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  1. #1
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    http://www.donbrockway.com/genevieve.htm



    What can I say? this guy has put in the research.

    My hat is off.

    gm



    [ 08. May 2004, 11:36: Message edited by: DB7 ]

  2. #2
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    Remarkable!What an excellent effort,oh wouldn't the world be idyllic if there were lots more of these wonderful sites?Thanks for letting us know,G.M. thumbs_u

  3. #3
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    I echo that last comment. What a wonderful site - thanks for pointing it out to us!

  4. #4
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Genevieve (1953)



    Sukhdev Sandhu reviews a classic that every film-lover will want to own



    It's often observed, with sadness and regret, that the English don't make road movies: our island is too small and its roads too congested. Still, at least we have Genevieve. This is a film in the tradition of Jerome K Jerome's Three Men in a Boat, all about amateurs having larks in the summertime.





    Delightful: Genevieve

    John Gregson and Dinah Sheridan play a married couple who decide to go head-to-head against their best friends Kenneth More and Kay Kendall in the annual London-to-Brighton antique car rally. They huff and puff almost as much as their wheezing bangers, trying every trick in the book of gamesmanship. It's a sharply observed romantic comedy on wheels, and a very fine set of wheels at that: a twin-cylinder Darracq 1904 that's arguably the real star of the film.



    Gregson and the delicious Sheridan are always squabbling. He's jealous of her previous partners. She thinks he cares more about his car than about her. More and Kendall make a gleefully odd couple: he's bluff and hearty; she's a fashion goddess whose ability to play the bugle won her the name "glam strumpet voluntary" from the film crew.



    Director Henry Cornelius does marvellously well to recreate a car rally on the roads near Uxbridge. How empty they look in that distant Coronation year. And what a funny place England was then: Joyce Grenfell has a winning cameo as a boarding-house keeper who announces that there's no hot water except in the afternoons. Sheridan storms out in a huff, leaving Grenfell to ask: "Is she American?" The whole delightful confection, which feels as fresh today as it did when it was made, is accompanied by a wonderful Oscar-nominated score by harmonica player Larry Adler.

  5. #5
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    Veteren or vintage car rally please, I don't think you get antique cars!



    I always thought a cameo role was when someone played themselves ie. Joyce Grenfell playing Joyce Grenfell! In this film she played a guest house landlady!



    Larry came over here to escape the HUAC (House Unamerican Activities Committee) debacle which blighted so many talented writers and directors. America's loss was our gain!

  6. #6
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Originally posted by samkydd@Sep 9 2005, 12:42 PM



    I always thought a cameo role was when someone played themselves ie. Joyce Grenfell playing Joyce Grenfell! In this film she played a guest house landlady!
    See Wikipedia.

    A cameo role or cameo appearance is a brief and usually uncredited appearance.

    They don't have to be playing themselves.



    Steve

  7. #7
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    I enjoyed the film immensely,but I found the music annoying - but then again I couldn't stand Larry Adler. Does anyone know who played the piano to Larry Adler's harmonica.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: England Harbottle's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Marky B@Sep 9 2005, 12:29 PM

    I enjoyed the film immensely,but I found the music annoying - but then again I couldn't stand Larry Adler. Does anyone know who played the piano to Larry Adler's harmonica.

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    Glad I'm not alone, the "music" really gets on my nerves and spoils what is otherwise a charming picture

  9. #9
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    This film is a gentle characature of England and the (albeit upper class) English. Its an easy to watch film and its fascinating to see a glimpse of England in the early 1950's. I can watch this again and again although I do agree, the wailing of Larry Adlers harmonica is very irritating. Having said that I think we have to appreciate that Larry was a very popular 'artiste' of that period and no doubt the public and the makers of the film were more than happy to listen to his music.

  10. #10
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    Originally posted by Harbottle@Sep 9 2005, 12:41 PM

    Glad I'm not alone, the "music" really gets on my nerves and spoils what is otherwise a charming picture
    Well I was being overly kind to the great Larry Adler because of his HUAC victimisation. Personally I think that harmonica music accompanying other instruments in songs like Little Red Rooster and a few Bob Dylan ones, with the odd short solo is great, but as a lead instrument it is almost like a fairground steam organ with its ability to drive you barmy after a while!



    When it is played over and over in the film it reminds me of the Hancock radio episode The East Cheam Drama Festival when the piano player starts playing every few minutes, and Hancock eventually loses his rag and shouts "Get him out of here!"



    But having said all that the harminica did feature quite a lot in British film and incidental music and The Navy Lark theme on the radio springs to mind.

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  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: England Harbottle's Avatar
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    Originally posted by Rennie@Sep 13 2005, 10:52 AM

    http://www.donbrockway.com/genevieve.htm
    Wonderful web site, many thanks for the pointer Rennie.

  13. #13
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    (Harbottle @ Sep 9 2005, 01:41 PM)

    Glad I'm not alone, the "music" really gets on my nerves and spoils what is otherwise a charming picture
    I watched it last night and worse than the harmonica playing was the awful fake laughter of Kenneth More and John Gregson! With More it was every five minutes "Ha ha ha ha harh!". The best thing about the film was the fantastic film colour that is so unlike real life colour, and seeing wonderful shots of Brighton in the days when the streets were clean and tidy, many years before the scankers and pissheads moved in!

  14. #14
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    As a result of Kay Kendall's albeit unconvincing trumpet-playing mime,many people truly believed that she was a virtuoso on the instrument.Possibly the same people who believed that Bob holness played sax on "Baker Street" and that Mariella Frostrup is Honor Blackman's daughter.



    Cheers



    Jacky

  15. #15
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    Watched it last night as well and enjoyed it immensely. Why is it so better when you chance on a film being broadcast rather than picking out the DVD from the shelf?



    Like Samkydd mentions the unnatural colour is just right for it. But the casting is spot on too with Gregson and More lovely playing characters not so much in their second childhood as never having left their first. Sheridan and Kendall are gorgeous and.. well thats pretty much enough really. No problem with the music for me. Its all part of the feel of the movie. Its one of those time capsule films that connect with you and suggest a very specific period in history.



    Its not flawless of course and it does feature one of the worst continuity errors in mainstream cinema; the one where during Kays trumpet solo Michael Balfour hands her the trumpet. Because he sits down in a different place behind her in different takes he seems to jump around the stage. At one point I thought he might be playing twins. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/thumbsup.gif[/img]

  16. #16
    Senior Member Country: Scotland julian_craster's Avatar
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    And the trumpet was played by Kenny Baker (as readers of the 2nd edition of the Encyclopedia of British Film will know !) (see Music- Jazz in BF)

  17. #17
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    This site is truely amazeing,i never knew so many other people would like the same kinds of films as me,thanks to all for provideing links to more information of my fav films.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Why I love: Genevieve (1953)

    Sukhdev Sandhu in praise of an English classic that will never run out of puff.



    By Sukhdev Sandhu



    Henry Cornelius’s Genevieve, set during the annual London to Brighton vintage car rally, is an English classic. Its road-movie comedy, bristling sexual tension, and splendid performances from John Gregson, Kenneth More, Dinah Sheridan and Kay Kendall make it as charming to watch today as on its first release.



    Larry Adler’s harmonica-soaked score, which won him an Oscar nomination, makes it especially lovely to listen to. It meanders and bumps along, evoking not only the gentle eccentricity of the suburban and rural spaces through which the antique cars move, but also their relatively modest speed. It is, like all the music in the film, mixed at a sound level that is pleasingly restrained, far from the eardrum-crushing volume of today’s digital dynamics.



    Adler’s score charms me, but I’m also delighted by the film’s sound design. The cars sigh, chug, parp, blast, pop. In the Brighton bed-and-breakfast at which Gregson and Sheridan’s characters find themselves staying, the light bulbs sputter, the sink tap wheezes, the bed springs wang and expire, the bells outside their bedroom ring so loudly that the walls shake.



    For men and women of a certain generation, these sounds are supremely evocative, capturing as they do the austere audio-landscape of post-war Britain. To listen to them now is to be transported back to another age.



    How much more desirable it would be to travel around in unsteady crocks like Genevieve than in modern cars whose glazed windows make the outside world almost inaudible and whose interiors are noisy with air conditioning, talk radio and kids playing computer games in the back.



    The characters speak in a fashion that one no longer hears in modern British cinema. Their diction is perky, precise, a tad posh; free of Estuary English, mall slang or garbled obscenities.



    There’s a winning equability and ease in the way they talk; the rudest epithet any of them ever exclaims is 'Blast!’ When Dinah Sheridan raises her voice to lament the poor service at her hotel, an elderly resident pipes up: “Is she American?? A different age. Sigh.

  19. #19
    Senior Member Country: UK Dandy Forsdyke's Avatar
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    I love Genevieve. Very unusual for a British movie to be made in colour in 1953 - in fact not many American films were made in colour at this time.



    So quintessentially English but actually written by Missouri-born William Rose. He also wrote The Ladykillers, The Smallest Show On Earth, Guess Who's Coming To Dinner and It's A Mad Mad Mad Mad World.

  20. #20
    Senior Member Country: UK RogerThornhill's Avatar
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    "No one has ever complained before"



    "Are they Americans ?"


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