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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Torquemada
    Absolutely fantastic score and the end scene with 'arold realising it's all over with the music hammering the point home, just magnificent.
    . . . and the close-up eye contact in the rear view mirror . . .

  2. #42
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    Francis Monkman - of 70s groups Sky and Curved Air - wrote the score. Considering that he had had no formal composition training I'd agree that he did a damned good job....those saxes in the car scene WOW.



    Pierce Brosnan never met Hoskins...all he saw was a black spot on the rear window and acted towards that. When Hoskins filmed his bit, the director John Mackenzie was driving and the sound man was in the boot, apparantly, with the JM encouraging Hoskins along.



    Lew Grade's ITC dropped the film like a hot potato after it was made because of the IRA subject matter and George Harrison's Handmade Films picked it up. I believe that it was Harrison who chose Monkman as the composer.



    Next time you watch it, keep an ear open for the boat scene near the end when Harold kills Jeff. Originally, Derek Thompson said that for ten years British soldiers had had shit running down their legs....but this was re-dubbed to say that they'd had shit flying at them for ten years. Once you know this, it stands out a mile 'cos the dubbing isn't perfect.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Must-have movies: The Long Good Friday



    Last Updated: 12:01am BST 18/05/2007



    Marc Lee reviews a classic that every film-lover will want to own



    Plans to remake one of the greatest British gangster movies were announced this week. The producers say it will be a "refreshed" version of the story in a modern setting, and shooting is due to begin in Miami next year. All of which rings deafening alarm bells.



    The Long Good Friday is so firmly embedded in the era in which it was made that it is impossible to imagine it any other way. The burgeoning of Thatcherite Britain, the dawn of the greed-is-good '80s and the transformation of London's docklands are not merely a backdrop; they define everything about the story of underworld boss Harold Shand's ambitious plans for a multi-million-pound property deal.



    Harold has invited his American backers - actually the Mafia - to see for themselves the vast potential of redeveloping the deserted wastes of east London. However, just as he launches his charm offensive, Harold's empire comes under attack from a mysterious, unseen enemy.



    An associate is knifed at a swimming pool, a bomb destroys his Rolls-Royce, and, in the film's most spectacular scene, his East End pub is blown up seconds before he arrives with his new best friends.



    Harold despatches his knuckle-headed and heavily tooled-up gang to discover what's going on - with a hilarious plea for them to "be discreet". When the usual suspects are rounded up, Harold has them hung upside-down from a line of meathooks to ease the interrogation.



    A never-better Bob Hoskins plays Harold with incandescent intensity, while Helen Mirren brings queenly dignity to the role of his moll.



    And a future big name pops up in the last scene. As Harold's car pulls away from the Savoy, he finally comes face-to-face with his elusive foe in the shape of a grinning, gun-toting Pierce Brosnan.



    The terrific close-up showing Harold's look of appalled realisation - and resignation - is unforgettable.



    Amazingly, the encounter never happened in reality: Hoskins and the future James Bond didn't meet once during the shoot.

  4. #44
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redstar
    Re Long Good Friday, Great scene when the yacht goes into the dock with the sun glittering on the water, nice music very atmospheric, also like the scene shot in Brixton around Loughborough park when he visits "Erroll the Ponce". Anyone know where the pub that got blown up was filmed?
    The pub ( the lion and unicorn??)was a full scale set built on a vacant plot of land just off Wapping High Street in London E1, just a few yards along from Wapping Police Station. The area has been totally redeveloped over the years, the old Police Station is still there, allegedly the inspiration for the locale of Dixon of Dock Green, all the old warehouses have been turned into "new york loft apartements" with trendy wine bars at street level. In the seventies and early eighties Wapping was a favourie location evoking dickensian or victorain London. David Lynch filmed scenes for "The Elephant Man " in the area.

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by djdave

    Next time you watch it, keep an ear open for the boat scene near the end when Harold kills Jeff. Originally, Derek Thompson said that for ten years British soldiers had had shit running down their legs....but this was re-dubbed to say that they'd had shit flying at them for ten years. Once you know this, it stands out a mile 'cos the dubbing isn't perfect.
    Interesting thing about Derek Thompson - before his role in "Casualty" he played (ironically) an IRA terrorist in the superb "Harry's Game" - has anybody seen that one on TV again?



    Is it available on DVD by any chance?



    I'd love to watch it again.

  6. #46
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    Agreed that final scene of Hoskins in the car is superb. The way his face registers such a mixture of emotions from outrage to fear to final resignation is wonderful and a great lesson in acting for the camera.

  7. #47
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    Hi everyone. New to this game. Many years ago I watched the Long Good Friday with Bob Hoskins. I believe that this was the fore runner to many of the English Gangster type movies. However, I believe that Pierce Brosnan makes an appearance but does not have a speaking part. Any ideas....

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain mariocki's Avatar
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    Yes, he does. He's one of the terrorists in the swimming pool scene and is also the one who has the gun trained on Harold in the car as it pulls away from The Savoy in the final scene.



  9. #49
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    Pierce Brosnan has 2 scenes (billed as 1st Irishman ) one of him in the shower (which I think he says one line "Hi" ) and of course the end scene,Hoskins and Brosnan never met at all for that scene as it was filmed separately.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: England harryshand's Avatar
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    A worthy bump for one of Britain's best ever films which was was my British favourite until Dead Man's Shoes came along.



