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  1. #21
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DB7
    I share Richards's admiration for the skill and economy of Roy Baker's direction.
    Baker cut his nautical teeth in that other classic British movie of 1955,

    which helped launch the film career of Patrick McGoohan.......

    On a more serious note Baker based his Titanic movie on a very evocative book published in 1955, written long before the revisionism of the last twenty years. Some have argued that it was this book that reinvigorated the legend of the Titanic.




  2. #22
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    I worked on "A Night to Remember" in the optical department at Denham England. I worked there 35 years and have been retired 25 years. My old boss is still alive. He was a clapper boy in 1939 when Charles Laughton, Donat and many more...were around.

  3. #23
    Super Moderator Country: Scotland
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    Hi opticals, welcome to the forum. Can I ask, what was the name of your old boss?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    Baker based his Titanic movie on a very evocative book...
    I skimmed the article, so perhaps I'm mistaken, but is there a single mention in there of Eric Ambler? Baker did not base "his" movie on anything. The producer William MacQuitty optioned the rights to Walter Lord's book. He hired Eric Ambler to write the screenplay.



    If you analyze the article, much of it is centered around content and character. Those were contributed by Ambler, based on Lord's research.



    This is one of the worst tendencies of auteurists -- to go back in film history and reapportion all significant creative credit to virtually all directors without reference to reality. That's not how movies were made in those days, especially most British films made at Rank under John Davis.



    I'm a great admirer of some of Baker's films, but he was no Hitchcock (or even Michael Powell).

  5. #25
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    Jeffrey Richards was my tutor for the Popular Culture course at Lancaster University. His lectures were attended by many students who were not actually reading History consequently the lecture theatre was always packed.

    And yes for all of you who remember the History Man Lancaster University really is that bloody awful.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Country: Vietnam hankoler's Avatar
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    The best film ever about the Titanic as far as im concerned

  7. #27
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    I liked the CGI depictions of the ship's break-up, but hated the predominant Love Triangle theme, as if that was The Important Thing during this historic event. "Why? Wasn't there enough drama with 1700 deaths? These filmmakers need a love triangle to improve the drama?"



    I still find the recent TITANIC offensive because of that. The only gratuity it achieves is that teenage-girls' money financed this film's box-office bonanza instead of teenage-boys.

  8. #28
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristineCB
    I liked the CGI depictions of the ship's break-up, but hated the predominant Love Triangle theme.
    Totally agree with you Christine. If the whole love triangle element could have been edited out and replaced with some real drama the film may have had more worth. As it stands, it trivialises the deaths of so many people. I also remember seeing moments from A Night To Remember crop up from time to time (eg the people on the decks playing with the ice as it is shaved off the 'berg).



    Bats.

  9. #29
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    Exactly. T's filmmakers preferred to deny any of the other death-struggles - of which there were so many. I take my hat off to the filmmakers because 'we' got to sit out in some of the boats and hear the cries and pleas. and were witness to some of the decisions that were made to help and not.



    NIGHT also benefits from having Clifton Webb, sans shotgun and that tricky grandfather clock. He - like Ronald Colman and many others of that era - donate an aura of respectability that CGI and teen heart-throbs never will.



    I think there's still a LOT of storytelling about the Titanic to be done. I'd like to see the hours of rescue, onboard those vessels who approached and didn't know what they'd see, or could believe it. Or how those rescues affected the rescuers.



    Those would take creativity and imagination, and couldn't use napalm explosions, automatic weapons fire or even aliens radiating sea-monsters for one final assault on mankind.



    In other words - "no hope of ever being filmed".

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by hankoler
    The best film ever about the Titanic as far as im concerned
    Amen. A masterfiece of film making - especially when you consider the limited budget and special effects!

    The movie drew heavily from pre-eminent Titanic-historian Walter Lord's books and research.

    Having recently crossed the Atlantic (Westbound - Southampton to New York) on the Queen Mary 2, I can attest to the bonds all passengers on that route must feel since that fateful night of April 14, 1912. For example - the path taken by modern ocean liners is pretty much exactly in line with that of Titanic.... she was just one day out of New York before she sank... and just a few miles south of the Grand Banks and relatively shallow water.



    The Queen Mary 2 has a map showing the location of the sinking and traces the QM2's own path along the route and alongside the disaster site. The QM2's ship's horn is sounded as the site is passed...eerily, it's passed within just a few hours either side of the actual time of night that the Titanic hit the iceberg.

  11. #31
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    This is going to be on as part of the BBC's British cinema season, in case anyone didn't know...

  12. #32
    Senior Member Country: Australia
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    While watching this excellent film look out for Sean Connery playing the part of a deck-hand.

    Also Derren Nesbitt, playing the stoker seen holding the oar on an upturned lifeboat after the Titanic goes down.



    Dave.

  13. #33
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    Is Sam Kydd in it ?

  14. #34
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChristineCB

    NIGHT also benefits from having Clifton Webb, sans shotgun and that tricky grandfather clock. He - like Ronald Colman and many others of that era - donate an aura of respectability that CGI and teen heart-throbs never will.
    ChristineCB: Clifton Webb was the star of the US 1953 film 'Titanic', not 'NTR'.

  15. #35
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    Rennie, true. I admit I wouldn't hire him after his dastardly deeds towards lovely Gene Tierney! I'd have understood it if he'd been killing all her potential suitors, but no - he wanted to kill her! Good grief - even Rex Harrison had a superior option for her company!

  16. #36
    Senior Member Country: Canada
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    A night to remember. I have dvd's of the three main films that were released. The 1953 version starring Clifton Webb and Barbara Stanwick, this version centered around the lives of a family who boarded the ill fated voyage,special effects for that period was ok. The best version was the 1958 British made version starring Kenneth More. The 1997 version starring Kate Winslet,the special effects were excellent,but the story concerning Kate was not that important. I still prefer the 1958 version,more factural than the latest version.

  17. #37
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    A Night to Remember (1958) with Kenneth More is being shown on BBC2 on Tue, 21 Aug at 12:40



    Steve

  18. #38
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    The 1958 movie is the only one that holds any attraction for me. It's pretty accurate historically, has the minimum of fictional embellishments, superb special effects, great acting and truly brings out the gravity of this legendary tragedy.



    In my opinion, all other versions pale into insignificance beside it.

  19. #39
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Does anyone recall this? Sometime in the late 90's (1998 I think), I saw a screening of NTR at the NFT. Roy Ward Baker was interviewed beforehand, and many of his friends (Moore, Lom, Syms) were in the audience reminiscing about their work with Roy. The version of NTR then shown was one I have never seen before or after. It included a scene where More, from the capsized lifeboat, fishes out the body of a child (unfortunately an obvious doll) and breaks down. It also omitted the reassuring eplogue:



    But this is not the end of the story -- for their sacrifice was not in vain. Today there are lifeboats for all. Unceasing radio vigil and, in the North Atlantic, the international ice patrol guards the sea lanes making them safe for the peoples of the world.



    This last omission does make a slight difference to the discussion on "melodrama" which originally opened this thread.

  20. #40
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    rskershaw - yes, I've seen that scene... don't ask me where or when because I've moved around this world some over the past 50 years...



    Maybe it was while I was in Bermuda in mid-1970s and they used to broadcast formerly unopened movie reels on the TV (when the station was working) and one could catch pistine UK movies on the local telly (unfortunately, the reels were sometimes played out of order...)



    But, yes, I've seen that scene.

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