Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast
Results 121 to 140 of 192
  1. #121
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Josie52 View Post
    Love it, love it, love it......what a truly delightful film!!

    I didn't know about Roger Livesey's unfortunate end.......how very sad. He was one of my favourite actors.
    It was quite tragic. In 1950, while on tour in the States, Roger was struck down by cancer and almost died. Ursula helped nurse him back to health and to full confidence so that he could carry on working. But he knew the end was in sight. They had spent a lot of their money on the medical bills in America and when they got back to England Roger determined that when he died the government wouldn't get all of what remained in death duties. He wanted Ursula to be left with enough to live on and so they signed everything over to be in Ursula's name.

    But then in 1972 Ursula was struck by a cancer of the bowel and died about 18 months later. So the government did get most of their money (death duties were very high at the time).

    Roger lived for another 3 years in relative poverty, supported mainly by friends. But then his own cancer returned and this time there was no escape from it. He died in 1976, aged 69.


    They had no children and they were a lovely couple without any scandal attached to their name, much loved by everyone. So consequently no publisher is interested in a biography about them. Publishers are only interested in biographies where there is some scandal or hatred involved.

    A group of us are working on a biography which we will publish on the internet. It's a long term project and it will probably be a while before we've finished. It's taken us a while to figure out the Livesey family tree.

    Brothers Joseph and Sam Livesey married the Edwards sisters. Sam married Margaret Ann in 1900 and Joseph married Mary Catherine in 1905. Sam and Margaret Ann had two sons, Jack (1901) and Barrie Livesey (1905). Joseph and Mary Catherine had two children, Roger (1906) and Maggie (1911).

    After Joseph died in 1911 and Margaret Ann died in 1913, Sam married Mary Catherine in 1913*. They then brought up the children as one large family, having another child of their own, Stella in 1915.

    The family tree was further complicated when Roger Livesey married Ursula Jeans whose brother Desmond Jeans was already married to Roger's sister Maggie.



    Steve

    * This was of dubious legality, see Deceased Wife's Sister's Marriage Act 1907 so it's no wonder that they didn't advertise that fact. Thus the assumption in many articles about Roger that his father was Sam Livesey
    Last edited by Steve Crook; 16-12-10 at 12:10 AM.

  2. #122
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,659
    Liked
    144 times
    Thanks for posting those informations about Roger's bio ...
    Last edited by moonfleet; 16-12-10 at 12:29 PM.

  3. #123
    Senior Member Country: England Elaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,814
    Liked
    600 times
    What a sad end to a lovely couple. I love all of Roger livesey's films. He was great in The Drum with Sabu.

  4. #124
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,659
    Liked
    144 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Well they've also done 49th Parallel, Colonel Blimp, A Canterbury Tale, Black Narcissus, The Red Shoes & Peeping Tom in the same series. As I said Bertrand Tavernier and Thelma Shoonmaker do a piece on each DVD (2 DVDs per film) to make a complete series. They make a very nice series all together. Some places sell them singly, some sell them in two boxed sets, one with 4 films, the other with 3.





    Bertrand Tavernier knew and admired Powell & Pressburger. He even gave Powell a small role in Que la f�te commence... (1975) when Powell was all but forgotten by most people. Tavernier interviewed Powell when he was a critric



    See Filmmakers on film: Tavernier on A Matter of Life and Death and Interview de Michael Powell par Tavernier en 1968

    Tavernier wrote some reviews as well. See Blimp, Powell, Pressburger et la po�sie d�guis�e par Bertrand Tavernier





    Bertrand Tavernier's film Daddie Nostalgie (1990) [aka These Foolish Things] was dedicated to Powell (mentioned at the beginning and end)



    Steve
    Hi Steve C.

    When I click on the Tavernier's links it says: Invalid URL
    Do they no longer exist ... or what ??

    mOOn

  5. #125
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by moonfleet View Post
    Hi Steve C.

    When I click on the Tavernier's links it says: Invalid URL
    Do they no longer exist ... or what ??

    mOOn
    It looks like the whole of the powell.ifrance.com site is down

    Bertrand's article is from Positif No 253 (April 1982), if you can find that

    Steve

  6. #126
    Senior Member moonfleet's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    6,659
    Liked
    144 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    It looks like the whole of the powell.ifrance.com site is down

    Bertrand's article is from Positif No 253 (April 1982), if you can find that

    Steve
    I've got some Positif magazines, but not this one ...
    Think I'd ask Mr Tavernier on his blog, maybe those reviews are online elsewhere

    Thanks anyway

  7. #127
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    264
    Liked
    0 times
    my father in law hated that film ?

  8. #128
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by philip hindley View Post
    my father in law hated that film ?
    Any reason why? Or just a general irrational hatred?

    Steve

  9. #129
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    264
    Liked
    0 times
    No he saw it when it came out and he just thought it was very boring, I think he just went to the cinema at the time when there was nothing else on that night. He wasnt a film buff by any means, lets just say it wasnt his type of film. It was one of those things, he used to say "Oh that bloody film, I remember that night we went to see it !" where it reminded him of the period. I always say to the wife when it comes on tv "Your dads films on tonight !" we always laugh about it now, actually I like the film.

  10. #130
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by philip hindley View Post
    No he saw it when it came out and he just thought it was very boring, I think he just went to the cinema at the time when there was nothing else on that night. He wasnt a film buff by any means, lets just say it wasnt his type of film. It was one of those things, he used to say "Oh that bloody film, I remember that night we went to see it !" where it reminded him of the period. I always say to the wife when it comes on tv "Your dads films on tonight !" we always laugh about it now, actually I like the film.
    How old was he in 1945? 12?

    So he didn't actually hate it, he just didn't like it when he first saw it. Has he matured in his tastes since 1945?

    Steve

  11. #131
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    264
    Liked
    0 times
    Oh sorry should have explained more he would have been about 18 in 1945 but he died in 1994, hence why the film always reminds us of him.

  12. #132
    Senior Member Country: United States MonicaMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    362
    Liked
    3 times
    I just finished watching this movie. Goodness... I knew Wendy Hiller's character couldn't be all bad - look at how she warmed to those Irish Wolfhounds and the Cocker spaniels!

    Ducking offline for a bit - going to replay that last scene until I tire of the warmth in Roger Livesey's voice. Glad he didn't do Brief Encounter - I probably would have liked Alec much more. He certainly would have towered over Celia Johnson.

    Valentine Dyall, OTOH is just as peculiar as ever.

  13. #133
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MonicaMC View Post
    I just finished watching this movie. Goodness... I knew Wendy Hiller's character couldn't be all bad - look at how she warmed to those Irish Wolfhounds and the Cocker spaniels!

    Ducking offline for a bit - going to replay that last scene until I tire of the warmth in Roger Livesey's voice. Glad he didn't do Brief Encounter - I probably would have liked Alec much more. He certainly would have towered over Celia Johnson.

    Valentine Dyall, OTOH is just as peculiar as ever.
    Does anyone ever tire of the warmth in Roger's voice?

    Joan wasn't all bad. She had just been badly brought up so that she thought certain things like money and position are more important than they are. She just needed to be shown that her values were wrong

    Steve

  14. #134
    Senior Member Country: United States MonicaMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    362
    Liked
    3 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    Does anyone ever tire of the warmth in Roger's voice?

    Joan wasn't all bad. She had just been badly brought up so that she thought certain things like money and position are more important than they are. She just needed to be shown that her values were wrong
    There's just one thing: I'm going to need to drop by Scarecrow to get the DVD now - that dialect is so thick in places that I practically need subtitles.

    I learned the title song years ago. But that other song, about the maiden -- what the devil is the actual title of that?

    And you're so right about Joan. Both she (and Torquil, for that matter) experience transformation in the film. I think about how skeptical some people are about older films, thinking that all the loose ends are tied up and that it's wrong. But the thing is, in a good, classic story with a strong character arc, the hero goes through the fire, and he learns something important. And I think I'd rather have that than some film that ends because the story's doings are all told out, but there's no real message -- just a feeling of having been manipulated, ravaged, cheated, and finally abandoned while the credits roll.
    Last edited by MonicaMC; 24-02-11 at 10:03 AM.

