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Thread: Frenzy

  1. #61
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Those movies are still playing to rave reviews here in the USA!!



    I saw all of them (in various places in the world) when they were first released and didn't think they were at all bad!



    A case of Hitchcock being a bit ahead of his time?



    In any case, they are considered classics on this side of the pond.
    Marnie has undergone a major critical reassessment in recent years



    Torn Curtain is IMHO let down by Newman and Andrews having no chemistry between them



    Topaz IMHO is just a thumpingly bad film



    All three films were clobbered on their initial release and failed commercially. Topaz is the real turkey in my book - he seems thoroughly disengaged with the material and it's overlong.

  2. #62
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    [quoteIt is never the less and interesting return to the more darkly comic, brisker-paced films of the '30s. The film is anacronistic though with the significance of the lead character being in tweeds in London - wouldn't have mattered by '70s. [/quote]

    The anachronistic nature of the film is what I particularly love about it ... it's like one of Hitch's 30s films crossed with a 50s Brit crime film .... (say Young and Innocent meets Gideon's Day) .... with a bit of Peeping Tom added for good measure. I think it's a shame Hitch made Family Plot 'cos he would have finished on a real high with Frenzy.



    Bats.

  3. #63
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    The anachronistic nature of the film is what I particularly love about it ... it's like one of Hitch's 30s films crossed with a 50s Brit crime film .... (say Young and Innocent meets Gideon's Day) .... with a bit of Peeping Tom added for good measure. I think it's a shame Hitch made Family Plot 'cos he would have finished on a real high with Frenzy.



    Bats.


    Family Plot was based on the Victor Canning novel The Rainbird Pattern. A truly excellent book and the film is dissapointing to say the least.I regard Frenzy as the last real Hitchcock film.

  4. #64
    Senior Member Country: England harryfielder's Avatar
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    1972

    FRENZY…Director…Alfred Hitchcock…

    I am now working with the Master of filming.

    Where I was born in Islington London, there was a huge warehouse type building on the corner of the Grand Union Canal in New North Road. (Very near the North Pole Pub)

    It was in fact a film studio. As a kid in the forties I used to swim in the canal as it cost nothing entrance fee. (You had to watch out for the large Mocking birds floating on top of the water)

    I think the studio was called Gainsborough and as a kid I remember strangely dressed people popping into the pub on the corner of New North Road and Elizabeth Avenue. (Supporting Artists of the past)

    Anyway, that’s where Alfred Hitchcock made many of his films.

    (I could have bumped into him while I was going swimming and he was popping in for a swift half. It’s a small world)

    ONTO THE FILM…

    I was now the not so proud owner of an old Bedford van and was booked by the 2nd A.D. on Frenzy to report to Covent Garden fruit market for the start of a weeks work...

    There must have been fifty supporting artists working that week as market porters.

    It was thirty years ago but some people still come to mind, like Big Mo Dunster who was stand/in on films for Donald Sutherland. Jimmy (the crow) Hammilton, Eddie Dillon And Bill (the body) Hemmings.

    I remember the day that Donald Sutherland came down to speak to Mo about a private matter and got into one of the shots.(Everyone wants to be in a Hitchcock movie)

    Mo has done well for himself and now lives in the U.S.A. looking after the Sutherland clan. Best wishes Mo, love Boysie.

    Mr. Hitchcock was not very well while he was directing this film and would line up all the shots he wanted and leave the running around to his 1st A.D. (Colin Brewer, I think)

    We filmed all around the market for the next week or so loading vans and unloading vans (Including my old Bedford) but I was more interested in watching the Master at work. Then near the end of the shoot in the market it happened.

    The Master looked at me then at the 1st A.D. and said…

    ‘’Tell that man to climb up on that lorry and start unloading it’’

    (‘’That man’’) he said my name, I was being directed by the great man himself.

    We shot a lot of the inside of the film at Pinewood. Then some stuff with the Bedford Following a potato lorry up and down major roads and that was it.

    I was sorry to see the end of the filming but it’s one film I will never forget.

    If you’re looking down from that great studio in the sky Mr. Hitchcock ‘’That Man’’ will say hello when he gets there.

    Aitch,

  5. #65
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    name='stevie boy']Family Plot was based on the Victor Canning novel The Rainbird Pattern. A truly excellent book and the film is dissapointing to say the least.I regard Frenzy as the last real Hitchcock film.


    I have avoided reading the book due to the film being so awful. I may track down a copy and give it a whirl.



    Bats.

  6. #66
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    it was whilst making Frenzy that Hitch did a Guardian Lecture at the NFT which i was lucky enough to attend.He described the scene of the Archbishops abduction from the cathederal which would later feature in Family Plot.

    I do like Frenzy because it is so redolent of his 30s films.Particularly the Inspector(Michael Bates)whose wife keeps on making him gordon bleu dishes which he doesnt really appreciate.

  7. #67
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    I do like Frenzy because it is so redolent of his 30s films.Particularly the Inspector(Michael Bates)whose wife keeps on making him gordon bleu dishes which he doesnt really appreciate.
    It fits in with the food/sex/consumption/gratification metaphor which runs through the whole film. The ending to me is superb and one of Alf's best.

  8. #68
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    Those movies are still playing to rave reviews here in the USA!!



    I saw all of them (in various places in the world) when they were first released and didn't think they were at all bad!



    A case of Hitchcock being a bit ahead of his time?



    In any case, they are considered classics on this side of the pond.
    I can't imagine Topaz ever getting a rave review. I couldn't even sit through it till the end. It was awful. Torn Curtain was at least entertaining, although it could have been better if Bernard Herrmann had been allowed to write the score. He did write it, in fact, but Hitchcock disliked it, and they went for the more populist music of John whastsisname. (Sorry, name escapes me at the moment - prolific British film composer.)