    Not sure if it's been answered but Harold's main mooring is now the site of Canary Wharf although St Katherines, King George V and London docks were also used in the film.



    I've just had the misfortune to buy and watch ''Sewers Of Gold'' aka ''The Great Riviera Bank Robbery'' aka ''Dirty Money'' which was made by ITC in 1979. The decision to drop TLGF and pay for complete drivel like Sewers of Gold must rank as one of the biggest cinematic clangers of all time.

  11. #51
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    ..but for me it doesn't wear well. There's a definite scent of the Sweeney. No bad thing you might say, except this was supposed to be a serious movie. But there are some clunking great cliches and I think a lot of dodgy editing. Yes it's a brilliant performance by Hoskins and I remember being impressed when I saw it. But the great pub-blowing-up scene looks tatty and implausible and compared to other Hoskins performances (Mona Lisa springs to mind) it's just the Lock Shmock and Two Smokers of its time. Punching above its weight.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickb
    ..but for me it doesn't wear well. There's a definite scent of the Sweeney. No bad thing you might say, except this was supposed to be a serious movie. But there are some clunking great cliches and I think a lot of dodgy editing. Yes it's a brilliant performance by Hoskins and I remember being impressed when I saw it. But the great pub-blowing-up scene looks tatty and implausible and compared to other Hoskins performances (Mona Lisa springs to mind) it's just the Lock Shmock and Two Smokers of its time. Punching above its weight.
    interesting point of view, however, I do not agree

  13. #53
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    "Punching above its weight" a contributor said.



    Nope. LONG GOOD FRIDAY was a solid champion of its time (28 years ago). Brit realism had too few high points since GET CARTER, before the explosion of neo-kitchen sinks celebrating Thatcher legacy in the 1990's.



    LONG GOOD FRIDAY got it all right, not least the frightening end. Folks have mentioned the kidnapping, but without a word about Helen Mirren's silent scream as she is driven off to rape, torture and certain death. A fate Hoskins promised to protect her from earlier in the story.

  14. #54
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Harold Shand
    Does anybody know anything more about the proposed remake. According to IMDB it has a provisional release date of 2011. I'm assuming this will be American, set in the current times. In my opinion that would wipe out most of the attraction of the original.
    It's listed (in IMDb Pro) as being made by Handmade Films, that's George Harrison's old production company. But they do give the location as Florida. The director is Newcastle born Paul Anderson, director of such gems as Mortal Kombat and writer of Resident Evil.



    But it's only listed as being "in development" so they're still trying to raise funds.



    Steve

  15. #55
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    The bleak ending is very Get Carter inspired.And while i really do like LGF some of it is contrived (ie -why does Derick Thompson idiotically and repeatedly goad Shand into killing him)- but then i think of overrated tripe like Sexy Beast - and all is forgiven.

    Just wondering whether the production had any threats(ie extortion) from the IRA at the time? as they were at their most active

    Curious to see what Yanks think of movie especially considering Shand's rant must be the most anti -USA in any movie!

  16. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by tali122
    some of it is contrived (ie -why does Derick Thompson idiotically and repeatedly goad Shand into killing him)

    Just wondering whether the production had any threats(ie extortion) from the IRA at the time? as they were at their most active.



    Curious to see what Yanks think of movie especially considering Shand's rant must be the most anti -USA in any movie!
    I do not recall the goading ? Do you meant towards the end ? I think he was just arguing with him and saying that the IRA were better equipped at handling situations than Harold was and Harold was not having any of that lip thrown at him.



    The only irish problem IIRC was changing the title from The Paddy Factor to TLGF,glad the title was changed as it is a better title to use imo.

  17. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Amethyst_Isle
    I do not recall the goading ? Do you meant towards the end ? I think he was just arguing with him and saying that the IRA were better equipped at handling situations than Harold was and Harold was not having any of that lip thrown at him.



    The only irish problem IIRC was changing the title from The Paddy Factor to TLGF,glad the title was changed as it is a better title to use imo.
    More half way thru the movie- and iirc he says(or rather goads) Shand on the lines of something like "you're just shit on their shoes"

    WHACK!

  18. #58
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    I really do not know what to make of this film. I knew the locations, then and as they are now, extremely well, and love it when it first hit the screens. But it seems a little dated now - nothing wrong with being stuck in the 1970's, BTW. Superb outting for Bob Hoskins. Haven't seen it from start to finish for years. I'll have to get the DVD out again.

  19. #59
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    Thanks for posting that, DB. It's a superb film which I first saw on VHS back in the early 80's, and now we have it on DVD. What a hard-hitting screenplay, made even more brutal by the swaggering music and rough-edged performances. Not too sure about Derek Thompson's acting though - he often seems a bit wooden.

    Helen Mirren simply oozes it.....

    I love the Hoskins line (to the Americans): Jesus, I knew the Yanks were laid back, but YOU two are in a f***in' coma!"

  20. #60
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    In my Top Ten wihout a doubt...



    The ONLY bit ( for me) that doesn't ring true is when Charley from Casualty ( Derek Thompson)

    has Helen Mirren in the lift and says the immortal lines to her...



    " I want to lick evey inch of you".... somehow a male nurse delivering such a killer line doesn't gel with me.



    I should have been given the role !!!!!!!!!!

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