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  1. #61
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    If The Eagle has Landed is a remake of Went the Day Well then Went the Day Well is really a remake of the excellent Miss Grant Goes to the Door in which the evil Hun invaders are no match for Mary Clare and Martita Hunt (and it has some handy advice about how to make your sugar ration last longer too!)

  2. #62
    Senior Member Country: Scotland julian_craster's Avatar
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    Check out the BFI book on Went the Day Well ? by Penelope Houston, one of first in their Film Classics series

  3. #63
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliekane
    Love the scene where Mervyn Johns is firing a machine gun out of the window and someone brings him a cup of tea - with a saucer !
    Standards must be maintained, even when one is fighting for ones very existence



    Steve

  4. #64
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Brett
    Did anyone ever own up to The Eagle Has Landed being a remake?
    No, it just has some similarities that remind us of Went the Day Well?



    The Eagle Has Landed has the whole story about kidnapping Churchill which isn't touched on in WtDW. Do we really know why the Germans are here in WtDW? Is it to prepare for a full invasion?



    Steve

  5. #65
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    No, it just has some similarities that remind us of Went the Day Well?



    TEHL [sic] has the whole story about kidnapping Churchill which isn't touched on in WtDW. Do we really know why the Germans are here in WtDW? Is it to prepare for a full invasion?



    Steve
    I'm not totally convinced that it can be considered a remake - though can see why some might think it so.



    Almost any film revolving around a relatively small-scale Nazi landing in the UK is going to be based in an area of small population - a country village or closed community such as a monastery. The only real similarity to my mind is the fifth columnist in both - and the eventual failure, of course!

  6. #66
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lord Brett
    The good news is that I managed to catch Went the Day Well, which I've wanted to see for years and never got around to. The bad news is that I was home to watch it because I've been off work with the sickness bug that's doing the rounds.



    I agree with Fellwanderer that the portrayal of Germans in WTDW as ill-mannered oafs has dated somewhat (David Farrar showing his true colours by his terrible table manners long before he is revealed as a drunken monster). The problem with The Eagle Has Landed is more that director John Sturges was well past his best by this time, and was simply unable to inject enough pace and urgency into any of his seventies films. He even made the only boring Clint Eastwood western, Joe Kidd.



    Did anyone ever own up to The Eagle Has Landed being a remake?
    Don't know about The Eagle Has Landed being a remake, but I remember seeing an interview with Jack Higgins, in which he said he got the idea for the novel from something a Russian soldier said to him when he was in the army in Berlin. Never been sure whether to believe that or not.

  7. #67
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    No, it just has some similarities that remind us of Went the Day Well?



    Eagle Has Landed has the whole story about kidnapping Churchill which isn't touched on in WtDW. Do we really know why the Germans are here in WtDW? Is it to prepare for a full invasion?



    Steve
    In that case, the Eagle Has Landed is really a remake of Warn that Man in which Raymond Lovell is at the centre of a dastardly plot to kidnap Churchill.

  8. #68
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainWaggett
    In that case, the Eagle Has Landed is really a remake of Warn that Man in which Raymond Lovell is at the centre of a dastardly plot to kidnap Churchill.
    Thanks, Cap't I'm sure that was what I was actually meaning - I remember Gordon Harkness being mentioned.

  9. #69
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    No, it just has some similarities that remind us of Went the Day Well?



    The Eagle Has Landed has the whole story about kidnapping Churchill which isn't touched on in WtDW. Do we really know why the Germans are here in WtDW? Is it to prepare for a full invasion?



    Steve
    Yes, watched WtDW this afternoon. Preparation for invasion is mentioned near the beginning, and there is a line by the old boy, talking to camera in the grave yard at the end, along the lines of

    ' Hitlers tried his invasion the next day, and you remember how that finished'



    good quote as well.

    Mrs Fraser- 'George, do you know what morale is ?'



    George - 'sumfink the wops ain't got '



    That would get deleted in a modern remake .

  10. #70
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    Brilliant film of the forties, depicting a small rural English village under siege from Fith Columnnists. Very watchable and fairly hard hitting for its day.

  11. #71
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suzanne
    Brilliant film of the forties, depicting a small rural English village under siege from Fith Columnnists. Very watchable and fairly hard hitting for its day.
    A good choice - which was shown again last week.



    I'm not sure that I'd agree that it was hard hitting as I thought it seemed very much what I would have expected from wartime propaganda - warning the populace to be wary and show no mercy to the enemy.



    Great to compare to the film from some 30 years later which shows how attitudes had changed - The Eagle Has Landed.

  12. #72
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fellwanderer
    A good choice - which was shown again last week.

    I'm not sure that I'd agree that it was hard hitting as I thought it seemed very much what I would have expected from wartime propaganda - warning the populace to be wary and show no mercy to the enemy.

