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  1. #21
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    Great film,i got the audio book torrent of demonoid and its great,tells the story before the 2 yank backpackers arrive,and the voices are all the original cast.
    There's a book based on the movie? I'm interested, tell me more.

    A funny story about this flick. My uncle took me to see it when I was 7 or 8. Bad idea. I had call my dad come to the theater to pick me up after the attack on the moors. I vividly remember my uncle walking me up to the lobby to give me some time to calm down. I can remember the girl working at the concession stand telling my uncle I could go into the theater showing Stripes with Bill Murry and John Candy. I wanted nothing to do with that....I just wanted the hell out of there. I had nightmares for months and couldn't watch the movie in full for another 7 or 8 years. What a film! I pop it into the DVD player around Halloween every year. Good times.

  2. #22
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    An American Werewolf in London by John Landis.



    How does a werewolf get onto the Yorkshire Moors? Why do the citizens of a remote village allow two American backpackers to walk to their doom? What is it like to be Undead?



    John Landis' 1981 movie remains an unforgettable cinema experience. In this expanded version some twenty minutes of new story has been added, leading up to the violent and emotional climax on the streets of London.



    Reprising their roles from the movie, Jenny Agutter, Brian Glover and John Woodvine are reunited in this audio movie.



    Cast:

    Alex Price - Jenny Agutter

    David Kessler - Eric Myers

    Jack Goodman - William Durfis

    George Hackett - Brian Glover

    Doctor Hirsch - John Woodvine

    Nurse Gallagher - Eve Karpf

    Larry Talbot - Michael Roberts

    Inspector Villiers - David Bannerman

    Sergeant McManus - Mervyn Stutter

    The Kid - Mark Lowen

    Other parts were played by members of the cast.



    Based on the original screenplay by John Landis

    Music by Wilfredo Acosta

    Mixed by Paul Deeley in Dolby Surround

    Adapted, written and produced by Dirk Maggs.



    First broadcast on BBC Radio 1 in 1994.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Johnb Landis is being interviewed on BBC Breakfast in half an hour which reminded me that American Werewolf is being shown at the FrightFest in London tomorrow:



    index

  4. #24
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    The last time I saw AAWIL on the large screen was back in 1982. In fact, that was probably the last full-length feature film that I saw of my own choice



    I made up for it last night by seeing AAWIL once again on the large screen in surroundings that would have suited John Landis perfectly - indeed, it was also the sort of environment Jenny has said it should be seen in and a little similar to her first viewing.



    Most of the audience probably weren't born, or were at best toddlers, when it first came out but they thoroughly enjoyed it. There were many appreciative whistles and cheers when a certain nurse made her first appearance - and that recurred a number of times!

  5. #25
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain vincenzo's Avatar
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    I first saw it back in 1982 as well and then caught it again on a reissue double bill with Love At First Bite a year or so later.

  6. #26
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    I was too young to see it in the cinema on it's first release, so it was one of the first films I watched when we got our first video recorder in 1982.



    My parents usually went out on a Friday night and so I'd invited my friends around and we'd watch a horror film and my mother would have left us a little buffet of food.



    The mistake I made was to watch AAWIL on my own, as none of my friends were able to call around that night.



    I had the shivers from the very beginning, but the nightmare sequence where Jenny Agutter walks up to the hospital bed in the woods and he suddenly opens his eyes and gnashes his teeth made me jump ten feet in the air.



    I was probably around 15 years old at really glad when my parents got home. They enjoyed the film too, although I think it was a bit too gory for my Dad.




  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    I went to see this in the cinema back in the day and recall that one scene kinda freaked me out a bit - even more than any of the later gore. It was a dream sequence with pig-faced soldiers bursting into a family home and machine-gunning everyone. I've half a notion that when I watched the movie years later, on TV, this scene wasn't in it.



    I thought of this again recently because I was chatting to someone (much younger than me) who had watched the movie on dvd/video and they didn't seem to remember this scene at all. Was this scene really so scary it got chopped out of home releases.... ??



    Or is my memory like a pigs-ear....



    I had a quick browse on the web but they all seemed obsessed with the wolfie bits and the zombies.




  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: Germany Wolfgang's Avatar
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    It's in my DVD. They are wearing Nazi uniforms too.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain vincenzo's Avatar
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    I thought of this again recently because I was chatting to someone (much younger than me) who had watched the movie on dvd/video and they didn't seem to remember this scene at all. Was this scene really so scary it got chopped out of home releases.... ??

    Or is my memory like a pigs-ear....
    I recall the old BBC showings when they overdubbed the stronger swearing. The film was never cut by the BBFC and that scene was in every video I've seen of it.



    How times change. The film is 15-rated now.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Country: Spain Rowdon's Avatar
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    I saw this film when it came out in the UK. The first showing, I suppose, as it was at the NFT one Sunday morning, and was followed by John Landis doing a little Q and A session.



    My sister had seen it the previous year(?) in New York and had told me that it might have been made for me. I was gong to ask Landis whether he had in fact had me in mind when he made it, but I didn't, for fear of damaging my sister's opinion of my importance.



