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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by taffy1967
    After tracking down a copy of 'I Start Counting' (1969) and discovering how much I still liked that film, even though I hadn't seen it since it got shown on TV back in 1982?



    I really hope we get a release of 'The Snow Goose'.



    I wouldn't hold your breath! Whoever holds the rights [which is a bit of a mystery] seems not to be in the slightest bit bothered about releasing it. The BBC say it up to Hallmark, Hallmark say they won't because of objections from the Gallico estate but apparently the Gallico estate have no objection - so it seems to be Catch-22

  2. #42
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    Another Britmovie member has told me he remembers seeing a clip from The Snow Goose on an early edition of It'll Be Alright On The Night - the scene when Rhayader sets out for Dunkirk and Frith wishes him "God speed" - the joke being that the boat kept being washed back into shore.



    At the time, the member didn't realise which film it had come from.



    Does anyone else recall that?



    If it was shown [and it would have been ITV!], it begs the question why couldn't the whole film be shown again.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: UK Freddy's Avatar
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    You might have already done this, but I notice that it is only in Richard Harris's filmography on the BFI site that it lists he was on It'll Be Alright On The Night numbers 1 and 2 (both 1979). There is no mention of IBAOTN in Jenny's filmography.



    On the subject of Copyright, Terence Davies in one of the extras on the 'Of Time and the City' dvd mentions how difficult it was getting copyright for some of the archive film and words, it was only at the very last minute that T S Elliot's estate gave permission for lines from the Four Quartets to be read on the cinema screen.



    FReddy

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Freddy
    You might have already done this, but I notice that it is only in Richard Harris's filmography on the BFI site that it lists he was on It'll Be Alright On The Night numbers 1 and 2 (both 1979). There is no mention of IBAOTN in Jenny's filmography.
    Thanks - didn't think of trying there That actually ties in with my informant's memory as he though it might have been the first or second IBAOTH.



    It's a shame that the BFI database is still closed for updates as, regardless of any missing items, hers is two years out of date so I guess it's the same for most living entrants.



    Unbelievably, I found episode 2 and am busy downloading - and keeping my fingers crossed!




    On the subject of Copyright, Terence Davies in one of the extras on the 'Of Time and the City' dvd mentions how difficult it was getting copyright for some of the archive film and words, it was only at the very last minute that T S Elliot's estate gave permission for lines from the Four Quartets to be read on the cinema screen.



    FReddy
    The rightsholder issue regarding The Snow Goose seems most odd since it is claimed that the Gallico Estate no longer have a problem with its release. I can only assume whoever had the rights for the aborted remake also managed to get hold of the original and is sitting on it for purely selfish reasons.

  5. #45
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    Well I'm pretty sure that sequence did appear on an early 'It'll Be Alright On The Night' and I can't think of any other show from way back when that did similar things with the unused blooper film cuts (if that's the correct term?).



    So perhaps the fact they managed to source the unused blooper film cuts from The Snow Goose meant it didn't have any affect on the actual film itself?



    Either way I definitely remember hearing Jenny Agutter saying 'God Speed' to a bloke who was having difficulties with his boat.



    Great to have a copy of that film though and I love your new avatar picture of Jenny Fellwanderer.




  6. #46
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    Paging through this list of favorite British films, and this being my first post to this forum, what a pleasure to see The Snow Goose not only listed but enjoying a lively discussion. It was executive produced by my old friend and former colleague, Duane C. Bogie, when he was with Hallmark Hall of Fame. As is the case with many here, I see, my interest was prompted by the presence of Jenny Agutter. What was it about her, aside from the obvious, that made her such a compelling figure from that era? At any rate, I haven't seen the film since Duane gave me a spotty VHS copy back in 1987. And I don't remember it being televised in the US since the 1970s. Pity.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by taffy1967
    Jenny Agutter is just simply adorable in every way, always has been and always will be.



    Jenny Agutter has been popular in the United States, but in a much more subdued way. I think there is something in the voice, the dress, and physical appeal that says, "Off Limits" to most American male viewers. And this fantasy of accessiblity seems to be a key ingredient to achieving star status in the US. Without it . . . you ride below the waves. That said, what is it about her that makes you English/British so overwhelmingly obsessed with her? Could it be the obverse? She is so clearly unobtainable that she enhances her appeal?

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulcornelius
    Jenny Agutter has been popular in the United States, but in a much more subdued way. I think there is something in the voice, the dress, and physical appeal that says, "Off Limits" to most American male viewers. And this fantasy of accessiblity seems to be a key ingredient to achieving star status in the US. Without it . . . you ride below the waves. That said, what is it about her that makes you English/British so overwhelmingly obsessed with her? Could it be the obverse? She is so clearly unobtainable that she enhances her appeal?
    You make some good points, PaulC. It's probably me but I had never, well almost, heard of Jenny before I joined this forum which almost to a person loves Jenny. I now very much appreciate her film work and the humanitarian work she does privately.



    But, like Paul, I wonder at the 100% appeal in the Uk but not in the US. I don't think it's solely due to visibility or publicity, nor to nudity which was organic to the films she was in and would have enhanced her appeal to a part of the US market.



    Seeing THE SNOW GOOSE: In honour of Jenny and the film, I made the long trek to the UCLA archives to see THE SNOW GOOSE, one of two clear prints available in the world, I'm told. What a relief to see the film clearly for the first time which affords a wonderful view of the landscape, sky visuals, etc. The other print is at the BFI.



    If any of you are going to UCLA, drop me a PM, and I'll give you some tips on getting to view the film.



    All the best,



    Barbara

  9. #49
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    Barbara, I admit to being captivated by Jenny Agutter myself. But her appeal to the English seems to me, from afar, as quite magical. And it covers generations. I'm a few years (two or three) younger than she is, but her work is contemporaneous with my life. Yet I remember teaching in Germany in the late 1980s, and there were some English exchange students from Sunderland at my university. To a person, they were all enthralled with her--and, at the time, she was old enough to be their mother. Now, she is old enough to be their grandmother. But absolutely nothing has changed. In some ways, she seems to have taken on the iconic qualities of an Ealing film: her films, especially her best ones, are small and personal; they evoke a much more personal and even nostalgic atmosphere; and, of course, she is attractive. Compare her with Julie Christie. When I think of Christie, after all is said and done, I think of two movies, Darling and McCabe and Mrs. Miller. In the former, she projects the nightmare shallowness of chic; in the latter, she is just about the anti-thesis of the Agutter persona. That is, she plays a role that revels in being "available" to the male fantasy. Christie became a much bigger star than Agutter, but I'll bet a hundred years from now it will be Agutter in whom the English indulge their memories.

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulcornelius
    Barbara, I admit to being captivated by Jenny Agutter myself. But her appeal to the English seems to me, from afar, as quite magical. And it covers generations. I'm a few years (two or three) younger than she is, but her work is contemporaneous with my life. Yet I remember teaching in Germany in the late 1980s, and there were some English exchange students from Sunderland at my university. To a person, they were all enthralled with her--and, at the time, she was old enough to be their mother. Now, she is old enough to be their grandmother. But absolutely nothing has changed. In some ways, she seems to have taken on the iconic qualities of an Ealing film: her films, especially her best ones, are small and personal; they evoke a much more personal and even nostalgic atmosphere; and, of course, she is attractive. Compare her with Julie Christie. When I think of Christie, after all is said and done, I think of two movies, Darling and McCabe and Mrs. Miller. In the former, she projects the nightmare shallowness of chic; in the latter, she is just about the anti-thesis of the Agutter persona. That is, she plays a role that revels in being "available" to the male fantasy. Christie became a much bigger star than Agutter, but I'll bet a hundred years from now it will be Agutter in whom the English indulge their memories.
    Paul,



    I suspect you may be right that in Jenny's best films "small and personal", e.g. The Snow Goose, The Railway Children, and Walkabout, done in her late teens, perhaps she captured the imagination of her UK audience and the image in those films became frozen in time, or iconic as you put it, and unchanged by the diverse body of work she went on to do which includes quite different roles in Spooks, Logan's Run, Othello, Irina Palm, etc.



    To Julie Christie's credit, a stunning woman even now, she has continued to grow as an actress, witness her superb performances in Hamlet, Afterglow, and Away from Her. It's difficult for gorgeous women to make male audiences get past the visual impact of their beauty to appreciate the value of their performance.



    All the best,



    Barbara

  11. #51
    Senior Member Country: Germany Wolfgang's Avatar
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    All women are whores to some extent. Some charge you �30 for 30 minutes, others want diamond rings, but we always pay for it in one way or another. Jenny Agutter's appeal is peculiar. Julie Christie became far bigger star but hasn't been adopted by later generations like Jenny has despite her high hit rate of classics. We watched Hayley Mills grow up in film too but again has not been adopted by later generations. There is no discernable reason why Jenny should be placed on pedestal above those two but she is.

  12. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulcornelius
    Paging through this list of favorite British films, and this being my first post to this forum, what a pleasure to see The Snow Goose not only listed but enjoying a lively discussion. It was executive produced by my old friend and former colleague, Duane C. Bogie, when he was with Hallmark Hall of Fame. As is the case with many here, I see, my interest was prompted by the presence of Jenny Agutter. What was it about her, aside from the obvious, that made her such a compelling figure from that era? At any rate, I haven't seen the film since Duane gave me a spotty VHS copy back in 1987. And I don't remember it being televised in the US since the 1970s. Pity.
    I'm afraid there is no hope in the foreseeable future of you seeing it anywhere but UCLA [see Barbara's post] or at the BFI in London.



    At least there is a poor quality copy going the rounds. I did have one member offer to tidy up the best version I have but I never heard from him again and can't remember who it was - not a regular!



    I still have some hope of making progress towards a release if it is just the Gallico estate holding it up.

  13. #53
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    I must take issue with Wolfgang's comments - one might equally say all men are suppressed rapists.



    I do hope the ladies here do not think that all men would agree with him.

  14. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fellwanderer
    I must take issue with Wolfgang's comments - one might equally say all men are suppressed rapists.

    I do hope the ladies here do not think that all men would agree with him.
    I don't agree, but I just saw it as a joke and kind of went along with it.

    But for me Jenny makes me think of happier times, gives me some hope that life is truly wonderful (regardless of all the bad things that happen) and even today there is nothing wrong with being innocent and a nice person.

    She has the qualities that make you wish more people were just like her now, I wish she was the girl next door, or that my older sister was/is more like her (but unfortunately we don't get on and never have) and she would be the perfect girlfriend and wife.



    I'm probably not making any sense, but out of all the madness, nastiness, war and hate in the world today, it's always a breath of fresh air seeing and hearing Jenny Agutter on TV or in her films.




  15. #55
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    BBC Radio 4's "A Good Read" is holding a vote for a neglected classic to be re-dramatised with ten writers championing their own favourite and the listeners choosing. I'd only read three of them but it was an absolute certainty which one I'd be voting for:



    BBC - Radio 4 - Open Book - Neglected Classics - Michael Morpurgo's choice



    It was interesting to read that my introduction to The Snow Goose had paralleled Michael Morpurgo's and that our paths had, figuratively speaking, crossed several times in the last 4-5 years.



    I did email the BBC suggesting that, since the film had been a joint BBC/Hallmark venture, they might like to show it again or, failing that, Jenny's Radio 4 reading of it from 1992 but I doubt that will happen!



    I'd urge all members who are eligible to vote to do so - preferably for The Snow Goose, of course

  16. #56
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    The original film is intensely beautiful. It made a big impact on me when I saw it on television way back somewhere when. The book by Paul Gallico is a delight to read as well. It will be interesting if they attempt a remake as it would be hard to improve on or even match the original...

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: UK image45's Avatar
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    You said that when you visited the BFI in London to see 'The Snow Goose' that their copy was from a VHS source! Can you say if this was dubbed from a film print another VT source or from an off air etc?



    It seems odd for them to hold it like this if a broadcast master is held on film or VT

  18. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by image45
    You said that when you visited the BFI in London to see 'The Snow Goose' that their copy was from a VHS source! Can you say if this was dubbed from a film print another VT source or from an off air etc?



    It seems odd for them to hold it like this if a broadcast master is held on film or VT
    That was my impression though I may have been wrong.



    I may book to see it again and will take more notice next time - as long as no-one distracts me

  19. #59
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    Are the BBC Trust doing some consultation at the moment ? Perhaps we as a group could raise issues like The Snow Goose, films and other programmes that are buried but which people would love to see again.



    The BBC aren't as bad as some channels (that have a Van Damme season twice a year), they do still show some older films but equally they trot out the same ones year after year with little imagination, is it even done by a human ?



    They showed a faint glimmer of hope with the films they used stick on late on a Sunday night but that was short lived and stuck to later films. Now these same films are trotted out repeatedly. It's like they get stuck in a rut far too often, like some website recommending the same product you bought last week.



    I am not suggesting we send them a vast list of what we want to see, let's face it we probably wouldn't agree but what we would like is variety.

  20. #60
    Senior Member Country: United States theuofc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by image45
    You said that when you visited the BFI in London to see 'The Snow Goose' that their copy was from a VHS source! Can you say if this was dubbed from a film print another VT source or from an off air etc?



    It seems odd for them to hold it like this if a broadcast master is held on film or VT
    I would guess that the BFI copy is a vhs (perhaps later transferred to a dvd) from the BBC airing in 1971, which they probably received directly from the BBC. The one at the UCLA Archives in Los Angeles is a vhs copy from NBC of their 1971 airing of the Hallmark Hall of Fame production of THE SNOW GOOSE .



    Jump in anyone who has different or additional facts.



    Best, and P.S. Fell: I didn't know you'd watched THE SNOW GOOSE at the BFI sitting next to Jennie. What a thrill!



    Barbara

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