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  1. #61
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Then the close-ups of Torquil, Joan & Kenny in the boat were shot in a boat set on gimbals in the studio with some hefty studio hands rocking it in all different directions at once - and some other studio hands throwing bucket-fulls of water over the very brave Wendy Hiller. Note the clever way that Torquil ducks one wave and Joan gets it full in the face. Well Torquil is a sailor and can read the water better so he know when the waves are coming
    It was while they were filming that scene with the boat on gimbals in the studio, hefty studio hands rocking it in all directions, other studio hands throwing buckets of water, the wind machine going strong, everybody shouting.



    Then David Niven wandered by and asked Powell, "Is this a private fight, or can anyone join in?"



    It was then that Micky decided that David Niven would be perfect for Peter Carter in A Matter of Life and Death.



    [From Micky Powell's autobiography]



    P&P had already done a lot of work on AMOLAD. They wanted to make it a year or two earlier than they did, but they were delayed because all the Technicolor cameras were in use making training films for the American armed forces.



    Because of that enforced delay they thought they had better do something while they waited. They had what I imagine to be a typical Powell & Pressburger conversation:

    Emeric: Let's make a film about a girl who wants to get to an island. But she can't. And when she can, she doesn't want to get there any more.

    Micky: Why does she want to get there?

    Emeric: I don't know. Let's make the film and find out.



    Emeric then went away and wrote the whole story of IKWIG in less than a week! He said it just flowed like no other story he'd ever written.



    They did their usual back and forth a few times with the script to make it as close to perfection as they could. Micky and a few other people helped with the dialogue. Emeric always knew what he wanted the characters to say, he just didn't know the way they'd actually say it.



    Steve

  2. #62
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    What a sad ending for Roger Livesey. I've just read it and was very touched as he was one of my heroes when I was growing up and very much a role model.

  3. #63
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    What a sad ending for Roger Livesey. I've just read it and was very touched as he was one of my heroes when I was growing up and very much a role model.
    Mr. Sexy Voice...I once "saw" Colonel Blimp with both eyes closed all the way. Brilliant experience!

  4. #64
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    What a sad ending for Roger Livesey. I've just read it and was very touched as he was one of my heroes when I was growing up and very much a role model.
    You could do a lot worse than to have Roger as a role model.



    It was a strange and sad end. Roger & Ursula Jeans had been married since 1937. They had no children themselves but were uncle and aunt to the children of their many siblings. They were much loved by everyone that knew them and there was no hint of scandal in their life - so no publisher is interested in a biography about them.



    Roger was diagnosed with cancer of the bowel and given just a few months to live. To avoid some of the swingeing death duties (taxes payable on the estate of the deceased) in force at the time, they decided to transfer all of their assets into Ursula's name. But then Roger's cancer took longer than expected to have its effect and even worse, Ursula developed a cancer and quickly died of it. So Roger was hit with all the taxes and had to live his last few years (he lived another 3 years after Ursula died) in relative poverty with the added expense of his medical bills.



    But he lives on in our memories and our hearts.



    Steve



    Livesey biography - a work in progress

  5. #65
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    Hi Steve. Yes, it is great that he lives on in our hearts and by the marvelous invention of computer discs. I am heartened that so many of these lovely people are still remembered with such affection on this site. They gave, and continue to give us so much and one wishes that it was possible to thank them. All that good feeling for dear old Margaret Rutherford on the "Blithe Spirit" exchange was so nice to read.

  6. #66
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    Just been a 15 min play on Radio 4 about the character Bridie as she waits for the boat to come back from Joan's desperate attempt to reach the island.

  7. #67
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Just been a 15 min play on Radio 4 about the character Bridie as she waits for the boat to come back from Joan's desperate attempt to reach the island.
    It's the short series called Celluloid Extras that is being broadcast as the Woman's Hour drama all this week and repeated at 19:15

    They'll all be available for a week on the web site after their second broadcast each day.



    Steve



    Woman's Hour Drama �€“ Celluloid Extras

    Monday 26 to Friday 30 March

    10.45-11.00am BBC RADIO 4



    Maggie Steed, Selina Cadell, Patricia Kerrigan, Claire Rushbrook and

    Ellie Haddington star in five short plays about the secret world of a

    minor character in a classic film.



    Monday spotlights Miss Prism, or the Dreadful Secret from The

    Importance Of Being Earnest, directed by Anthony Asquith in 1952. The

    writer is Natalia Power. Cecily's tutor, Miss Prism, has a dreadful

    secret and Oscar Wilde is determined to prise it out of her. His

    discovery inspires his famous play. Miss Prism is played by Selina

    Cadell, Oscar Wilde by Sam Dale, Bosie by Anthony Glennon and Cecily

    by Jasmine Callan.