    Landis was asked, first off, whether he thought that young US directors were getting too much money thrown at them to make anything they wanted or something: I really can't remember the exact question but I know it was one that was being asked all over at that time ... anyway, he said "Oh - you want that speech do you?" and went into a short and sarcastic answer (not rude sarcastic, just "I've said all this before" sarcastic.) He was a bit rude-sarcastic in answer to the question "Why did you include the love scene between David Naughton and Jenny Agutter?" "Er ... because they were lovers?" (laughter from audience - personally i thought it a valid question). One audience member asked "Why did you cast Jenny Agutter?" "Because I've loved her for years" "Me too" said the Audience Member, his voice catching slightly. Was it aybody on this site?

    I also remember him talking about the two different posters used ...







    that the first one - "The one you have here", he mistakenly said - was put up around New York, but that Landis was told that it wouldn't work in the 'urban' neighbourhoods, as "That's just two white guys walking through Harlem", so they wanted something more "Raaaaooooaaaaagh" - to use his word. I think we only ever had the second one in England.



    I really, really wanted to say something but just didn't have the nerve. I wanted to say "I found the whole film believable - that a man turns into a wolf, that a werewolf tears a policeman's head off in Piccadilly Circus, even that a member of the undead in a Soho porn cinema whose whole face, including lips, has been ripped off, can still pronounce the letter 'M' ... but the bit that I found too unbelievable was that the chocolate dispenser on Tottenham Court Road station actually worked. That has literally never happened, as any Londoner will tell you."



    As I say, I didn't have the guts to say it. Is it too late now?





    I've just been rummaging through some old papers to see if I was right that I had Landis' autograph from that day; I remembered queuing up, and that the guy ahead of me gave him an old book about werewolf lore to sign (cool idea - was that anybody on this site?). And yes, I found it: he said "What shall I write?" and I said "just 'to Ben'", so now it says ... "Just to Ben, John Landis". He was a wag! (The ticket stub also shows it was at Leicester Square, Sunday November 8th, 10.30 am - it was the Q&A that was at the NFT.)



    Goodness, look at the time! Sorry to have kept you!

  11. #31
    Senior Member Country: Ireland
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    Isn't it (AWIL) due for re-issue?

    LUKEAFB, there was a send up of their films, but it was an episode of 'Route 66' called 'Lizard's Leg and Owlets Wing' with Boris Karloff, Peter Lorre and Lon Chaney Jr, in one scene Chaney sees a child in bed, Chaney is in full make-up but the kid said's he would never be scared of him no matter how he looked!

    AWIL was great! (except for Rik Mayall!)

  12. #32
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    Amusingly enough I just showed this to my daugther who thought it was fantastic. I was worried as she thinks the Grudge is a great film!

  13. #33
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain GoggleboxUK's Avatar
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    Amusingly enough I just showed this to my daugther who thought it was fantastic. I was worried as she thinks the Grudge is a great film!
    The Grudge IS a great film, especially the Japanese original. Even the Sarah Michelle Gellar version did it well. American Werewolf is better though, an all time great and definitely Landis' best work.

  14. #34
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    No doubt as to what I'm watching this evening - Halloween's coolest film:



    with the planet's hottest nurse!
























  15. #35
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    The film that changed my life: Edgar Wright

    An American Werewolf in London (John Landis, 1981)

    There's something about this movie that cast a kind of spell on me, and it's really influenced a lot of my work. When it first came out in 1981, I was six. There was an issue of Starburst, a now-defunct British sci-fi magazine, that had a picture on the cover of the lead actor, David Naughton, sitting in the cinema set with all the zombies. It was the bloodiest picture I'd ever seen. I was so horrified and hypnotised and I knew I had to see that movie!

    As a six-year-old I wanted to see the monsters, and then as a 14-year-old, when I finally saw it all the way through, it just blew my mind with how detailed it was and what an amazingly fun world had been created. It made me think: I want to make a film like that, a movie even half as good as that. I was spellbound.

    I love how it manages to do several things: it's laugh-out-loud funny; it's genuinely very scary, but it's got a lot of heart as well. You really care about the people in it. It's a horror and a comedy. I think that with it John Landis made one of the first pop culture-savvy films. It's incredibly idiosyncratic and there are jokes in there that wouldn't appear in anybody else's work.

    It's a movie that refers back to classic Hollywood and has a very clever soundtrack. Landis counter-scores the horror with 50s and 60s pop hits � songs that are not scary, such as different versions of "Blue Moon" and "Bad Moon Rising", which is so sly and fun. It seems like it's made with so much passion for the material, and because of that, for me, it's easily Landis's best movie. The use of music gives me the chills every time. Naughton's first transformation into a werewolf an incredible sequence, and before it, when Sam Cooke's beautiful version of "Blue Moon" begins playing and Naughton is sitting on the couch reading, you know that something spectacular is about to happen. It then cuts to a Mickey Mouse toy that's just sitting on the TV, observing this breathtaking transformation. It's a brilliantly surreal shot which doesn't comment at all on what it's supposed to mean. I love that.

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