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  1. #81
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    The German Titanic is available on an All Region DVD from the usual suspects ... it's very good.



    I'd very much like to see that, but the only copy I've come across online is a Region 1 from Amazon.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by 716Jones
    I'd very much like to see that, but the only copy I've come across online is a Region 1 from Amazon.
    I saw it at the NFT years ago. There was some court room scene set after the disaster in which a German survivor starts screaming hysterically when asked about her recollections of the night.



    The laughter of the audience still makes me smile.



    The film contained such characters as Lord Canterbury(!) , it was all German war propaganda stuff .

  3. #83
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    The following is the text of a review I have written about A Night To Remember:



    I don't wish to belabour comparisons between A Night To Remember (Dir: Roy Baker, 1958) and James Cameron's Titanic (which, you will recall, sank without trace) except to say that those who know what's what, probably also know which is which. And those who don't.....well.....more's the pity for them.



    Is A Night To Remember Kenneth More's finest (on-screen) two hours? Hard for me to say - it is too long since I have seen either Reach for The Sky or North West Frontier for me to give a definitive answer to that question. But his performance in A Night To Remember must surely be among the contenders.



    What More is particularly good at conveying is a sense of humour, a sense of boyish enthusiasm and a certain moderation and steadiness of character - what Hemingway called "grace under pressure". And his virtues, in this regard, are fully displayed in this film.



    A Night To Remember is as painstakingly accurate a depiction of the final two hours of RMS Titanic as the film's makers could create. As others have pointed out, the makers of the film decided that the story of the ship's demise was fully moving and dramatic enough in itself not to require the addition of an artificial love story. And they were right.



    In one sense, A Night To Remember becomes a film about the ways in which different human beings face imminent death. Some with equanimity, some with reluctant acceptance and others without either. And, of course, nobody knows how they are going to react until such a thing happens to them. This is a part of its fascination. Another part is to witness the gradual cracking and then breaking down of the social order on the ship as the inevitable approaches. And in the midst of this the captain, officers and crew of the doomed vessel emerge with largely exemplary courage, steadiness and discipline.



    Perhaps, once the drama is done, the film does become a little speechy and preachy in its final ten minutes, and perhaps also some of the early shots of the Titanic at sea do look a little artificial by contemporary standards. But these are minor flaws in what is otherwise a well told true story and a skillfully made and effective film.




    As ever, I would be interested in reading your own thoughts and feelings about the film...^^

  4. #84
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    RftS was really the role More was born for, in the case of any Titanic-related film the actors somehow seem secondary figures and the imposing vessel the lead. Ward-Baker's is imho the definitive version (far better than Cameron's glossy love story) but I've not yet got round to viewing Selpin's propaganda take on the disaster.

  5. #85
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DB7
    Ward-Baker's is imho the definitive version (far better than Cameron's glossy love story) but I've not yet got round to viewing Selpin's propaganda take on the disaster.
    I agree about RWBs version being the best/definitve Titanic film ..... it's a shame Cameron didn't jettison the love story part of the film and concentrate on making a 'straight' version of the disaster. That could, IMHO, have been something to behold. Selpin's version is actually a very good film. The propaganda (crooked British businessmen exploiting the people etc) doesn't detract from what is a pretty accurate account of that night. The effects are pretty decent too. Well worth a look.

  6. #86
    Senior Member Country: UK Moor Larkin's Avatar
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    Night To Remember was clearly a first class film about a First Class disaster.



    The book is well worth reading too.




  7. #87
    Senior Member Country: Ireland Edward G's Avatar
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    Moor Larkin,

    A "First Class Disaster"?

    Not to be disrespectful, but from what I've read about Titanic it was a disaster for 2nd and especially 3rd class. "First class" mainly did OK, survival-wise, thanks to thier proximity on the upper-decks and therefore arriving first at the lifeboats, although there were notable examples of nobility and courage - epecially Isador Struss and his young wife.....A compelling story and I agree that Roy Ward Baker's 1958 version is dramatically superior to James Cameron's juggernaut movie - so much so that Cameron duplicated at least 4 major shots!

    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    Night To Remember was clearly a first class film about a First Class disaster.



    The book is well worth reading too.




  8. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moor Larkin
    Night To Remember was clearly a first class film about a First Class disaster.
    A pun like that is far too clever for me.



    What I left out of my review - but what is repeatedly emphasized in the film - is its highly critical view of the class structure and the way in which it places a sliding scale on the value of peoples' lives depending upon which strata of society they occupy. This is most dramatically illustrated by the way in which the Steerage Class passengers are forcibly held below decks until the First Class passengers have been safely deposited in the lifeboats.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by DB7
    RftS was really the role More was born for...
    I agree with you. The particular qualities that More is good at conveying are precisely those which are called for in this role. I don't think that any other British actor could have done a better job in the part.

  10. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bleach2
    What I left out of my review - but what is repeatedly emphasized in the film - is its highly critical view of the class structure and the way in which it places a sliding scale on the value of peoples' lives depending upon which strata of society they occupy. This is most dramatically illustrated by the way in which the Steerage Class passengers are forcibly held below decks until the First Class passengers have been safely deposited in the lifeboats.


    And that clearly was the intention of the film. Strong stuff for the 1950's. This was not ostensibly a 'rebel' film, Kenneth More didn't do those, but I think it made its point all the more strongly for that reason

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by thatllbetheday
    And that clearly was the intention of the film. Strong stuff for the 1950's. This was not ostensibly a 'rebel' film, Kenneth More didn't do those, but I think it made its point all the more strongly for that reason
    That's fair enough, but I think it is also fair to say that intentions are not the same things as outcomes.



    As for Kenny More, I think that he might have been more of a genuine rebel than you are inclined to think.



    According to his Wikipedia entry (not an altogether reliable source, I admit):



    "In 1959, Rank's John Davis gave permission for More to work outside his contract to appear in The Guns of Navarone. More, however, made the mistake of heckling and swearing at Davis at a BAFTA dinner at the Dorchester, losing both the role (which went to David Niven) and his contract with Rank."



    How many stars in "the biz" at any given time would be prepared to risk their careers in this way? More did.



    As for your more substantial point - yes - A Night To Remember does have quite a pronounced socialist list.

  12. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    it's a shame Cameron didn't jettison the love story part of the film and concentrate on making a 'straight' version of the disaster. That could, IMHO, have been something to behold.


    I agree

  13. #93
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    Well, I'll watch A Night To Remember when I notice it is on TV.



    Titanic, I went to see at the flicks with a mate. While I don't think it was terrible, I couldn't help but laugh when my chum stated rather loudly when the credits rolled, "Thank Christ, I thought that ship would never sink." I wasn't the only one laughing either. I haven't seen Titanic since, mind.



    I think I made up for his discomfort when he saw the earlier film (courtesy of your's truly) soon afterwards. When I think of this I think it is an excellent example of British filmaking. Titanic in comparison is an opportunity wasted.



    Kenneth More was a perfect casting, IMHO.

  14. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neil1889
    Kenneth More was a perfect casting, IMHO.
    I must admit that having now watched both A Night To Remember and North West Frontier.....I've grown quite fond of Kenneth More. He's got a really pleasant screen presence and he just exudes...well...all of the qualities that I mentioned in the review. There's nobody else quite like him. I'm looking forward (at some point ) to watching Sink The Bismark! (which I haven't seen since I was a kid) and - more to the point.

  15. #95
    Senior Member Country: UK CaptainWaggett's Avatar
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    A Night to Remember is available from Play.com for �5 with fancy extras and everything!

  16. #96
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    Hi Bleach



    I watched "A Night To Remember" years ago and, as so many more members have already stated, Kenny More was outstanding. In glorious b & w this version didn't need all the love interest, Hollywood type of gloss etc to be effective. Kenny More gave his usual, competent British 'steady as she goes' performance in this well directed 50s film. What a great pity that the Rank Organisation didn't produce more of the same at Pinewood-they might still be in the film business! As for "Sink The Bismarck", again, Kenny More gave another stirling performance, quiet, dignified and determined to bring an end to the threat of the Bismarck-you can almost feel the relief at the end of the film when he walks across Trafalgar Square.



    CliveT

  17. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliveT
    Hi Bleach
    I watched "A Night To Remember" years ago and, as so many more members have already stated, Kenny More was outstanding. In glorious b & w this version didn't need all the love interest, Hollywood type of gloss etc to be effective. Kenny More gave his usual, competent British 'steady as she goes' performance in this well directed 50s film. What a great pity that the Rank Organisation didn't produce more of the same at Pinewood-they might still be in the film business! As for "Sink The Bismarck", again, Kenny More gave another stirling performance, quiet, dignified and determined to bring an end to the threat of the Bismarck-you can almost feel the relief at the end of the film when he walks across Trafalgar Square.



    CliveT
    While agreeing that Kenneth More gave a very good performance in NTR, I feel, above all, it was a wonderful ensemble piece, full of (now) well-known faces playing small parts with no grandstanding. Something British movies excel at IMHO.


  18. #98
    Senior Member Country: Australia ShirlGirl's Avatar
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    I think Kenneth More is one of the most underrated of British actors. He had a lot of good roles and always seems to have been well-cast. I doubt anyone else could have bettered him as Douglas Bader, he was excellent. And so funny/adorable in Genevieve. I've just been looking at his filmography in IMDb; I didn't realise just how many very good movies he made - and I believe I've seen every one of them! I don't think he missed out on anything by not getting the part in Guns of Navarone - an awful film IMO.

  19. #99
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    Hi Shirlgirl



    Kenny More did appear in a lot of good pictures and, apparently after the success of "Reach For The Sky" people in the industry were urging him to try his luck in the US of A. Kenny More conquering Hollywood, the more (no pun intended!) I think about it, if he had gone to Hollywood I don't think he would have seen any great success. I think KM was too British & would have ended up as Alan Napier did, i.e. playing butlers, manservants etc for years, just my theory though. Perhaps his intention to be in "The Guns of Navarone" would have given him exposure to US audiences but, John Davis put a stop to that possibility. I obviously don't know the ins & outs about KM & not appearing in "Navarone", but, John Davis was well known for being a 1st rate a....hole at Rank & was widely despised as the boss. As for "Navarone" it was a Boy's Own adventure and I enjoyed it immensely, I was about 12 years old when it was screened at the local Odeon.



    Clive

  20. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by CliveT

    John Davis was well known for being a 1st rate a....hole at Rank & was widely despised as the boss. Clive
    Wasn't the hated Davis parodied in 'Peeping Tom' as Don Jarvis?



    Steve?

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