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  1. #21
    Senior Member Country: Europe
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    Interesting to read the different views on this excellent film. I do know quite a bit about the Bentley case and was able to relate to the film regardless of any factual inaccuracies. For me, the power of it lies in its indictment of the justice system at a time when ordinary people had little recourse to the arrogance of the establishment.



    My mum, now in her 70s, says she will never forget the day he died. She was working in Pall Mall and said central London went quiet and people were crying on the street. It was a dark day for everyone and I feel the film expresses that extraordinarily well.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Country: UK Brief Encounter's Avatar
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    Amazing film. I watched it when I acted in the play version for my drama A-level. I played the judge! If you ask me, Peter Medak is a very talented director and it's a shame he hasn't done more. The final moments of LHHI are devastatingly sad.

  3. #23
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gazza
    Interesting to read the different views on this excellent film. I do know quite a bit about the Bentley case and was able to relate to the film regardless of any factual inaccuracies. For me, the power of it lies in its indictment of the justice system at a time when ordinary people had little recourse to the arrogance of the establishment.



    My mum, now in her 70s, says she will never forget the day he died. She was working in Pall Mall and said central London went quiet and people were crying on the street. It was a dark day for everyone and I feel the film expresses that extraordinarily well.
    It was one of the cases that was so obviously wrong that it was a big boost to the calls for an end to capital punishment



    Steve

  4. #24
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hackett
    The closest to the real thing filmed execution scene is in "10 RILLINGTON PLACE" 1971 as Albert Pierrpoint was the technical advisor. Harrowing it maybe but quick and no more than fair justice for our North East friends I would say. Please don't bring up the fact that Timothy Evans was pardoned for the murder of his wife which Christie admitted too. Evans was hung for the murder of his daughter he has never been pardoned for that. Christie even admitted to being a necrophile but would not admit to the murder of baby Geraldine Evans.
    That case isn't over yet. A Home Secretary has recommended a Royal Pardon. At the latest session at the court of appeal in 2004 the judges accepted that Evans did not murder his wife or baby



    Steve

  5. #25
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    As per Tim Spall's film, 'The Last Hangman'. Let us hope we've seen the last of it. Deterrant? It possibly was but murders plan to get away with it. They knew the consquence, they thought they wouldn't be caught.



    '10 Rillington Place', 'Yield to the Night', 'Dance with a Stranger' & 'Let Him Have it', in my opinion they all captured the mood and greyness of the 50s perfectly. A bygone era. An era of the 'system' always knew best and could always be trusted. 'Now be quiet and do as you're told!'



    Say a little prayer that you won't ever be anguished parents, waiting for your clock to click onto 9a.m. in order that the state can make the world safer for everyone else. If Bentley's execution scene is seen as powerful I would suggest that shot of the family huddled together in their lounge tops it.



    Never again, not in my name thank you!

  6. #26
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    Just returning to the actual film for a moment - I saw it at the weekend with my partner and we were both profoundly moved by it. We disagree on the question of capital punishment but were united both in our admiration for the performances and in the excellent job the film made of highlighting this case in particular and the whole notion of 'justice'. Whatever factual inaccuracies there may have been are surely excusable given the demands of the dramatic format and the film remains IMO an excellent, if sadly rather minor, example of a British crime-related film ( likewise Pierrpoint/The Last Hangman which doubtless also took liberties with the truth but remains a fascinating examination of both a remarkable public servant and the flawed system he served so faithfully ). I was particularly impressed with Michael Elphick's performance as a humane prison warder who makes Bentley's final days more bearable. Its only a small part but Elphick does it proud - a fine example of how a talented supporting player can add so much texture to a film.

  7. #27
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    This film was very good. Christopher Eccleston was, as always, his usual brilliant self.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: UK Brief Encounter's Avatar
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    Shame he's disowned it.

  9. #29
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brief Encounter
    Shame he's disowned it.
    Has he? In what way "disowned" it?

    It'd be a shame if he has because he gives a superb performance



    Steve

  10. #30
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    First I've heard of it.

  11. #31
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    I think it comes from this Guardian interview in 2000. But I read it that he was happy with his portrayal...........



    Home truths | | guardian.co.uk Film

  12. #32
    Senior Member Country: Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brief Encounter
    Amazing film. I watched it when I acted in the play version for my drama A-level. I played the judge! If you ask me, Peter Medak is a very talented director and it's a shame he hasn't done more. The final moments of LHHI are devastatingly sad.
    I totally agree with you, Your Honour.

  13. #33
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    It's ironic, and saddening, that Eccleston should've been troubled by the lack of 'truthfulness', as he saw it, in the way he was expected to portray someone with developmental disabilities. Ironic because, despite the factual inaccuracies in the film, it's truthfulness shines through. That is to say, we can now safely say that the phrase 'Let him have it', upon which the entire case came to hinge, was 'borrowed' from a previous case. Also, the dead policeman is now believed to have been shot by another policeman, not Craig.



    Indeed, the only murder in this tale is that of Bentley, by the state. Nonetheless, while the film is not a properly factual account, it is truthful. That is to say, it makes it plain that the police, when they're determined to secure a conviction, can get away with anything.



    Great film.

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