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  1. #281
    Senior Member Country: Scotland julian_craster's Avatar
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    Here is the BFI List...:
    http://www.reelclassics.com/Articles...te-article.htm


    Spring in Park Lane (position 5) was just surpassed by Star Wars, but that was entirely US financed...

    The highest Powell and Pessburger film was at position 63 ....
    Last edited by julian_craster; 04-11-14 at 01:48 PM.

  2. #282
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by julian_craster View Post
    t turned out that TRS was the biggest money earner of all British films until the more recent blockbusters like the Bond or Harry Potter films


    Perhaps for the Rank Organisation, but not overall....

    Spring in Park Lane (also released in 1948, but by British Lion) is (to date) the most profitable British film of all time according to the Ultimate Film BFI book ......

    It did exceptionally well at the box office and cost about one tenth the budget of TRS to make...!
    Is that just by the UK figures? What does it say about TRS?

    As TRS wasn't promoted much by Rank it didn't do muck at the UK box office.

    The ranking of TRS is the worldwide receipts

    Steve

  3. #283
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    ABC Film Review, March, 1955, double-page spread.




  4. #284
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    ABC Film Review, March, 1955, double-page spread.
    Ah, 1955. Yes, their main run of films together had given us one major feature film each year from 1939 - 1951. They needed a bit of a break.
    Powell went off and did a bit of theatre work like directing James Forsyth's "Heloise" at the Golders Green Theatre in 1951 and Raymond Massey's "Hanging Judge" at the New Theatre, London in 1952.

    They got back together for the film mentioned here, their version of the operetta "Die Fledermaus", filmed as Oh... Rosalinda!! (1955)
    That was then followed by The Battle of the River Plate (1956) and Ill Met by Moonlight (1957)
    After those they decided to end the partnership and went off to do various solo projects, but they remained great friends

    Oh... Rosalinda!! is an interesting film what with being filmed in 'scope and having quite a few light comedic touches and the clever twist of setting it in post-war Vienna with "The Bat" trading between the occupying powers and causing all sorts of problems for them. Anton Walbrook dances in it! But most people think that the last number goes on for too long

    Steve

  5. #285
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Someone ought to digitise all these old film magazine articles one of these days, Steve, and put them online, as there is a wealth of information in them. I must get around to seeing Oh...Rosalinda!!! one of these days as it will be interesting to see how P & P adapted to the then comparatively new system of CinemaScope. A lot of the traditional directors, such as Carol Reed and Alexander Mackendrick, who were used to making their films in 4 x 3 format found it difficult to compose for such a wide image, but they managed to adapt to it as everyone had to eventually.

  6. #286
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    They used different formats like 'scope quite effectively. Especially in the scene where they had 3 people singing different parts of a song in 3 different rooms along a hotel balcony. But 'scope doesn't have much depth of field so everything looks a bit flat, in a single plane

    Steve

  7. #287
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    ...After those they decided to end the partnership and went off to do various solo projects, but they remained great friends...
    I've read Powell's memoir and the Pressburger biography but I feel neither gives a convincing explanation of that decision.

  8. #288
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    I've read Powell's memoir and the Pressburger biography but I feel neither gives a convincing explanation of that decision.
    They had done everything that they wanted to do together and they both had solo projects that they wanted to pursue. There were some disagreements on their later films but that was nothing new. There were disagreements and disputes on all of their films. That's how they worked together, in an atmosphere of healthy debate.

    But In the early days there was more understanding of what the other was thinking. During their later films there were more unresolved disagreements. They were drifting apart.

    But to the end of their lives they remained great friends, both having a huge admiration for the other's abilities.

    Steve

  9. #289
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^
    I'm sorry.

  10. #290
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    ^
    I'm sorry.
    What for?

    You thought that there wasn't a clear reason given in Powell's autobiography or in Pressburger's biography. It is in there but it's a bit buried. I also have the advantage of various other sources of information

    Steve

  11. #291
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^
    Well, I'm primarily sorry that the two great craftsmen who originated such wondrous, inventive works during the 40s would seem so lost throughout the 50s. They seemed to wander from one extreme to the other, from second-hand militaria to second-hand (and audience-repelling) operetta.

    And I guess I'm secondarily sorry that the biography and the memoir didn't communicate the reasons for their drifting apart to a reader like me. I knew a great fabulist like Powell wouldn't mention anything mundane like money or the Eady Plan. I did guess at Pressburger's homesickness and illness.

  12. #292
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    ^
    Well, I'm primarily sorry that the two great craftsmen who originated such wondrous, inventive works during the 40s would seem so lost throughout the 50s. They seemed to wander from one extreme to the other, from second-hand militaria to second-hand (and audience-repelling) operetta.
    Things had changed in the industry. Throughout the 1940s they had been sponsored by Rank in a very hands-off way. Rank just provided the money and let them get on with it. As long as the films made a profit, and they all did, Rank was happy. Even the less popular (at the time) films like A Canterbury Tale made a profit and more than made back their costs at the box office.

    Scorsese described this arrangement as "... experimental film-makers working inside a totally commercial system."

