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  1. #61
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by christoph404
    My understanding of NOTD is that it is a "Horror Film" or a "Supernatural/Occult Thriller" which I think is a more generally acknowledged description of what type of film it is.
    I agree, what pushes the film away from many other Jamesian adaptations is that the monster is seen and actively kills Karswell. For me this pitch's the film into the horror market.

  2. #62
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    I re-watched NOTD last night and it was the first time, probably because of some of the discussions on this thread, that I started actively thinking of 'genre' while watching a film.



    My conclusion while watching the film is that it could be termed 'multi-genre' as it contains elements of horror/withcraft/monsters/supernatural/paranoia/psychology/detection/thriller.



    That's probably why I like it so much .... it features many of the 'genres' I enjoy within one film!



    Bats.

  3. #63
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Im thinking some of the disagreement generated in this often heated debate derives from the term "Ghost Story" in its form as a recognised literary genre, and also with its simple use as a descriptive term....ghost story. Writers such as Mary Shelley, Bram Stoker, Byron, MR James, certainly wrote stories and novels that belong to the literary "Ghost Story" genre, but I think one must be carefull not to then use the generel term ghost story as a simplfied descriptive term as to the content of the story because within that genre of "Ghost Story" the themes and content are often more varied and complex than that. So for example although Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is considered to belong to a genre of writing known as "Gothic Ghost Story" it would be incorrect or incomplete to simply say that "Frankenstein" is a ghost story, because that would be misdescribing what the novel is about.It belongs to a genre known as "Ghost Story" but in descriptive terms of what it is about...well thats a bit different. In the same way that MR James was a renowned writer of the "Ghost Story" genre, it must be remembered that it was a lterary genre that encompassed a wide variety of scenarios and though his "Casting of the ruins" belongs to the Genre I think it is an over simplified description to simply say that it is a ghost story. It would be more accurate to say that "Casting The Ruins" belongs to the popular literary Genre that was fashionable at that time , known as the "Ghost Story" and it concerns the occult and withcraft. Night of the Demon is an adaption of MR James's story, if we are talking about the content of the story it is as already stated, witchcraft and the occult and if we are talking about the Genre of the film it is a Fantasy/ Horror based on the book "Casting The Ruins" which belongs to the literary genre of "Ghost Story". But I would say that describing NOTD as a ghost story (note my lack of itallics, Im using ghost story in its descriptive terms") is not an accurate or correct description of the film. To view a definition of ghost story look at previous posts such as Bats on this thread.

  4. #64
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Watched Night of the Demon Sunday nightand still a bit puzzled by what I thought I heard. When Karswell was leaving he was supposed to be on the train to Northampton, yet I'm sure I heard Peggy Cummins say he'd bought a ticket to Southampton. Did I really hear that or is my mind going?

  5. #65
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    Watched the last half hour:still very creepy,but I think keeping the demon in the confines of imagination would have been better.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  6. #66
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    They cut it for the American market and the one on the other night was the full English version. The American cut is shown more often than the full English version so you must have seen the cut version where the Demon only appears at the end.

  7. #67
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    Ironically, I've just been watching this movie under the US title "CURSE OF THE DEMON" on Turner Movie Classics here in the USA.



    The US version suffers many unforgivable cuts... try to see the UK original: NIGHT OF THE DEMON instead,



    In both versions... note the superb lighting of all the action scenes...small point I know, but the devil is in the details (pun intended!)



    This is one of the things that makes a good movie GREAT!! and why we're still talking about it 50 years (yes, 50 YEARS!!) later.

  8. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by 716Jones
    Watched Night of the Demon Sunday nightand still a bit puzzled by what I thought I heard. When Karswell was leaving he was supposed to be on the train to Northampton, yet I'm sure I heard Peggy Cummins say he'd bought a ticket to Southampton. Did I really hear that or is my mind going?
    I have just watched the last 30 minutes of CURSE OF THE DEMON (USA version of the great movie..)



    She did indeed say "Southampton"!

  9. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carmel
    They cut it for the American market and the one on the other night was the full English version. The American cut is shown more often than the full English version so you must have seen the cut version where the Demon only appears at the end.


    I have both versions on dvd, the American being 82 mins and the British 95 mins.

    The scene with the Demon at the begining of the film is in both the American and British versions.

  10. #70
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    Yes but he caught the Train at Clapham Junction so would have hardly been going to Northampton

  11. #71
    Super Moderator Country: UK christoph404's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Redstar
    Yes but he caught the Train at Clapham Junction so would have hardly been going to Northampton
    He actually caught the train at the fictitious "Clayham Junction" and the real location is Bricket Wood Station, Hertfordshire which is 12 miles from Watford. You may have been able to get a direct train to Northampton from there!.....

    I believe the ticket hall and underground pass is Watford Junction and the platform where the train leaves is Bricket Wood, so even more trains heading north should you wish to travel that direction!!

  12. #72
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    I saw this last year under the original British title with the deleted material restored. It's one of the very best of this genre.



    For me, the most intreresting thing by far was the performance of Dana Andrews. He has always been a favorite actor of mine, but he almost always played detectives or film-noir "cops". He played working-man types in the classic Best Years of Our Lives and had a lead role in the under-rated western The Ox Bow Incident , but I cannot remember seeing him in the role of a professional man.



    Yet, here he is transformed in a British film, and showing a side I had not seen. He is entirely convincing as the skeptical pragmatist who cares more about the truth than about holding to his own beliefs, and he and Peggy Cummins have a real rapport that works well and is a pleasure to watch.



    I was also intrigued by his role as the only American in a British film. There is no special attention given to the issue and it plays no role in the plot, but his manner, speech, walk, timing and way of responding are all uniqely American - and especially an American man of the time. He reminded me of my Dad.



    Altogether an unexpcted pleasure.

  13. #73
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR

    For me, the most intreresting thing by far was the performance of Dana Andrews.



    Yet, here he is transformed in a British film, and showing a side I had not seen. He is entirely convincing as the skeptical pragmatist who cares more about the truth than about holding to his own beliefs, and he and Peggy Cummins have a real rapport that works well and is a pleasure to watch.


    Well said Tim. A lot of people criticise DA in the film but I think he performs really well.

  14. #74
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    Well said Tim. A lot of people criticise DA in the film but I think he performs really well.
    I was very pleasantly surprised, by him and by the film.



    The story is tightly written and directed. The wind storm sequence at the children's party is a genuinely imaginative and stirring scene.

  15. #75
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    I was very pleasantly surprised, by him and by the film.

    The story is tightly written and directed. The wind storm sequence at the children's party is a genuinely imaginative and stirring scene.
    Yes indeed, that sequence, and the one with DA being chased through the woods are my favourite scenes in the film. Genuinely chilling.

  16. #76
    Senior Member Country: United States TimR's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    ...A lot of people criticise DA in the film .............
    Interesting. Do the critics think he was miscast?

  17. #77
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimR
    Interesting. Do the critics think he was miscast?
    He is accused of being 'wooden', 'miscast', 'drunk' and 'a US has-been only in it for US sales'.



    Dana did give a few duff performances but on his day he was pretty good. I watched him earlier today in Boomerang and he was excellent. NOTD is one of his best performances IMHO.

  18. #78
    Senior Member Country: England smiffy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by batman
    Yes indeed, that sequence, and the one with DA being chased through the woods are my favourite scenes in the film. Genuinely chilling.
    I thought Niall Macguiness as Karswell was excellent too .



    I love the way he played with DAs mind in the library, before the chase in the woods.

    I know some people think That the demon would have been better left unseen ,but for me I think It added another dimension when you see it's foul breath emenating from it's mouth,I did believe I could smell It ,

  19. #79
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    Afraid I'm going to be a spoilsport. The scene where Andrews has what is very obviously a stuffed or toy leopard (or similar animal) thrown at him which he then procedes to wrestle is quite simply one of the funniest things I have ever seen. The only comparably funny because wildly incompetent sequence I can think of is the opening scene of Somewhere on Leave. The dialogue is wooden, the acting atrocious, and the editing unbelievably poor. The two characters are having a very serious conversation, but twice you briefly see the pair of them as one of them is speaking and the other is visibly grinning inanely.

  20. #80
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    I'm in the camp that champions the idea that the demon should be seen (and it is, of course).



    I always thought that the squeaking sound as the demon approaches was in reality the sound of the large, heavy film prop being wheeled forward on a dolly on wheels, maybe even on rails. In any event, I for one think the sound enhances the visual effect.



    Can anyone confirm my suspicion about the sound?

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