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  1. #21
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    YOU COULD BE RIGHT ALBABSON! NOT LONG AGO I BOUGHT A BOXED SET OF RVW SYMPHONIES 1 - 9! DECCA, "THE BRITISH MUSIC COLLECTION" . A COUPLE OF THE SYMPHONIES DON'T REMIND ME OF ANYTHING AT ALL, IN FACT I CAN'T HONESTLY SAY THAT I LIKE THEM!



    BUT DEFINITELY, SOME OF HIS MUSIC REMINDS OF BRIT WAR FILMS. ALTHOUGH HIS 'PASTORAL SYMPH' WAS WRITTEN WITH WWI FRANCE IN MIND!!



    CHANGE OF TUNE - JUST WATCHED 'THE SPY IN BLACK' - VAL HOBSON (COR) AND CONRAD VIEGHT (VEIGHT?). ALL GOOD OLD STIFF UPPER LIP STUFF! AH! THEY DON''T MAKE 'EM LIKE THAT ANYMORE.



    GOING TO WATCH 'THE CURSE OF THE DEMON' TONIGHT, WITH A GLASS OF THE FALLING DOWN WATER, (OR TWO)!

  2. #22
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    [snip]



    CHANGE OF TUNE - JUST WATCHED 'THE SPY IN BLACK' - VAL HOBSON (COR) AND CONRAD VIEGHT (VEIGHT?). ALL GOOD OLD STIFF UPPER LIP STUFF! AH! THEY DON''T MAKE 'EM LIKE THAT ANYMORE.
    Follow it up with Contraband (1940). Also with Val Hobson (Cor indeed) and Conrad Veight although in Contraband, Conrad is a goodie.



    The Spy in Black was the first collaboration between Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger who went on to make a few fairly decent films over the next few decades.



    Their film Forty-Ninth Parallel (1941) was RVW's first introduction to composing music for films.



    Steve

  3. #23
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    YOU COULD BE RIGHT ALBABSON! NOT LONG AGO I BOUGHT A BOXED SET OF RVW SYMPHONIES 1 - 9! DECCA, "THE BRITISH MUSIC COLLECTION" . A COUPLE OF THE SYMPHONIES DON'T REMIND ME OF ANYTHING AT ALL, IN FACT I CAN'T HONESTLY SAY THAT I LIKE THEM!

    BUT DEFINITELY, SOME OF HIS MUSIC REMINDS OF BRIT WAR FILMS. ALTHOUGH HIS 'PASTORAL SYMPH' WAS WRITTEN WITH WWI FRANCE IN MIND!!

    CHANGE OF TUNE - JUST WATCHED 'THE SPY IN BLACK' - VAL HOBSON (COR) AND CONRAD VIEGHT (VEIGHT?). ALL GOOD OLD STIFF UPPER LIP STUFF! AH! THEY DON''T MAKE 'EM LIKE THAT ANYMORE.

    GOING TO WATCH 'THE CURSE OF THE DEMON' TONIGHT, WITH A GLASS OF THE FALLING DOWN WATER, (OR TWO)!
    Do you mean "Night of the Demon", Jim? If so, I'm beginning to think you might well be a twin I never knew I had as I watched that only a few days ago! Like "The Spy in Black" (which I also watched) you could well say, "They don't make 'em like that anymore!"

  4. #24
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    I'd better reply to one in upper and lower case and not in caps, as I read somewhere on this webby that it ain't right! Sorry!



    Well albabson, you never know who you are related to sometimes! Anyway I think our more knowledgeable colleagues will say that 'Curse of the Demon' and 'Night of the Demon' are one and the same - just changed titles for the U.S. market.



    I sometimes wonder if we are not quite normal, us lot lot on Britmovie! The rest of Britain is watching 'normal' TV and we are watching films from yonks ago! No! we're normal, it's the rest that are not normal, but what is 'normal'? I'll stop now, before I dig myself in too deep.