  15. #135
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MonicaMC View Post
    There's just one thing: I'm going to need to drop by Scarecrow to get the DVD now - that dialect is so thick in places that I practically need subtitles.

    I learned the title song years ago. But that other song, about the maiden -- what the devil is the actual title of that?

    And you're so right about Joan. Very much the heroine's journey. :)
    There aren't any subtitles for when they're speaking Gaelic
    But it's all been translated here

    Did you know that the title song is actually an Irish folk song?


    The song they sing at the Ceildhe, the one sung as a round, puzzled us for some time. Not only is there the accents and the Gaelic phrases in the song but they're all singing different things at different times. But it was finally solved and identified as Macaphee Turn the cattle

    There's other information about The Music in IKWIG

    Steve

  16. #136
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    1,903
    Liked
    23 times
    A further showing of "I Know Where I'm Going" this coming weekend: Sunday 27 Feb on BBC-2 @ 1.00pm

  17. #137
    Senior Member Country: United States MonicaMC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    362
    Liked
    3 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Rick C View Post
    A further showing of "I Know Where I'm Going" this coming weekend: Sunday 27 Feb on BBC-2 @ 1.00pm
    I don't have access to BBC-2, but I do have access to Netflix, and I have a sneaking suspicion that I will be seeing this movie again before the weekend is over. The thing is, I've seen "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp," but Roger Livesey did not make a big impression on me there. But at the time I had a myopic focus on Deborah Kerr - as did Michael Powell, from what I've read.

    Good grief - first Cyril Raymond, now Roger Livesey. I'm too old and of the wrong era to be a bobbysoxer. *eyeroll*

  18. #138
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2002
    Posts
    29,732
    Liked
    418 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MonicaMC View Post
    I don't have access to BBC-2, but I do have access to Netflix, and I have a sneaking suspicion that I will be seeing this movie again before the weekend is over. The thing is, I've seen "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp," but Roger Livesey did not make a big impression on me there. But at the time I had a myopic focus on Deborah Kerr - as did Michael Powell, from what I've read.

    Good grief - first Cyril Raymond, now Roger Livesey. I'm too old and of the wrong era to be a bobbysoxer. *eyeroll*
    Roger was very good in A Matter of Life and Death (1946) [aka Stairway to Heaven] as well.
    He did a few other films but never got any other major roles on film like he did with Powell & Pressburger. He was mainly a stage actor.

    He's the nominal hero in Blimp but as you say, it's Deborah (& Anton) who tend to be more memorable. Clive Candy is just an all round good guy although a bit of an innocent bumbler. It's Edith/Barbara/Johnny and Theo who are really more heroic

    Steve

  19. #139
    Senior Member Country: England Elaine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    1,814
    Liked
    600 times
    Quote Originally Posted by MonicaMC View Post
    I don't have access to BBC-2, but I do have access to Netflix, and I have a sneaking suspicion that I will be seeing this movie again before the weekend is over. The thing is, I've seen "The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp," but Roger Livesey did not make a big impression on me there. But at the time I had a myopic focus on Deborah Kerr - as did Michael Powell, from what I've read.

    Good grief - first Cyril Raymond, now Roger Livesey. I'm too old and of the wrong era to be a bobbysoxer. *eyeroll*
    If I remember[ correct me if I am wrong more knowledgable members] Michael Powell in his autobiography, hints at an affair with Deborah Kerr.
    So he must have had some nice feelings about her, if only lust.

  20. #140
    Super Moderator Country: Great Britain
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    3,771
    Liked
    86 times
    It's worth looking out for Roger in The League of Gentlemen, as he does a splendid seedy character. And there's the bonus of another picture of Deborah in it as well!

    The League of Gentlemen (1960) - IMDb

    Nick

Page 7 of 10 FirstFirst ... 56789 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Great day 1945
    By howard 65 in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 21-12-13, 08:28 PM
  2. I Know Where I'm Going! (1945)
    By DB7 in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 19-08-11, 10:19 PM
  3. A Place of One's Own 1945
    By Masonite678 in forum Your Favourite British Films
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-09-09, 10:35 PM
  4. And Then There Were None (1945)
    By kezzy in forum Film Locations
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-03-08, 04:07 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts