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Thread: Ray Winstone

  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
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    Ray Winstone: Playing by Ray's rules



    In King Arthur, Ray Winstone brings a touch of Hackney to Camelot, and he's set to do the same to Hollywood, says Ryan Gilbey

    23 July 2004





    For a man who has played snivelling thugs, intimidating crooks, two wife-beaters and one abusive father, it's surprising how quickly Ray Winstone can put a person at ease. As I'm loitering outside the hotel suite where he is holding court for the day to discuss his new film, King Arthur, I can hear that the female interviewer before me has assumed Winstone's style of speaking, all glottal stops and resounding "gor blimeys". When she emerges from the room, she looks like Felicity Kendal, rather than the hatchet-faced EastEnders cast member that her voice had promised. And it happens to me too - not the Felicity Kendal part, obviously, but the sudden descent into overfamiliarity and leisurely swearing. My questions all begin with Ray-this and Ray-that, which, frankly, was not part of the plan.



    You could put it down to two things. Many people want to be Ray Winstone's friend. (Wasn't that why David Beckham invited him to his birthday bash, even though they had never met before?) Secondly, and this is not entirely unconnected, people may be a little bit afraid of him.



    Winstone is 47 now, and a father to three daughters. He looks pink and perky on the morning we meet - shaved and showered and scrubbed raw. He tells me that he used to get a lot of looks on trains shortly after he played the lead in Scum. Travellers would spend the whole journey sizing him up, and only smile weakly or offer a compliment when it was their stop. Winstone has moved into the vicinity of being a national treasure in the 27 years since Alan Clarke cast him as the snarling borstal boy in that banned BBC play (and the film version two years later).



    When I last met Winstone, seven years ago, he complained that no one was willing let him play a nice guy. "They know I'm all right at bashing people up," he reflected, "but they don't know if I can do the other stuff."



    All that has changed now - he tackled romance in Fanny and Elvis, played a chirpy cockney not especially disposed to punching people in Last Orders, and made a bid for the country's affections by being his cheery, salt-of-the-earth self on TV shows such as The Kumars at No 42 and Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? His retired hoodlum in Sexy Beast was a loving portrait of mellowed machismo. And even as he leered after Nicole Kidman and tortured defenceless old women in Cold Mountain, he expressed in that character a melancholy regret, as though he was incapable of halting behaviour that he knew to be wrong.



    Despite this gradual softening, the overpowering cruelty of his best work cannot be dispelled. Once you've witnessed the twisted concentration on his face as he puts the boot into Kathy Burke in Nil by Mouth, it is not an image easily relinquished. "People have said, 'Oh, that film must have been so harrowing'," he says, hunting impatiently around the room for an ashtray. Locating one, he takes a hungry drag on a cigarette. "But it wasn't. I've never had such a ball in my life." He leans in close. "Don't get me wrong. That don't mean I weren't concentrating. It's just that I'd already done me homework. You imagine spending all day on set brooding about beating your wife up - you'd be in a nuthouse. I'm one of them blokes who can be laughing and joking and then it's, 'Action!', and - bam! - I'm in there. I can switch from blah-blah-blah to 'You cad'."



    Only he doesn't call me a cad. He uses another insult beginning with "c". And he bites down greedily on the word as though it's a leg of chicken.



    His character in King Arthur, a loutish warrior named Bors, is an agreeable fellow compared with some of Winstone's other roles. Bors is always wandering into scenes of carnage and saying things like, "What a bloody mess!", or boasting merrily about the size of his penis. And there's no denying that Winstone gives this drab adventure some coarse energy; swinging his gorilla arms all over the screen, he is somehow both meatier and sweeter than his more conventionally pretty co-stars, Clive Owen and Ioan Gruffudd, who look too poised and pampered to ever get any dirt under their fingernails.



    The Ray Winstone whom you see in King Arthur isn't markedly different from the one who rubs his hands together and booms, "Yo-ho-ho-ho!", when room service brings in his breakfast. The food has been garnished in such a way so as to disguise the fact that it's a bacon butty, but Winstone isn't one for pretensions. He peels apart each sandwich and administers a dollop of brown sauce before gluing the slices back together and tucking in. "D'you mind if I...?" he asks with his mouth already full.