    Taking centre stage on Tuesday is Molly's Story, from Great

    Expectations, directed by David Lean in 1959. The writer is Shelley

    Silas. Molly is housekeeper to Mr Jaggers, the lawyer who has managed

    Pip's inheritance. Jaggers got Molly off a murder charge and she has

    worked for him ever since, but her past is about to catch up with her.

    Molly is played by Claire Rushbrook and Jaggers by John Dougall.



    Wednesday's tale is Catriona's Story, from I Know Where I'm Going,

    directed by Powell and Pressburger in 1945. The writer is Sebastian

    Baczkiewicz. When Joan Webster is stranded on the island of Mull, she

    is persuaded to stay with Catriona Potts, a penniless, dog-loving

    owner of a large house whose husband is away in the War. When Joan

    stubbornly insists upon heading out to sea towards a marriage of

    convenience in the boat of a young local fisherman, listeners are left

    to follow Catriona and local girl Bridie's tense wait as the boat

    heads for a dangerous whirlpool. Catriona is played by Patricia

    Kerrigan, Bridie by Tracy Wiles and Rory by John Dougall.



    Thursday's drama is Sister Philippa's Story, from Black Narcissus,

    directed by Powell and Pressburger in 1947. The writer is Katie Hims.

    When a group of nuns establishes a remote mission in the Himalayas,

    the physical environment produces illness, hysteria and a crisis of

    faith. Sister Philippa is played by Ellie Haddington and Leonard by

    Anthony Glennon.



    Friday showcases Aunt Emma's Story, from The Railway Children,

    directed by Lionel Jeffries in 1970. The writer is Rhiannon Tise. Aunt

    Emma was temporarily drafted in to help bring up her sister's three

    children, Roberta, Peter and Phyllis �€“ the Railway Children. They

    regarded Aunt Emma as a "prickle bush" and she knew it. Then an

    invitation to Roberta's wedding reminds Aunt Emma of her past. Aunt

    Emma is played by Maggie Steed.

  8. #68
    Senior Member Country: United States
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    I'm not familiar with the authors of these radio-plays.



    Am I to understand these are not part of the original film stories, but are modern tales of "What If-?" or "What were those other people doing while the stars were away?"



    Just as I've been insulting creativity, here it seems to be alive and well in Radioland!



    Thanks. I love the 'net.

  9. #69
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    A very good" Hitchcock and Lubitsch" style scene, in IKWIG is when Jean is dreaming in the train, going to be married in Scotland and she imagines the coutry with tartans hills, when the train enter in a very suggestive hill while a voice said something like "you have now cross the border"; it's very freudian and funny !

  10. #70
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    For sure, the best comedy I've seen since many years !...Each time I watch it again, I discover new(funny) statements or understatements( even the "start tittle" is funny, when the name of the two actors stay a little long);it's a very "dense" movie, a tense drama too: when they querell, the whirpool scene, the curse (which is very strong, as anyone knows).



    Thanks to Bertrand Tavernier to" incite" for reading Michael Powell's Memories, that made me discovering -IKWIG- (I tried first to buy it with Britmovie's commercial links but was out of stock, so I bought it in Ta�wan (4euros!). The chinese subtitles are hopefuly optionals; and here Iam....



    And it was done 63years ago !, in condition of war times !....as good ones stay (and improve) over the years ( idem for the awfull ones unfortunately).

    M.

  11. #71
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    3 weeks of uninterompted rain; it's very rare around here...

    That's why, for the moment, I enjoy reweving IKWIG for the 17th time, because when a scot captain saw a gale coming, he said: "Sublime day !"....So, it helps.

    As raining so much, some people say it's the end of the world !

    Sci-Fi movies were right !!.....But if John Huston is Noa, it's O.K for me!

    M.

  12. #72
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    James Mason says in his "memories" that he didn't enjoy the Pandora's set an it's director, Albert Lewin. In part because of having to wear a tuxedo under the beach sun...

    That made me think, about also for reasons of "comfort", he refuses (fortunately) to play the part of T.Mac Neil in IKWIG, and, on the other way, Roger Livesey wanted it most ( and he was so right). Good equation; thanks ever to the strong curse....

    M.

  13. #73
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonfleet
    For sure, the best comedy I've seen since many years !...Each time I watch it again, I discover new(funny) statements or understatements( even the "start tittle" is funny, when the name of the two actors stay a little long);it's a very "dense" movie, a tense drama too: when they querell, the whirpool scene, the curse (which is very strong, as anyone knows).



    Thanks to Bertrand Tavernier to" incite" for reading Michael Powell's Memories, that made me discovering -IKWIG- (I tried first to buy it with Britmovie's commercial links but was out of stock, so I bought it in Ta�wan (4euros!). The chinese subtitles are hopefuly optionals; and here Iam....



    And it was done 63years ago !, in condition of war times !....as good ones stay (and improve) over the years ( idem for the awfull ones unfortunately).