    Marnie isn't a bad film.



    Haven't watched Frenzy in ages - so long that I don't even recall Bernard Cribbins being in it.

  9. #69
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    Bernard Cribbins and Anna Massey in Frenzy.







    Bats.

  10. #70
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    I have avoided reading the book due to the film being so awful. I may track down a copy and give it a whirl.



    Bats.
    Bats, go get it, it is fabulous.

  11. #71
    Senior Member Country: UK Windthrop's Avatar
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    Bats, go get it, it is fabulous.
    Alot of Canning's novels still make compelling reading. The source material for Frenzy - Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern is also worth a read. La Bern like Canning is almost forgotten now but in their day particularly Canning used to churn out very readeable, compelling yarns.

  12. #72
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    A lot of Canning's novels still make compelling reading. The source material for Frenzy - Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern is also worth a read. La Bern like Canning is almost forgotten now but in their day particularly Canning used to churn out very readeable, compelling yarns.
    I have read that one ... it is very good. Looks like 'The Rainbird Pattern' is going to be a late addition to my Xmas 'wants' list!



    Bats.

  13. #73
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    A lot of Canning's novels still make compelling reading. The source material for Frenzy - Goodbye Piccadilly, Farewell Leicester Square by Arthur La Bern is also worth a read. La Bern like Canning is almost forgotten now but in their day particularly Canning used to churn out very readeable, compelling yarns.
    Thanks I will check out La Bern

  14. #74
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    Frenzy is on sky classics at 9pm on the 17th

  15. #75
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    Anybody know the names of the 2 anonymous victims in Hitchcock's film - the one in the river at the beginning and the one in the killer's bed at the end. I presume the first one was a stunt girl and the second a professional model.
    I'm pretty sure one of them was Margaret Nolan, Tel. I've seen a still of her being attacked in the film but it's from a scene which was deleted. Margaret Nolan started her own website recently and she talked about it wanting a copy of the still which, unfortunately, I was unable to find for her!

  16. #76
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    I'm pretty sure one of them was Margaret Nolan, Tel. I've seen a still of her being attacked in the film but it's from a scene which was deleted. Margaret Nolan started her own website recently and she talked about it wanting a copy of the still which, unfortunately, I was unable to find for her!
    Just realized I misread your message, Tel. If the scene was deleted she can't be one of the girls you're talking about because you recall the victims and MN is not seen at all in the released film.

  17. #77
    Senior Member Country: Romania chuffnobbler's Avatar
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    Watched this masterpiece last night. May well be my favourite Hitchcock. I'm off to London next weekend, and will hunt out some of the locations.



    Sadly, the film's cast list is very short, and the cast credited on IMDB isn't much more use. Can anyone help?



    In the sequence in the Globe, just before Babs quits her job and storms out, Bob Rusk is talking to someone about the cost of potatoes, and then says something like "Have a pint with your uncle Bob". Is the other man Michael Sheard? Mrs Chuff and I both thought it may be him. He has quite a bit of dialogue, some of which sounds like Michael Sheard's voice. He's filmed from afar and is turned slightly away from the camera, so it's difficult to see him properly.



    In the sequence where Dick Blainey leaves the hospital ward disguised as a doctor, lots of people are crowding round the drugged body of the doctor on duty. There's a good close-up on the face of a policeman (black jacket, peaked cap) as he kneels on the floor. Is this William Dysart?



    I am sorry that I can't work out how to do screengrab photos to make things easier ...



    A shame there isn't a bigger and better cast list for this film anywhere that I can fuind, as there are so many people who have just a couple of lines, and I'd love to know who some of them are. (The man standing next to Hitch, by the riverside in the opening scene, who talks about Jack the Ripper).



    Hope people can help, and sorry for being a bit rubbish with the info I've given ...

  18. #78
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    Watched this masterpiece last night. May well be my favourite Hitchcock. I'm off to London next weekend, and will hunt out some of the locations.



    Sadly, the film's cast list is very short, and the cast credited on IMDB isn't much more use. Can anyone help?



    In the sequence in the Globe, just before Babs quits her job and storms out, Bob Rusk is talking to someone about the cost of potatoes, and then says something like "Have a pint with your uncle Bob". Is the other man Michael Sheard? Mrs Chuff and I both thought it may be him. He has quite a bit of dialogue, some of which sounds like Michael Sheard's voice. He's filmed from afar and is turned slightly away from the camera, so it's difficult to see him properly.



    In the sequence where Dick Blainey leaves the hospital ward disguised as a doctor, lots of people are crowding round the drugged body of the doctor on duty. There's a good close-up on the face of a policeman (black jacket, peaked cap) as he kneels on the floor. Is this William Dysart?



    I am sorry that I can't work out how to do screengrab photos to make things easier ...



    A shame there isn't a bigger and better cast list for this film anywhere that I can fuind, as there are so many people who have just a couple of lines, and I'd love to know who some of them are. (The man standing next to Hitch, by the riverside in the opening scene, who talks about Jack the Ripper).



    Hope people can help, and sorry for being a bit rubbish with the info I've given ...
    Chuff, I've checked on the www and Michael Sheard WAS in Frenzy but I can find no reference to William Dysart being in the film. However, this certainly doen't mean he wasn't. He may have been and just not been credited.You probably need to refer this query to one of those "Who is this actor" type of threads we have on this forum where the likes of cornershop and wellendcanons et al solve these problems by showing screen grabs.

  19. #79
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    It is one of my favourite of his films,and certainly a lot better than the vastly overrated Psycho.



    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  20. #80
    Senior Member Euryale's Avatar
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    The man who talks about Jack the Ripper may be Toby Blanshard:



    Frenzy





    E.

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