    The way he tells it, acting was just an accident that blossomed into a career. "I got the role on the way that I walked down the corridor. After the BBC version got banned, I retired from the industry. Then they offered me the film. Eight weeks hanging out in Torquay with Clarkie and me mates. I thought it'd be a nice holiday, then I'd go back to dossing around. Only it didn't work out like that."



    A role in Quadrophenia followed, and in no time, this monkey wrench of a man was one of the new faces of British youth, earning himself comparisons with Cagney, and the adoration of boys whose nearest brush with violence was when they got a nick from their first Bic razor. "Those films wouldn't have been possible without the 1960s. Your Tom Courtenays, your Albert Finneys. They were the ones that proved you could be an actor even if you didn't speak right." He briefly imagines himself in a Merchant-Ivory production of Scum, purely for his own amusement. "Can you imagine it? 'I say, dear boy, where's your farking tool?'."



    Everything seemed to go quiet for Winstone after Quadrophenia: a case of feared today, gone tomorrow. Or, in his words: "I became a really bad actor. I got bored and lazy. I've been lucky enough to do some good stuff since Nil by Mouth. The real test would be to do a bit of shit and see if I can pull it off."



    Anyone who saw him riffing on his gangster image in the glorified home movies Final Cut and Love, Honour and Obey will confirm that this is not an experiment that should be repeated in a hurry. But it's churlish to gripe about the occasional mistake, when so much of the material that Winstone has chosen since Nil by Mouth has displayed an uncommon curiosity and self-awareness over any commercial considerations.



    One thing at which he has excelled has been placing himself in oddball partnerships that have revealed unexpected complexities in his persona. It might not have been the wisest move to follow his lacerating portrayal of an alcoholic brute in Nil by Mouth by playing a father who abuses his teenage daughter in The War Zone, but the trump card in that film was the casting of Winstone and Tilda Swinton as husband and wife. Swinton teased out the vulnerability in Winstone, never more so than when she scrubbed his bare back at the kitchen sink; she might have been tenderising a slab of meat.



    There was even better to come, in Ripley's Game, which should by rights have spawned a spin-off series: a single movie didn't provide enough time to savour the mutually affectionate clash-of-the-titans between Ray Winstone and John Malkovich. But Winstone knows, without prompting, that he was a lucky devil to get a movie as juicy as Sexy Beast, the low-key thriller that allowed this established hard nut to be terrorised by Ben Kingsley of all people. "I know!" he guffaws. "Me and Gandhi!"



    When he discusses Sexy Beast, he comes over rather serious, as though to refer to it casually would be disrespectful. "After doing Nil by Mouth, I thought, 'That's it, innit? That's the way to do it'. I didn't know how I was gonna better it. And did I really want to better it? Was it really a competition? And if so, whom was I competing with?" He pauses, chews on his bacon, and gives the matter some consideration. "The only way to choose stuff is based on the quality of the scripts. And when I read Sexy Beast, I thought, 'These are some clever b*****ds...'."



    That film was a hit in the US, but he has so far resisted any overtures from Hollywood, perhaps because the industry there makes him uneasy. "I've cracked it here," he reasons. "And I'm happy. Why would I want to go out there and start all over again?" He had a couple of meetings in Los Angeles, four or five years back, and came out of them not exactly bruised but certainly bewildered. "It was these two women. I went in and they said, 'So what can we do for you?'. I just said, 'I dunno'. And that was that.



    "I went off to another meeting later the same day, and I thought, 'I've gotta do better than that'. So, when they asked me, 'What have you been doing lately?', I told them about The War Zone, mentioned Tim [Roth, the film's director]. They said, 'Oh, what's that about?'. And I sat there for an hour and a half, telling them the whole bleeding story: 'And then he does her up the arse... And at the end, they stab him...' They had these frozen smiles on their faces the whole time. They only wanted to make chitchat."



    He plays it innocent, but he must have known what he was doing. It's part of the deal, this good-humoured abrasiveness, just as a blindingly insincere smile comes with the Tom Cruise package. And there is something, too, about Hollywood that this straight-up, red-blooded Hackney bloke intrinsically mistrusts. "You go to LA and they've all got these accents. They're like, 'Oh my God, Ray, how are you?'." He stands up and strikes some effeminate poses. "The geezer's got four kids, and he's camp as anything. You think, 'What's going on here? Am I going out of me head?'."



    But Hollywood wants him now. And he can return on his own terms - head held high rather than cap in hand. When he tells me that he has some meetings scheduled in LA in a few weeks' time, I secretly pray that he is taking a documentary camera-crew with him. When it comes to Anglo-American culture clashes, Mr Bean will have nothing on Ray Winstone.

  2. #2
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Great interview. I see that they're showing Face (1997) with Ray & Robert Carlyle (confusingly playing a character called Ray), on BBC3 at 22:30 on Friday 30th July.



    Steve

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    From today's Daily Telegraph this piece will no doubt be of interest to many on the forum:



    Ray Winstone was a self-confessed 'toe-rag' who was thrown out of drama school; how is it that, now, he's working non-stop?



    For his next role as Beowulf, Ray Winstone has grown a beard; a great, big, shaggy thing, with a hint of a gingery tinge. Cigarettes keep disappearing inside this beard, re-emerging as cylinders of ash. Bad words pop out.



    'I always thought the idea of acting was not to be seen acting': Ray Winstone



    And so, too, does a long and rippling laugh, like wind blowing through gorse. Why not? Life is sweet for 48-year-old Winstone, a former schoolboy boxing champion from the rougher side of town, but a big star now. Getting bigger all the time, in fact.



    A late-life career surge finds him making The Departed in New York with Jack Nicholson and Martin Scorsese, filming Breaking and Entering in London with Anthony Minghella, and just about to appear at the box office in The Proposition with Emily Watson.



    There is television work, too: the lead role in Vincent, a new ITV detective series, while he will star in a new adaptation of Sweeney Todd, made by his own production company, which will be shown on BBC at Christmas.



    "Yes, plenty of blood for Christmas, that's what we like," he says, rubbing his hands together. He never seems to stop working these days, not that he's complaining.



    "I never thought I would be doing what I am doing today. Coming from where I did, I used to feel like an outcast in this business," he says, but he doesn't feel like that any more. No wonder, for there is a gathering surge of respect for his extraordinary talents and he is one of Britain's greatest actors; such a natural on the small or big screen that watching him is like falling through a rip in the celluloid and into his world. In his most famous roles, such as wife-beater Ray in Nil By Mouth, or retired robber Gal in Sexy Beast, you can't see the seams, or the stitching, where he ends and the role begins.



    "Yeah. Well. I don't ever want to be caught out acting. I always thought the idea of acting was not to be seen acting, but that is just my opinion," he says. Apparently, not everybody agrees with him. Who could that be?



    "Some directors. They want to see you perform. A lot of directors get a bit nervy about not seeing someone perform. They think you aren't doing anything. I have had directors saying: 'If only you would take it seriously, Ray.' Well, f--- off! I do. They just haven't got a clue what is going on in my head. A really top director once kept me in a room and said: 'If only you would really concentrate we could...' And I just looked at him. We could what? He didn't have a clue about me or where I was coming from. Not performing? Not performing is the whole point."



    He's not talking about Scorsese, who "has that bedside manner that all great directors do - they love you, you don't even know they are directing you", nor Minghella, whom he rates as "a clever and good man; it's a pleasure to work for him". He's talking about things that happened before, when he was younger and angrier. Mouthier. More stubborn.



    Ray Winstone grew up in Hackney and Enfield, where his family had a fruit and vegetable business. He was London schoolboy boxing champion three times and boxed for England twice, and was at drama school only briefly, thrown out for pushing nails through a lolly stick and using it to puncture the headmistress's tyres after she said he was a "danger" to the other pupils because of his accent.



    Today, Winstone concedes that he was a "bit of a toe-rag", but is still annoyed that after setting his Julius Caesar speech in a pub for a drama test, he got no marks for imagination.



    "I am not even saying I did it very well, but I got nought for this, and nought for that, nought for the performance. I didn't even get one mark for doing it differently from everyone else. Nought for imagination! I took a lot of notice of that. I thought, you lot know nothing. It made me very determined."



    This, then, was the spark to his gunpowder, and how fascinating that it still rankles, three decades later, even though he claims to have mellowed.



    "But I have. I've become less angry as I've got older. It's called growing up, isn't it? Acting helps. Its like being in therapy, you get a lot out of your system. But there's a lack of energy in me, too. You know, I just don't have the energy to be angry. I'm not an angry young man any more, I'm just a boring old fart."



    He is glad, however, that the kind of international success he is beginning to enjoy now did not happen earlier, when it might have messed him up good and proper.





    'I love being a thug, but I like being a lover too': Ray Winstone in 'Sexy Beast'



    "I probably couldn't have handled it, I probably would have gone off the edge, you know, ended up in prison or something. I like the fact that it is happening now, when I'm older and wiser and enjoying it. And my wife and kids can come along and enjoy it, too."



    They went to Romania, when he was making Cold Mountain; they've been to America, where they met Nicholson, who Winstone describes as "proper, a cool dude", while Leonardo DiCaprio and Matt Damon are "lovely kids".



    Meanwhile, back at home in Essex, Winstone says he's a domestic god and really, really good around the house, but I'm not sure if I believe him. Not so long ago, he got out the Hoover to have a quick vac along the skirting boards and his wife was so shocked that she ran upstairs for her camera and took a photograph. That sounds like evidence for the prosecution, not the defence.



    No, no, insists the actor known for playing a variety of granite-faced gangsters, thugs, murderous hit men and the occasional wife beater in gritty British films, he does his bit. Honest he does. If the missus is out for the day, he will tidy up and make dinner as a surprise. He's "bang on with the old pasta", he knows how to age a steak properly, then cook it so that it's still pink in the middle. He's also a dab hand with fish, especially his favourite, skate.



    "I do it with capers, black pepper and then white wine vinegar and all that. I like that. Lovely," he says. Then he adds sadly: "But I am not great at battering."



    Elsewhere, Winstone admits that when on location he is a neat freak and keeps everything "spotless", but he does expect a bit of cossetting when he gets back home.



    "But not to the extent that I can't do a thing," he pleads. "I do my own ironing sometimes, but when it comes to washing the plates, I can't have none of that. I have never done that in my life. So I am more domesticated when I am away from home and a bit of a slob when I get back. I suppose that is male chauvinism, is it? I don't mean it to be, but there it is."



    Home and family are the centre of his life, and his roots are clearly sunk deep.



    "I am a husband and father first. Acting comes after that," he says. Winstone met his Manchester-born wife Elaine in 1979, and they have been married for just over 25 years. During leaner times at the beginning of his career, he would tell his little daughters that it was all going to work out fine, that one day they would live in a house in the country, with ponies and a swimming pool.



    Eventually, the fairy tale did come true, and they live on a spread near Duxford airfield, where he loves to sit in the garden and hear Lancasters and Spitfires drone over on their way to an airshow. Late one summer, he and Elaine were sitting having a drink, thinking that it was all perfect, but something was missing. What was it? Another baby.



    Ellie, now four, joins Lois (23) and 19-year-old Jaime in the Winstone ranks, and Dad says that what would make his life utterly complete would be "another seven kids". Yet one of the nation's favourite tough guys has reservations about certain areas of childcare.





    "I'm a hands-on dad all right, except when it comes to changing nappies. I was never that good at that. I would put the mask on."



    Mask? Mask??



    "Yeah, the mask. Like Jesse James, you know? I'd tie the little mask on and start, but get stuff everywhere and in the end my wife said 'get out of the way, you are absolutely useless'. But I am hands-on with the other things, I like the clean bits. Like feeding them milk. A little bit of wind is lovely, I don't mind all that. I will cuddle them all night long, but when it comes to changing nappies, gah. No thanks. Leave it out."



    Padding about in his jeans and Gucci loafers, he still moves lightly, with a boxer's grace, even if he does appear to be all torso, like a robin. He's amiable and chatty and good fun, and being surrounded by women for most of his life has put him uncommonly in touch with his feminine side. He has a lot of emotional intelligence, and can talk about how he feels with candour and sincerity.



    "Yeah, I know," he says, "but it doesn't always go down a storm in the pub." But he just can't help himself. He's got it all worked out.



    "If you play a thug when you are younger, they want you to play a thug for ever. I love being a thug, but I like being a lover, too," he says. "I like playing men who have got that little bit of feminine side about them. I can throw a table through a window like any one else, but I do like the emotional side of things."



    Maybe he should play more romantic leads? He sparks up another cigarette and strokes his beard.