    M.
    There's a better quality version (although a bit more expensive) available at Amazon France. It's part of a set of Powell & Pressburger films released by L'Institut Lumi�re.



    They are all "language friendly" in that the film and all the extras are either in English with French subtitles or in French with English subtitles.



    There are a series of interviews running through all their DVDs with Bertrand Tavernier and with Thelma Schoonmaker (Powell's widow and Scorsese's 3 time Oscar winning editor). Thelma talks about the people involved in the film, Bertrand talks about the film itself and about film-making at the time when it was made.



    They all have other extras as well, each film is produced as a double-DVD, one with the film on it and the other with the extras on it.



    The IKWIG DVD has some "home movies" of Micheal Powell walking the hills of Scotland and Thelma talking about his love of Scotland. It also has an interview with French sailor Roland Jourdain talking (en Fran�ais) about sailing in the Western Isles and the real whirlpool that exists there.



    There is also a 48 page booklet (also en Fran�ais)



    Steve




  14. #74
    Senior Member Country: England
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    I'd very much like to see this.



    Tavernier is a bit of a hero after seeing "These Foolish Things" a bit back.

  15. #75
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rskershaw
    I'd very much like to see this.



    Tavernier is a bit of a hero after seeing "These Foolish Things" a bit back.
    Well they've also done 49th Parallel, Colonel Blimp, A Canterbury Tale, Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes & Peeping Tom in the same series. As I said Bertrand Tavernier and Thelma Shoonmaker do a piece on each DVD (2 DVDs per film) to make a complete series. They make a very nice series all together. Some places sell them singly, some sell them in two boxed sets, one with 4 films, the other with 3.





    Bertrand Tavernier knew and admired Powell & Pressburger. He even gave Powell a small role in Que la f�te commence... (1975) when Powell was all but forgotten by most people. Tavernier interviewed Powell when he was a critric



    See Filmmakers on film: Tavernier on A Matter of Life and Death and Interview de Michael Powell par Tavernier en 1968

    Tavernier wrote some reviews as well. See Blimp, Powell, Pressburger et la po�sie d�guis�e par Bertrand Tavernier





    Bertrand Tavernier's film Daddie Nostalgie (1990) [aka These Foolish Things] was dedicated to Powell (mentioned at the beginning and end)



    Steve

  16. #76
    Senior Member Country: England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    Bertrand Tavernier's film Daddie Nostalgie (1990) [aka These Foolish Things] was dedicated to Powell (mentioned at the beginning and end)

    Steve
    I must watch it again. I saw it the once back on it's original release.

  17. #77
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    Well they've also done 49th Parallel, Colonel Blimp, A Canterbury Tale, Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes & Peeping Tom in the same series. As I said Bertrand Tavernier and Thelma Shoonmaker do a piece on each DVD (2 DVDs per film) to make a complete series. They make a very nice series all together. Some places sell them singly, some sell them in two boxed sets, one with 4 films, the other with 3.





    Bertrand Tavernier knew and admired Powell & Pressburger. He even gave Powell a small role in Que la f�te commence... (1975) when Powell was all but forgotten by most people. Tavernier interviewed Powell when he was a critric



    See Filmmakers on film: Tavernier on A Matter of Life and Death and Interview de Michael Powell par Tavernier en 1968

    Tavernier wrote some reviews as well. See Blimp, Powell, Pressburger et la po�sie d�guis�e par Bertrand Tavernier





    Bertrand Tavernier's film Daddie Nostalgie (1990) [aka These Foolish Things] was dedicated to Powell (mentioned at the beginning and end)



    Steve
    Thanks for the links to Powell/Tavernier interview, en fran�ais en plus !

    I know the french edition by l'Institut Lumi�re, they are beautiful coffrets...

    Yes, about "Que la F�te Commence", B.Tavernier said that M.Powell was shot playing the part off Law, the banker, but the scene was cut off finaly, and there is no more negatives....

    M.

  18. #78
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    It's almost an initiatic story, as Jean and Torquil had "in speed" initiatics tests that got them more and more closer definitly. He seems to "know" as soon as he saw her, and will do anything to get closer, as in the same time, she'll do anything to move away (...with a good reason: she got to be maried !)...

    The "cigarette" scene is just a beautiful love scene.....

    M.

  19. #79
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
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    The first encounter of Joan and Torquil, when she says "But I intend to spend the night on Kiloran !", he replies "Oh !".....is fun because she doesn't know, at this time, that Torquil is also Kiloran.....

    From the begining to the end, this film has not a single boring sequence.

    Moon.

  20. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonfleet
    The first encounter of Joan and Torquil, when she says "But I intend to spend the night on Kiloran !", he replies "Oh !".....is fun because she doesn't know, at this time, that Torquil is also Kiloran.....
    You know, I've seen this film dozens of times, and have never thought of this as being a double entendre as we say in England. I must be more innocent than I thought....

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