    I noticed 'Foggy Dewhurst' in the NOTD/COTD (Brian Wilde), just before he went out of the window; what became of him? He suddenly dropped out 'Last of the Summer Wine'. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/tongue.gif[/img]

  5. #25
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I'd better reply to one in upper and lower case and not in caps, as I read somewhere on this webby that it ain't right! Sorry!
    It's just that ALL CAPS are better reserved to add emphasis, it's like you're shouting all the time :)


    Steve

  6. #26
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    I believe Brian Wilde is still alive. He left the series to look after his sick wife.

    If he is still with us,he will be eighty this year.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  7. #27
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    I'd better reply to one in upper and lower case and not in caps, as I read somewhere on this webby that it ain't right! Sorry!

    Well albabson, you never know who you are related to sometimes! Anyway I think our more knowledgeable colleagues will say that 'Curse of the Demon' and 'Night of the Demon' are one and the same - just changed titles for the U.S. market.

    I sometimes wonder if we are not quite normal, us lot lot on Britmovie! The rest of Britain is watching 'normal' TV and we are watching films from yonks ago! No! we're normal, it's the rest that are not normal, but what is 'normal'? I'll stop now, before I dig myself in too deep.



    I noticed 'Foggy Dewhurst' in the NOTD/COTD (Brian Wilde), just before he went out of the window; what became of him? He suddenly dropped out 'Last of the Summer Wine'.
    Blimey, that makes three titles for the same film then, as I believe it's also known as "Casting the Runes". It's a damn good film whatever it's called.

    Personally, I watch old films rather than modern ones because I like a plot that I can follow, intelligible dialogue (rather than badly recorded mumbling) and a script that isn't peppered with obscenities in every line. Call me old-fashioned!

  8. #28
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    [snip]

    Blimey, that makes three titles for the same film then, as I believe it's also known as "Casting the Runes". It's a damn good film whatever it's called.
    Casting the Runes seems to be a TV version based on the same M.R. James story.



    The 1957 film was originally called Night of the Demon. It was recut for release in America and called Curse of the Demon although the version on US TV and available on video & DVD there is now usually the original British version.



    The film was based on the M.R. James story "Casting the Runes" and in 1968 that title was used for a version made for ITV.



    Steve

  9. #29
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    [snip]

    Personally, I watch old films rather than modern ones because I like a plot that I can follow, intelligible dialogue (rather than badly recorded mumbling) and a script that isn't peppered with obscenities in every line. Call me old-fashioned!
    You're not alone there AlBabson.



    I prefer the older films because they more usually had a real story. They also had properly developed characters that you could take an interest in.



    Nowadays they usually have The Hero, The Villain and The Hero's girlfriend as the only characters that are even partially developed. The rest are just cardborad cut-outs to be shot or blown up.



    They put in all the fancy CGI effects in the hope that we won't notice that there isn't a decent story or any decent characters - but I notice!



    It's not an absolute in either direction though. There were some rubbish films made in the old days and a few good ones sneak through nowadays - despite the best intentions of the accountants and other people in charge in Hollywoodland.



    Steve

  10. #30
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    It's not an absolute in either direction though. There were some rubbish films made in the old days and a few good ones sneak through nowadays - despite the best intentions of the accountants and other people in charge in Hollywoodland.

    Steve
    What I notice, though, in even the most rubbishy of the old "B" movies (except, of course, where a print has deteriorated badly) is that every word of dialogue is perfectly audible. I find that I am unable to follow many of today's films completely(not that I bother very often!) because the actors are often inarticulate, the dialogue has not been recorded clearly or it's down to a combination of the two.Does this bother others?

  11. #31
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    If any of todays 'actors' did go to RADA or any other acting school, then it must be their policy for actors to be 'natural' - therefore mummbling!!



    My niece wants to go into 'show-business' and there are times when I can't understand what SHE says most times! So she should do well



    I must say that the Anglo-Saxon is always chrystal clear! :mad:

  12. #32
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    [snip]

    What I notice, though, in even the most rubbishy of the old "B" movies (except, of course, where a print has deteriorated badly) is that every word of dialogue is perfectly audible. I find that I am unable to follow many of today's films completely(not that I bother very often!) because the actors are often inarticulate, the dialogue has not been recorded clearly or it's down to a combination of the two.Does this bother others?
    But what about those accents and those strained vowels?