    "The thing is, I've always loved playing romantic leads. Most of the stuff I do is love stories anyway. Even Nil By Mouth was a love story, you know. It might not have been that romantic, but it was about two people who really loved each other, but just didn't know how to tell one another. I love playing love stories. Its much better to kiss someone than to punch them, you know what I mean?"





    'Vincent' starts on ITV1 next month

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    A National Treasure

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

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    (Marky B @ Sep 21 2005, 10:08 AM)

    A National Treasure

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    More of a rough diamond but I know what you mean.


    I'd probably classify him as a National Treasure as well. A male one, that is - there are standards to be maintained you know.



    FELL

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    name='Fellwanderer' date='Sep 21 2005, 10:45 AM')

    More of a rough diamond but I know what you mean.

    I'd probably classify him as a National Treasure as well. A male one, that is - there are standards to be maintained you know
    FELL
    Has Jenny A got kids and stuff and a big mansion out in the sticks?

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    Senior Member Country: England harryfielder's Avatar
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    The boy did good,


    Aitch,

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    No matter how many films I see RW in, I just can't 'take' to him. I think it's a memory thing from schooldays. He reminds me of the 'school bullies' I encountered in my youth (long ago)! I suppose I should try to rise above those feelings, but I find it difficult.

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    I always used to think that Ray was only able to play working class, Jack the Lad, wife beating, tough guy. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/pyth.gif[/img] types.

    Then I saw him take on the role of Henry VIII for television and I realised what a top actor he really is.

    He may not be subtle but he is realistic.



    Dave.

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    (JIM @ Sep 22 2005, 08:03 AM)

    No matter how many films I see RW in, I just can't 'take' to him. I think it's a memory thing from schooldays. He reminds me of the 'school bullies' I encountered in my youth (long ago)! I suppose I should try to rise above those feelings, but I find it difficult.
    I know exactly what you mean. I was a little runt at school (no, not a misspelling it does start with an 'r') and it wasn't until I was 17 that I shot up in height to 6' 4" (which co-incided with my introduction to Guiness and I don't mean Sir Alec). This new found build and height gave me a lot more confidence, so much so that I was going to make a return to a school reunion and beat the crap out of the school bullies.



    I never did of course, but strangely enough my son and his friends suffered as well at school from one particular bully who was in the fourth form when my son was a scraggy first year, but he didn't tell me any of this until recently, and consequently his first four years at school were miserable to say the least (the bully stayed on for A levels)!



    After leaving school my nipper joined the Royal Marine Commandos, became proficient at boxing, karate and kick boxing and he actually went back to our old town when he was on leave to literally beat the living daylights out of this ex school bully. Unfortunately it turned out that the bully had died from a drugs overdose, which was a shame because he never got his rightful come uppance!

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    (samkydd @ Sep 23 2005, 09:42 AM)

    I know exactly what you mean. I was a little runt at school (no, not a misspelling it does start with an 'r') and it wasn't until I was 17 that I shot up in height to 6' 4" (which co-incided with my introduction to Guiness and I don't mean Sir Alec). This new found build and height gave me a lot more confidence, so much so that I was going to make a return to a school reunion and beat the crap out of the school bullies.



    I never did of course, but strangely enough my son and his friends suffered as well at school from one particular bully who was in the fourth form when my son was a scraggy first year, but he didn't tell me any of this until recently, and consequently his first four years at school were miserable to say the least (the bully stayed on for A levels)!



    After leaving school my nipper joined the Royal Marine Commandos, became proficient at boxing, karate and kick boxing and he actually went back to our old town when he was on leave to literally beat the living daylights out of this ex school bully. Unfortunately it turned out that the bully had died from a drugs overdose, which was a shame because he never got his rightful come uppance!
    How does the saying go:"Bullying is a strength recognised only by the weak"!

    Ta Ta

    Marky B

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    How does the saying go:"Bullying is a strength recognised only by the weak"!

    Ta Ta

    Marky B
    I read some research on this many moons ago and looking at a few live cases it would appear that some bullies can often be the victims of bullying within their own environment ie. at home, by siblings or parents. Consequently they can only relieve the torment of being perpetually belittled and bullied by finding a suitable weaker person to bully outside the home.



