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  1. #61
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    Good to see BOB is doing the rounds, wish it would shown 'big' down south!



    I know I used to go with me Da to see War films that were released late 60's early 70's so I probably saw it at the time of initial release (Blue Max comes to mind as well, about Zeppelins I recall) as he never missed anything concerning the two World Wars



    Enjoy the Movie if you're going, wish I was!

  2. #62
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Good to see BOB is doing the rounds, wish it would shown 'big' down south!
    And across the Atlantic. I would love to see this in a theatre. Superb film.



    I know I used to go with me Da to see War films that were released late 60's early 70's so I probably saw it at the time of initial release (Blue Max comes to mind as well, about Zeppelins I recall) as he never missed anything concerning the two World Wars
    This was true for me as well.

  3. #63
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Good to see BOB is doing the rounds, wish it would shown 'big' down south!

    I know I used to go with me Da to see War films that were released late 60's early 70's so I probably saw it at the time of initial release (Blue Max comes to mind as well, about Zeppelins I recall) as he never missed anything concerning the two World Wars



    Enjoy the Movie if you're going, wish I was!
    "The Blue Max" was a not bad film with George Peppard, Jeremey Kemp and James Mason. It was mainly about WW1 german fighter pilots, and Peppards obsession with winning the "Blue Max" medal, no Zeppelins as I recall but there was a film of the same period titled "Zeppelin" with Michael York, perhaps you are thinking of that one.

  4. #64
    Member Country: UK
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    What a great movie! I too saw this when it was first released. The attention to detail was pretty amazing, but I could never understand why they replaced Adolf Galland with the Falke character (only a small fly in the ontment, but unnecessary I thought).



    Any chance of this coming to the North West?

  5. #65
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    Well - went to see the old girl last night (Battle of Britain that is) and came out with mixed emotions.



    On the plus side - obviously wonderful to see it on the big screen again, and whatever else I may say below, bear in mind that I still felt privileged to see it once more up there on screen.



    However . . .



    On the negative side - God, what an awful copy they used . . !



    The sound was truly atrocious, like one of those old LP records thats been listened to too much and has become too scratched.



    The picture at times was worse than an old home movie - it was the most scratched movie I've ever seen in a cinema - what a shame - some scenes were okay, but others were so bad they had to be seen to be believed!



    Worst of all was the jumpy and missing sequences - and not just missing, but chopped-off in mid sentence sometimes! For those who have seen Harry Enfield doing the Mister Chulmondley-Warner sketches, it was EXACTLY like that at times - dear oh dear!



    To quote Christopher Plummer last night in one famous scene:



    He normally says - "Don't ever let me see you doing a victory roll over my airfield again, clear?"



    What he said last night was - "Don't . . ver . . . over . . . clea . . ?" (You would also need to add in a constant scratchy / hissing background sound to this, to get the full effect of how bad it was!)



    The blue-ray DVD of BofB is due out soon, and my son who was with me stated that if the blue-ray was as bad as this, he'll be keeing his money (I assured him it probably would not be).



    I wish someone at Cineworld had taken the time to say, "well, if we're going to show it, lets at least show a decent copy"



    So - swings and roundabouts with this one . . . nice to see it, but a very big "but" I'm afraid.




  6. #66
    Senior Member Country: England Maurice's Avatar
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    Telegraph.co.uk :



    Forty years after its release, the makers of THE BATTLE OF BRITAIN recall a film of stupendous ambition. Mark Burman reports....



    Capturing all this on film still seems something of a mad undertaking. Try setting a movie largely in the sky, featuring a battle with no clearly defined beginning or end whose terrain is the boundless blue, marked only by ever-changing clouds and shifting sun.



    The aeroplanes used in filming were already museum pieces, but so many were needed that they constituted the 35th-largest air force in the world at the time.



    Not since Howard Hughes sent men crashing to their real deaths in the 1930 HELL'S ANGELS had such a cinematic flying circus been assembled.



    But turning the sky into a film set, in the face of terrible weather, nearly bankrupted its producers and drove director Guy Hamilton - who had made GOLDFINGER and would direct more Bond movies - close to despair....



    .......Skeets Kelly and John Jordan, Britain's best aerial cameramen and quite fearless. Both would later meet their deaths filming in the air.



    Jordan, who had lost a leg during the filming of YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE, devised the terrifying "parashoot", which allowed him to hang suspended under a helicopter, often at 6,000 feet, as fighters hurtled above, below and past him....



    With the availability of CGI technology today, and ever-present health and safety rules, it's unlikely such risks will ever be taken again, but for those cinematic few it remains an unforgettable experience.



    What's more, after 40 years, it remains the definitive depiction of war in the air.