    It's not too bad for us southerners but can anyone else in the country understand people like Celia Johnson in Brief Encounter? And her accent isn't the worse by a long way.



    I like to hear a bit of regional variation and a few accents.



    Steve

  13. #33
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    [snip]

    What I notice, though, in even the most rubbishy of the old "B" movies (except, of course, where a print has deteriorated badly) is that every word of dialogue is perfectly audible. I find that I am unable to follow many of today's films completely(not that I bother very often!) because the actors are often inarticulate, the dialogue has not been recorded clearly or it's down to a combination of the two.Does this bother others?
    But what about those accents and those strained vowels?



    It's not too bad for us southerners but can anyone else in the country understand people like Celia Johnson in Brief Encounter? And her accent isn't the worse by a long way.



    I like to hear a bit of regional variation and a few accents.



    Steve
    Being an "Eastender" I certainly have never talked about "Getting merrid in church" or "Being on taim for an appointment" but I can, nevertheless, understand the meaning perfectly when I hear such lines in an old film. I'm in no doubt, either, about what's being said in a Frank Randle or George Formby film; these actors, as did all of their generation (presumably because they received their grounding in theatres where they couldn't rely on microphones) articulated their lines perfectly clearly in spite of their regional accents and, in Randle's case, lack of teeth!

  14. #34
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    Clear pronunciation is always appreciated. thumbs_u

  15. #35
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    TALKING OF REGIONAL ACCENTS - (AND I LIKE TO HEAR ALL OF THEM; WITH THE EXCEPTION OF MY OWN MIDLANDS ACCENT), I REMEMBER SOME MUFFIN OF A POLITICIAN WANTED TO ERRADICATE ALL REGIONAL ACCENTS! CAN YOU IMAGINE SUCH ARROGANCE?



    BY THE WAY, JOHN MILLS ON TODAY, CHANNEL4, 1.00 PM "THE OCTOBER MAN".

  16. #36
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    I am now listening to Ralph Vaughn Williams' Fantasia based on a theme by Thomas Tallis after a day walking twelve miles over farm lands,taking the wrong turns,following marked paths which went nowhere,limbo dancing under a barbed fence which had been illegally put across a field. Ah bliss - now going out a for a few pints of Carling Extra Cold:�‚£1.10 a pint!



    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  17. #37
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    I am now listening to Ralph Vaughn Williams' Fantasia based on a theme by Thomas Tallis after a day walking twelve miles over farm lands,taking the wrong turns,following marked paths which went nowhere,limbo dancing under a barbed fence which had been illegally put across a field. Ah bliss - now going out a for a few pints of Carling Extra Cold:�‚£1.10 a pint!



    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    A walk like that deserves better than a lager. Educate your palate towards a lovely drop of good British ale thumbs_u



    Steve

  18. #38
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    I am in the licensed trade - have been for twenty five years and I have got certificates for real ale (Younger's No 3). So I am well familiar with the juice. I used to like Tetley's Imperial,but over the last couple of years my palate favours the taste of lager.

    Where I wnet last night,it is only 97p for a pint of Tetley's,John Smith's Magnet,80 shilling and 87p for Mansfield.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B thumbs_u

  19. #39
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    I am now listening to Ralph Vaughn Williams' Fantasia based on a theme by Thomas Tallis after a day walking twelve miles over farm lands,taking the wrong turns,following marked paths which went nowhere,limbo dancing under a barbed fence which had been illegally put across a field. Ah bliss - now going out a for a few pints of Carling Extra Cold:�‚£1.10 a pint!



    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    AH! BLISS MARKYB, BLISS! Whoops! Sorry. There I go again - in caps - Ah! bliss Markyb, bliss!



    I think I'm going to move up north at those prices!!!!!

  20. #40
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    You'll always be welcome,Jim

    Ta Ta

    Marky B thumbs_u

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