    Wife beaters can so often be people with very low self-esteem who hold a lowly position in employment and society, and are usually the type who does as the boss says no matter what, and then whinges to everyone else about being dumped on! They put up with humiliation at work and keep their frustrations bottled up. Consequently when they get home they can become The Boss, a bully and a tyrant to their own family and physical violence is often used to relieve their immediate frustration. The bully knows he will probably get away with it. Back in his workplace he's the same placid person as usual and wouldn't say boo to a goose!



    Which reminds me of when my old man was a copper in the wilds of Norfolk. He was called out to a remote cottage because the husband had been beating up his wife and kids for the umpteenth time, and a neighbour reported it. It was the first time my old man had visited the place and he hated domestic violence. He took the bloke outside, a lowly farm labourer, beat ten bells of crap out of him and then gave him ten minutes to pack a bag and leave! The woman didn't want him charged or even to leave because it was a tide cottage and if the husband left she'd be evicted. But her husband was so scared he packed and left with my old man driving the police van behind him to make sure he quickened his pace until they were clear of the village.



    My old man spoke to the farmer the next day, and he let the woman and kids stay on there until the council fixed them up with a place a few weeks later. The husband never returned home and everyone lived happily ever after. Now why can't policemen do that sort of thing anymore?

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    Senior Member Country: England Harbottle's Avatar
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    Never been able to take to Winstone at all an awful actor in my view, in fact I actually avoid watching anything he is in I put him in the same catagory as Robson Green, Jimmy Nail and a host of others

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    Ive found his acting two dimensions short of three,he dosn't offend me like some [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/rolleyes.gif[/img] he gave a powerfull performance in nil by mouth(but well within his range),but imo his best performance so far was in Tim Roth's the Warzone,but he was blasted off the screen by, Lara Belmont,apparently picked off the street having never acted before ??



    cheers Ollie.

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    (Fellwanderer @ Sep 29 2005, 01:30 PM)

    Toe rag must have dug into the subconsciousness pretty quickly as I would never have thought it was as late as the 1970s before it became common parlance - and I don't think I ever saw an epsiode of The Sweeney when it was originally aired. As for its spelling - I've always assumed it was toe rag.

    FELL
    "Toe Rag" makes more sense than "Tow Rag" but I've heard that it was also used by the British Army many moons ago when we were still adding new pink bits of The British Empire to the maps. It was a detrimental name for someone who was considered to be a bit of a low life scoundrel, and was an English mispronunciation of the word "Touareg", the name of a tribe of nomadic arabs in the Sahara who were treated with the same contempt as gypsies or "pykies".

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    (samkydd @ Sep 29 2005, 01:52 PM)

    "Toe Rag" makes more sense than "Tow Rag" but I've heard that it was also used by the British Army many moons ago when we were still adding new pink bits of The British Empire to the maps. It was a detrimental name for someone who was considered to be a bit of a low life scoundrel, and was an English mispronunciation of the word "Touareg", the name of a tribe of nomadic arabs in the Sahara who were treated with the same contempt as gypsies or "pykies".
    What is this Call My Bluff now?

    Ray Winstone's new series called Vincent starts next Monday on ITV1 at 9pm. Having seen a trailer I was disappointed to discover that it's not a mini-series about Van Gogh!

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    I just loved the way Winstone and that guy from East Enders were trying to out-Cockney each other.

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    I'd never heard of Ray Winston until I saw him in Ripley's Game -very good! So I immediately went out an rented Sexy Beast and I'm afraid I'm now a devoted fan! I heard he was cast in Beowulf, but cast in the animated version as the voice of Beowulf. Now, Gerald Butler is cast as Beowulf in the live action Beowulf and Grendel with a release date unknown!

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    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    Thanks to DB7 for the alert. In case you didn't see this notice in the TV thread, coming up for all Ray Winstone fans:



    Sexy Beast

    22:10 on Sunday 26th February on more4.



    Thriller in which a retired gangster's psychotic ex-colleague tries to persuade him to work on one last job. Now living in Spain with his wife and friends, the former criminal is far from keen to renew his law-breaking ways, but the intimidating visitor is adamant that his friend should come out of retirement for a bank job. The lives of all those involved hang in the balance as the two strong men conduct a battle of wills.

    Director: Jonathan Glazer



    Starring: Ray Winstone, Ben Kingsley, Ian McShane, Amanda Redman, James Fox



    (Widescreen, Subtitles, 2000, 18, 3 Star)

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