    But then Rank started to run out of money, what with the over-runs from films like Gabby Pascal's Caesar and Cleopatra (1945) and a failed distribution deal in the States which was scuppered by the Eady Levy. So the accountants took over at Rank, mainly in the form of John Davies. He had no artistic sensibilities and so didn't understand what P&P were doing. When they showed The Red Shoes to the Rank executives - they walked out without a word, convinced that they had lost their money. So they didn't give it a premi�re but just put it out on the circuit without much publicity. P&P were made to take a much smaller cash payment and to take a percentage of the profits instead - luckily for them, it went on to be the biggest grossing British film (based on worldwide receipts) for decades.

    So P&P left Rank and went to Korda. Korda didn't give them as much freedom as Rank had done and was more liable to force them to make films that Korda had already signed deals for. That's how come they made Gone to Earth (co-production with Selznick) and The Elusive Pimpernel (co-production with Sam Goldwyn).

    They went to Associated British for Oh... Rosalinda!! but that was a much cheaper production than The Red Shoes or even than The Tales of Hoffmann.

    They finally went back to Rank to make The Battle of the River Plate and Ill Met by Moonlight but by then they were struggling and were drifting apart

    Steve

  13. #293
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook View Post
    He wanted to start a new career as an author. He wrote "Killing a Mouse on Sunday" in 1961, that was turned into a film Behold a Pale Horse (1964) ...
    This advertisement is from Films and Filming, I assume, from the time of the film's release�


  14. #294
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    This advertisement is from Films and Filming, I assume, from the time of the film's release—

    It was based on Pressburger's novel (and stuck fairly closely to it) but Powell and/or Pressburger had nothing to do with the making of the film

    Steve

  15. #295
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    I enjoyed the second volume of Powell�s memoirs as much as the first� even though it does cover the lesser part of his career.

    It has some tiny errors in place names (Georges River on page 440 and the Riverina Express on 445). More unfortunate is the misnaming of the �lovely young girl� who appeared in his second last major film. Jeanie Drynan is given the surname �Diamond� on pages 471 and 611 and �Dryman� on page 591. (And the IMDB has created a listing for the phantom �Jeannie Diamond�.)

    Twenty-eight years after she appeared in They're a Weird Mob she appeared in the more successful (IMHO) Australian comedy Muriel's Wedding.


  16. #296
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    More unfortunate is the misnaming of the “lovely young girl” who appeared in his second last major film. Jeanie Drynan is given the surname ‘Diamond’ on pages 471 and 611 and ‘Dryman’ on page 591. (And the IMDB has created a listing for the phantom ‘Jeannie Diamond’.)
    The IMDb lists Jeanie Drynan as playing "Betty" and Jeannie Diamond as playing "Jeannie (uncredited)". Are they really two different people?
    If they are the same person then they should be merged on the IMDb

    Steve

  17. #297
    Senior Member Country: Australia IlllIIllllIIii's Avatar
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    ^
    Jeanie Drynan played "Betty" in the film.

    Unfortunately Powell's memoir misnames the actress as 'Jeannie Diamond' and misnames her character as "Jeannie".

    There is NO Jeannie Diamond at all (the IMDb have created this phantom from the memoir's error).

    I have written to IMDb once but I've seen no response.
    Last edited by IlllIIllllIIii; 28-05-15 at 07:49 AM.

  18. #298
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by IlllIIllllIIii View Post
    I have written to IMDb once but I've seen no response.
    Don't just write to them, make a submission to correct it.
    They respond better to a merge request than a deletion

    Steve

  19. #299
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I notices that Sebastian (1968), with Dirk Bogarde and Susannah York, is on You Tube. I watched the first 15m of it (not really intending to watch any but getting hooked). It struck me as the type of film that would have been despised when first made but now is just, well, 'groovy' and just so Swinging Sixties. Shame there is no DVD release.

    Sebastian was the film originally pitched by Leo Marks to Michael Powell before they were 'forced' to make Peeping Tom. Powell has co-producer credit and I assume was instrumental in getting it off the ground but Marks has only the story credit as his original script was re-written. I wondered how much of Marks' 1959 script (or treatment) was left in the finished film.

    Any ideas Steve Cook?

  20. #300
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by m35541 View Post
    I notices that Sebastian (1968), with Dirk Bogarde and Susannah York, is on You Tube. I watched the first 15m of it (not really intending to watch any but getting hooked). It struck me as the type of film that would have been despised when first made but now is just, well, 'groovy' and just so Swinging Sixties. Shame there is no DVD release.

    Sebastian was the film originally pitched by Leo Marks to Michael Powell before they were 'forced' to make Peeping Tom. Powell has co-producer credit and I assume was instrumental in getting it off the ground but Marks has only the story credit as his original script was re-written. I wondered how much of Marks' 1959 script (or treatment) was left in the finished film.

    Any ideas Steve Cook?
    'forced' to make Peeping Tom?

    Why should it be the type of film that would have been despised when first made? Who despised it?

    I don't know how much of Leo's original treatment remains in the film but I would imagine quite a lot of it. It is mainly telling a version of Leo's own story

    Steve

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