Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    804
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by will.15 View Post
    ...Ronald Neame ... the staging is dull and so is the photography...
    Yes! 100%!

    The fact that Ronald Neame, who used so many actors in common with David Lean and yet made so many dull, prosaic efforts over decades just proves to my mind that David Lean was the vastly superior talent.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Country: Jordan
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,246
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by will.15 View Post
    I like that sort of thing as long as it doesn't overwhelm the movie, which sometimes happens with Orson Welles and very much the case with Ken Russell. That is my big problem with a lot of 1950s British movies. They are just photographed plays. Especially Ronald Neame movies, which is strange because he started as a cinematographer and does exemplary work for Lean. On his own, the acting is often excellent, but the staging is dull and so is the photography. The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie looks like he did just a bunch of medium and close-up shots with no idea what the finished product would look like then just handed it to the editor to figure out. With Lean and Hitchcock, you can tell they had a visual plan. Even George Cukor has a better sense of camera movement and staging than Neame.
    Totally agree with Welles and Russell, much as I love them both

  3. #23
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    These pages have been scanned from a magnificently illustrated book entitled The British Film Annual 1949, entered into my collection yesterday and which covers, in nearly 200 pages, 53 British films released in 1948, including Anna Karenina; The Red Shoes; The Fallen Idol; The Winslow Boy; Blanche Fury and Oliver Twist, together with many full page colour photos of the stars. I don't know how much this book cost at the time, but it must have been expensive and it was worth every penny.












  4. #24
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    804
    Liked
    0 times
    I ask myself why Henry Stephenson was shipped over from California to play Mr Brownlow.

    He got good billing, fifth in the credits. Was he a box-office drawcard in 1948?

    I'm thinking Albert Bassermann was similarly shipped over to appear in The Red Shoes. I'm so conscious of how some of David Lean's films from hereon were unfortunately compromised by casting inappropriate box-office names.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    Three 8 x 10 publicity stills from Oliver Twist (1948), with John Howard Davies; Francis L. Sullivan and Robert Newton.
    The bottom still shows the filming of the rooftop scene towards the end of the film.






  6. #26
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    Cinema appeal film from 1947.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1ob02N0-tU

  7. #27
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    A nice sunlit 8 x 10 outdoor location still from Oliver Twist, with John Howard Davies; David Lean
    and someone holding a microphone on a long pole, waiting around for the next take to begin.


  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,903
    Liked
    23 times
    Members might like to view a few (so far) of 1940s American items regarding Lean's picture



    http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/boar...ID=7&archive=0

  9. #29
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    A very striking vintage poster there, Rick. The film was originally given an 'A' certificate in 1948 and was neither the first nor the last British film with a child as the central character to be classed as not suitable for children.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    6,020
    Liked
    98 times
    Another 8 x 10 production photo from Oliver Twist, the same scene as in post # 27 above, but taken from a different angle.


Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Similar Threads

  1. Polanski seeks all-Brit cast for Oliver Twist
    By DB7 in forum Latest Cinema Releases
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 13-09-14, 01:51 PM
  2. Further Adventures of Oliver Twist
    By alastairr in forum British Television
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-08-11, 11:26 AM
  3. Twist of Sand (1968)
    By Jean Pierre Borg in forum Looking for a Video/DVD (Film)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 26-08-08, 07:06 AM
  4. Oliver Twist
    By maturin in forum Looking for a Video/DVD (TV)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 29-12-07, 06:37 AM
  5. The Crying Game is best ever movie twist
    By DB7 in forum General Film Chat
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 30-11-07, 08:17 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts