different strips had also shrunk or stretched slightly in parts thus putting the colour registration out when the print was made. It was in a terrible state.

    That's why Scorsese set up the Film Foundation. They raised many millions of dollars to let them start restoring those old three strip Technicolor films.

    They first tried to do it photochemically, but that didn't work very well. So they digitised every frame of the negatives and cleaned them all digitally. That was a huge amount of mainly manual effort. Then they had to put it all back together. They worked hard to ensure that they got as close as possible to the original look and feel of a Technicolor film from the 1940s which was different for British Technicolor and American Technicolor.

    They first did The Red Shoes because that was in the worst condition. That took them many years and quite a few millions of dollars. But the results were stunning. They used what they learned in that exercise to restore The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp which they could do a bit cheaper and faster. They then restored The Tales of Hoffmann.

    These are full restorations, not just another print made from the same tired old negatives which a lot of distributors and promoters incorrectly call a restoration

    Steve

  13. #173
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    If you want to compare them by date & country you should include the date & country...
    Yes, you're right. I guess that selected list shows my preferences. It does show it would be another decade until a British film maker would make a film as long as the audacious Powell and Pressburger.

  14. #174
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    Yes, you're right. I guess that selected list shows my preferences. It does show it would be another decade until a British film maker would make a film as long as the audacious Powell and Pressburger.
    As you've possibly been told - length isn't important
    What you do with it is more important

    It would be many more decades before anyone matched the quality of P&P and I don't think that anyone's come close to their total body of work. The films they made from 1943 - 1951 were just amazing. One film per year, in many different styles & genres, all of incredible quality in depth.

    Steve

  15. #175
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Yes, I have some 35mm Technicolor clippings from the 1950s that haven't faded at all, but all my old Eastman Colour stuff has faded away to a pinky red. They can be restored to their original hues, but it's expensive. However, Network have done a fine job on all those old Eastman Colour Look at Life shorts.
    Have Network done anything with them (after all they are good value)? The prints sent out to cinemas would have been regarded as ephemeral and not given the laboratory time to 'fix' them more permanently as say the master print that Network might have used?
    Last edited by Bert Quark; 01-11-15 at 07:01 AM.

  16. #176
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    I can't say for sure, Bert. I suppose the original Eastman Colour negatives were used for the DVD releases, although some of the films have deteriorated...I recall one about the Chelsea Flower Show that would have looked a lot better when it was new. I still have a few 35mm frame clippings from Look at Life films of the early 1960s and by and large, the colour doesn't look too bad on them, although the colour in a frame of Helen Shapiro in For The Record (1961) has faded badly. I think it all depends on how the films were processed at the time. The processing for Eastman Colour may have been inferior to that used for Technicolor.

  17. #177
    Senior Member Country: Scotland narabdela's Avatar
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    It's a long read, but this article on dye transfer prints is interesting and informative.

    http://www.in70mm.com/news/2010/technicolor/

  18. #178
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    It seems there is a company called 'Colonel Blimp Films'�

    http://www.theguardian.com/stage/vid...n-calero-video

  19. #179
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    It seems there is a company called 'Colonel Blimp Films'—
    But are they named after the film or after the cartoon?

    Steve

  20. #180
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    Devotees of the Powell and Pressburger movement (of which I am one) might like to be aware of this radio documentary shortly

    BBC Radio 3, Saturday 2 April
    Music scores related to Powell and Pressburger collaboration
    3-4 pm

    Can't see on the BBC website more info than in Radio Times just yet.

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