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Thread: Frenzy

  1. #21
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    DB7:

    Bygraves turned down Jon Finch's role.
    Are you sure? I really can't see that casting working (especially as Michael Caine was first choice for the Foster part) and there would be literally hundreds of British actors better suited to the role.



    If true that would have made for a very odd viewing experience had he acepted...

  2. #22
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    I think that Anna Massey looks incredibly beautiful in this film, without even trying to. Does anyone else agree?

  3. #23
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    There is a lot of use of body doubles for Anna Masseys role.

  4. #24
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    I was thinking more of her lovely face and her slim figure. Her character also seems such a wonderfully kind person. The first time I saw her in it I fell in love with her at once.

  5. #25
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    I thought the scenes with Alec McGowen and Vivien Merchant were priceless - they really added the right amount of black humour to the whole film

  6. #26
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    Originally posted by smudge@Sep 21 2004, 07:44 PM

    Frenzy is a cracking movie, even that late in Hitch's career. Some of the more 'sensitive' critics gave it a battering though - it was called 'sordid' more than once.



    Myself, as soon as I sit down with it I am hooked - I think the basic tensions still work, even after seeing it so many times. The potato van scene with Foster still gets you up towards the edge of the seat...



    Finch, Foster and Cribbins are excellent in it, and we were well and truly robbed with the early death of Barry - he never seemed to look his age.



    Another favourite bit is that wonderfull sweeping titles shot and music :)



    SMUDGE
    I have only seen Frenzy twice and I think it's the best Hitchcock, I must get a copy. Mainly because of the modern English setting and cast, and Barry Foster was one of my favourite actors. The tension in the film really grips you!



    Barry Foster's film and TV credits go way back to the 50s. He played a very good part in a Morse episode "The Last Enemy", and I remember thinking at the time that if John Thaw wasn't Morse then Barry Foster could have comfortably slotted into the role. He died just ten days before John Thaw!



    He was also memorable in The Sweeney feature film from 1977 as the greasy manipulative Elliot McQueen! I never saw Van Der Valk at all, I went out more back then, but hopefully it will be repeated!

  7. #27
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    Barry Foster was quite good in The Sweeney, although his American accent was very dubious

  8. #28
    Senior Member Country: England aaron's Avatar
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    Slightly off topic i know, but surely Bernard Cribbens should be knighted by now....for services to entertainment generaly. 'Right said Fred' alone is deserved of a CBE.

  9. #29
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    Originally posted by aaron@May 15 2005, 02:11 PM

    Slightly off topic i know, but surely Bernard Cribbens should be knighted by now....for services to entertainment generaly. 'Right said Fred' alone is deserved of a CBE.
    Add to that the part of Lennie the Dip in "TWO WAY STRETCH" 1960.

    'Open up Lennie?' 'No the coat!' 'Touch of the Terry-Thomas'.

  10. #30
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    Originally posted by jacobean@May 11 2005, 07:47 AM

    I thought the scenes with Alec McGowen and Vivien Merchant were priceless - they really added the right amount of black humour to the whole film.
    Yes,I loved her attempts at fancy cooking and poor Alec McGowen just wanted it good basic gub.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  11. #31
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    Originally posted by aaron@May 15 2005, 02:11 PM

    Slightly off topic i know, but surely Bernard Cribbens should be knighted by now....for services to entertainment generaly. 'Right said Fred' alone is deserved of a CBE
    Agreed,he is a national treasure and he should be recognised for his contribution to British films,television and radio.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  12. #32
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    Photo of the Nell Of Old London pub. While i was in London i tried to find the location of Ambrose Chapel from Man Who Knew To Much but got the wrong one!! oh well




  13. #33
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    (Marky B @ Mar 30 2004, 07:27 PM)

    Although I have just voted for 39 Steps as the best British Hitchcock film,if I had the chance to vote for a second favourite I would gone for Frenzy.

    Now I am going to say something which might cause fisticuffs on this site eek! ,but I believe,now wait for it,I believe,erm,I really do believe,oh heck I am going to be up for heresy for this,I really believe...Psycho is one of the most overrated,boring and unscary movies ever made. Frenzy was far better and far unappreciated.

    Psycho fans in the red corner,Frenzy fans in the blue corner...

    Let's go...

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    Frenzy is excellent, a very under-rated Hitchcock at the time. It was just very British, and Barry Foster was terrific. I didn't like Psycho at all, the title promised much and delivered something quite a bit less, and I've fallen asleep each time it's been on the box (which admittedly doesn't take much these days)!

  14. #34
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    (samkydd @ Feb 1 2006, 07:09 PM)

    Frenzy is excellent, a very under-rated Hitchcock at the time. It was just very British, and Barry Foster was terrific. I didn't like Psycho at all, the title promised much and delivered something quite a bit less, and I've fallen asleep each time it's been on the box (which admittedly doesn't take much these days)!
    Yes, critics of the time called it a sordid little film. It is, however, strong on plot and suspense, and has some very good central performances. Personally, I have never given FAMILY PLOT the time of day and would much rather mark FRENZY as the perfect coda to Hitch's distinguished career ; contemporary, yet as suspenseful as ever.



    I have to agree with the earlier poster, that the potato lorry scene is finger-crackingly effective !



    SMUDGE

  15. #35
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    Thought the dinner scenes between the inspector and his wife were classic in Frenzy!

  16. #36
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    (jacobean @ Feb 5 2006, 06:29 PM)

    Thought the dinner scenes between the inspector and his wife were classic in Frenzy!
    Hi there.



    Frenzy was actually cut by the BBFC for a while I believe (although I now think it's been restored for DVD), the scene with Barry Foster grapically strangling a woman apparently causing James Ferman some concern.



    There are some good bits in even the weakest Hitchcock movie but his later works on a technical level were sometimes just above TV movie level. This is particularly true of Frenzy and especially Family Plot. Frenzy features some really ugly telephoto lens zooms, not quite Jess Franco but still inept, and overall the thing looks very televisual. Family is even closer to the pilot of a TV series. Although it features a really good crane shot near the beginning overall it's very flat and visually uninteresting. Surprsingly Hitchcock used a TV crew on Psycho and got away with - I still think it's a remarkable piece of work and a very important movie.



    I read somewhere that Topaz actually had something like 3 alternative endings, all of which were used in various territories. Austrian star Frederick Stafford used to play James Bond clones in Eurospy flicks including a couple of entries in the OSS 117 series which ITV used to show very late night back in the 90s. Again this is a very flat piece of work, even with the presence of Jack Hildyard as a cinematographer.



    I was thinking of covering The Lodger for my website. My copy was taken of FilmFOur and is rather a good copy with tinting, etc. The thing that struck me about the film was how modern eveything is for period piece. Anyone caught this recently?



    Cheers.



    Iain

  17. #37
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    (Marky B @ Mar 30 2004, 07:27 PM)

    Although I have just voted for 39 Steps as the best British Hitchcock film,if I had the chance to vote for a second favourite I would gone for Frenzy.....Frenzy was far better and far unappreciated.

    ...

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    There's a long but fascinating review of "Frenzy" with part one of 13 focusing on setting and Hitch's use of aerial views, maps, The Thames, etc. in the film. But if you have time, read the entire review.



    www.fringedigital.com/flicker/frenzy/



    Barbara

  18. #38
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    (Iain1962 @ Feb 5 2006, 07:45 PM)

    Hi there.



    I was thinking of covering The Lodger for my website. My copy was taken of FilmFOur and is rather a good copy with tinting, etc. The thing that struck me about the film was how modern eveything is for period piece. Anyone caught this recently?



    Cheers.



    Iain
    It would be nice to see British silent films getting some extra profile, so go for it. Even if it is Hitchcock again, and he does get the lion's share of coverage. However; despite it's melodramatic subject, it does now appear to us as ahead of its time in a couple of ways. Firstly, Hitch was deeply influenced by a sojourn in Germany, and The Lodger does have many elements of German Expressionist filmmaking; as the film noirs of the forties and fifties were similarly influenced, in some ways it seems noirish to our eyes. However, bear in mind that this is far from unusual in British films of the late 20's...Asquith was similarly influenced, so his films combine expressionism as well as russian montage effects too. Also check out E.A.Dupont's Piccadilly, available on DVD from the bfi - a German director working here in '29, essentially making a London-set film noir.

    The other pre-echo I get from The Lodger is the number of elements that would reappear throughout Hitch's films over the years....the apparent obsession with blondes, the innocent man persecuted, the fairly bloodless protagonist and the use of visual effects to convey point-of-view, in fact it could be seen as a prototype for his career.

    Try and get hold of The Ring (Excellent boxing drama), the silent version of Blackmail (available as an extra on the German DVD label Arthaus, and quite different from the sound version); I don't think The Pleasure Garden is available, The Farmers Wife is, but I don't rate it personally; and I've never seen The Manxman, but that is well respected. That should keep you busy for a while...incidentally, what's your web address of the site??

  19. #39
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    I can't agree more with all the comments above about Frenzy.



    I think as the time passes on this film more and more people will appreciate it as a great Hitchcock film and find the humour more accessible. I always use the finger snapping scene to judge peoples sense of humour and see if they find it funny as I do.



    I also think it's one the best collection of actors for a Hitchcock film no one gives a duff performance. I 've read in a couple of reviews where people feel Jon Finch was the weak link in the film but I couldn't disagree more I think he makes the central character really interesting and different not a natural hero.

  20. #40
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    Anybody know the names of the 2 anonymous victims in Hitchcock's film - the one in the river at the beginning and the one in the killer's bed at the end. I presume the first one was a stunt girl and the second a professional model.

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