    Great to compare to the film from some 30 years later which shows how attitudes had changed - The Eagle Has Landed.
    A classic of course. Screenplay by Graham Greene. Putting it in context Fellwanderer, there is a seen where a boy is seen being shot. According to my all seeing/all knowing film studies tutor, the death of children in this violent way is not seen on screen even today. Even Hitchcock baulked at actually showing the little boy being blown to pieces before our very eyes in Sabotage And the violence of the women was quite shocking? That dear old postmistress whacking the German soldier made me jump and still does.



    By the way, hello Suzanne. I was only thinking today I only know one person called Suzanne and she is a love. Welcome to Britmoviedom

  13. #73
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatllbetheday
    A classic of course. Screenplay by Graham Greene. Putting it in context Fellwanderer, there is a seen where a boy is seen being shot. According to my all seeing/all knowing film studies tutor, the death of children in this violent way is not seen on screen even today. Even Hitchcock baulked at actually showing the little boy being blown to pieces before our very eyes in Sabotage And the violence of the women was quite shocking? That dear old postmistress whacking the German soldier made me jump and still does.
    My riposte to that would be that Sabotage was filmed in 1936 whereas WTDW? was filmed when the country was fighting for its life. In that respect, I think they were trying to strengthen the country's morale - you've got to do unpleasant things in the fight for national survival.

  14. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatllbetheday
    A classic of course. Screenplay by Graham Greene. Putting it in context Fellwanderer, there is a seen where a boy is seen being shot. According to my all seeing/all knowing film studies tutor, the death of children in this violent way is not seen on screen even today. Even Hitchcock baulked at actually showing the little boy being blown to pieces before our very eyes in Sabotage And the violence of the women was quite shocking? That dear old postmistress whacking the German soldier made me jump and still does.



    By the way, hello Suzanne. I was only thinking today I only know one person called Suzanne and she is a love. Welcome to Britmoviedom
    Thank you for your feedback. Thank you for your lovely welcome. Yes all Suzannes are great people to know.

  15. #75
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fellwanderer
    My riposte to that would be that Sabotage was filmed in 1936 whereas WTDW? was filmed when the country was fighting for its life. In that respect, I think they were trying to strengthen the country's morale - you've got to do unpleasant things in the fight for national survival.
    Agreed, under extreme circumstances but most propoganda films were intended to show the British carrying on in a tight-lipped but cheerful manner. Ours not to reason why ..... you know the rest. Graham Greene was not exactly a patriot. As we now know, quite friendly with certain famous "traitors" of the 1950's. In fact he was very dubious about this country and its renowned "decency". I think this film shows how everybody, not just Nazis could be very nasty.

  16. #76
    Senior Member Country: Europe Bernardo's Avatar
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    Members really need to place themselves at the time this film was conceived. 'We' had watched countries that seemed rock solid fall like dominoes in what seemed like days, our army suffered a 'glorious' defeat at Dunquerque. The Hun is coming was a reallity, Hitler said so, troops were rehearsing how and what to destroy and where to regroup.

    So all those acting probably did it with feeling. I don't think that, at the time, propaganda would be the correct name for the motivation to make the film as that word is now contaminated with subtle truth twisting and distortion. Now the film looks rather quaint and one expects Captain Waggett, sorry! Mainwaring to appear nevertheless it is a good historical record of the time and we should be pleased that we are not in their position. Locals here in the East swear that a German expeditionary force landed at Shingle Street (remote coast near Woodbridge) but were secretly beaten back by the way.

    Nice to see that generation of actors go through their paces and so well motivated to stiffen the resolve of the population and ready them for what may come.

  17. #77
    Senior Member Country: England earlb's Avatar
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    As a lad I was told Germans bayoneted babies and other nasty things. You have to put yourself in that space and that time to understand the Villagers vicious assault on their enemies. This was all very real and I believe the film conveyed those fears of the time. I couldn't expect anyone born after the war to understand. I remember as a lad when I found spent condoms and played with them as balloons, my Mother would say "Ohhh throw them away dear, Hitler drops poison balloons to kill little boys with such things".

  18. #78
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    I quite agree with Bernardo and earlb - as an historian, I've always found it relatively easy to empathise with previous generations.



    I don't see WTDW? as propaganda per se but more as a morale booster so I'm as confident as I can be as a "Baby Boomer" that it was a pretty accurate reflection of feelings in this country.



    I still think it is a good idea to try to watch it and The Eagle Has Landed in tandem so that one can appreciate the changing attitudes over the years.

  19. #79
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    Hi Bernardo. I liked your comments on my choice of film WTDW. It threw up a few fresh ideas that I will now ponder on. Suzanne

  20. #80
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by earlb
    As a lad I was told Germans bayoneted babies and other nasty things.
    Just how old are you? That was the propaganda they spread during the first world war, not the second



    Steve

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