  7. #67
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    The air battle scenes were brilliantly done, but for me, the film was spoiled by having too many female extras (as well as Susannah York) sporting late 1960's hairstyles in a film set nearly thirty years earlier and the "relationship" between the Christopher Plummer and Susannah York characters, which ruined the pacing of the film. In fact, their scenes together should have been left on the cutting room floor

  8. #68
    Senior Member Country: England
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    In the Battle of Britain, what is the relationship between Robert Shaws chareacter and Iain Mcshanes??? I get the impression its a Father and Son. Especially when he says "cut out the sir" Does anyone know??



    cheers

  9. #69
    Senior Member Country: England
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    They are definitely not supposed to be father and son. However McShane is portraying a Sergeant pilot, which were rare in 1940 with most flying personnel being commissioned officers. Perhaps there is a subtext that Shaw's character feels a certain protection towards McShane?

  10. #70
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    yeah possibly. Youd think they would make it a bit clearer

  11. #71
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    They are definitely not supposed to be father and son. However McShane is portraying a Sergeant pilot, which were rare in 1940 with most flying personnel being commissioned officers. Perhaps there is a subtext that Shaw's character feels a certain protection towards McShane?
    They weren't that rare, even in fighter squadrons. But there was an artificial class distinction maintained between them. Sergeant pilots, even the best ones, were often excluded from the officers mess



    Steve

  12. #72
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Strange though how he treats him like a son. "cut out the sir" "Get in the car boy" then he ends up staying at the COs house. I just think they could have made it a bit more clear.

  13. #73
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Strange though how he treats him like a son. "cut out the sir" "Get in the car boy" then he ends up staying at the COs house. I just think they could have made it a bit more clear.
    Robert Shaw's character is older and a senior rank. He's just looking after his men. He respects Ian's character as a pilot and has just been telling him off for getting shot down so after he's done that he acts more friendly and caring. That's just good management of the men you command



    Steve

  14. #74
    Senior Member Country: England
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    yeah maybe. I still feel they are related or summit tho. Even when the flight sgt told Shaw that 2 pilots were missing, he seems to say Mcshanes characters name in a bit of a more dour voice. Like hes special to Shaw.

  15. #75
    Senior Member Country: England earlb's Avatar
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    Perhaps they're lovers

  16. #76
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
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    The scene where he stays in the CO's house is (if my memory is correct) just after the Sergeant's wife and children have just been killed in an air raid. Shaw's and McShane's characters are then shown not only to be CO and Sergeant but also as men on active service with families . This illustrates the added sacrifice of family life, the worry of what their family are suffering in the blitz as well as of course the possible sacrifice of their own lives.



    When McShane's family are killed Shaw sees him as a younger colleague who has just lost his wife and children. That would be why he stayed over at his home, because his house had been destroyed. During that time McShane had no one else to turn to, in fact it speaks volumes for Shaw as a commanding officer that the young lad turned to him for help, hence the Father/Son feeling about the scenes.

  17. #77
    Senior Member Country: England
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    spot on freddy. your prob right. Lovers, hmmmmmm lets hope not

  18. #78
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I saw this yesterday, taped off Film Four which ran a superb OAR print. What a terrible mess this film is, badly constructed, repetitive, boring. Olivier managed to create some sort of character study but the rest of the great cast were wasted in walk-on-walk-offs. I never knew who was in the plane and only guessed that Michael Caine copped it from the expression on his dog's face. And what a thankless role for Susannah York - who gave her that 60s wig? And one final thing that sums up the sloppy movie-making on display here: at the end there's a short credit roll of co-propducers etc and then a caption listing the casualties in the real Battle of Britain. Surely the roll call of heroes should have come up immediately, followed by the credits. Sloppy, sloppy, sloppy.

  19. #79
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    Hi there,

    One of my favourite war films was Guy Hamilton's 1969 epic The Battle of Britain.

    The dogfights were perhaps the best ones on screen,particularly the final one,which was delivered in silence except for a radio girl trying to call out for a pilot,assumed killed,and Walton's stirring music.

    However,the scene where little man Ralph Richardson stands up to big man Curt Jurgens,is one of the best exchanges,I think,in cinema history. Does anyone know the full verbatim of that scene?

    Also I thought it was one of Laurence Olivier's best films,playing the worried Air Chief Marshall Dowding,who knew the RAF had too few aircraft,piloted by a lot of unexperienced young men,all that against the might of the powerful Luftwaffe.

    His best line,when asked by the air minister (Anthony Nichols) if the comments by the German

    Embassy in Washington about the RAF's figures being inaccurate were true;

    "I'm not interested in propaganda,minister. If the figures are right,they'll give up. If they are wrong,they'll be in London within a week."

    Ta Ta,

    Marky B thumbs_u
    Lord Dowding particularly disliked Air Marshal being misspent with a double L

  20. #80
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    I lived in Hadleigh Suffolk when the film was made and had a 'ground's eye view' of some of the battle scenes I think. I still live under a Duxford flight path and see historic airplanes fly overhead.

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