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  1. #1
    Senior Member Country: Australia
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    Although I havn't seen this fine film for many year's it had a profound effect on me in my younger day's.

    Brilliant acting as usual from Richard Attenborough, who also co-produced the film.

    You really had feelings for his character who was "sent to Coventry" by his fellow worker's.

    Those were the day's of powerful unionism and the film gives you a glimpse into how a worker could be treated should he go against his union.

    A little unnerving but a powerful film all the same.



    Dave.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Country: UK A Pemberton's Avatar
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    I agree,it was and still is to me a powerful film ,Richard/Lord Attenborough is a remarkable talent and in the

    history of greats in 20th century film in Britain he has few equals.One particular scene when his character is sat in the works canteen and the whispers and snide comments overwhelm him is extraordinarily powerful,and he and Bryan Forbes gathered an exceptional cast around him ,go look at the IMDB of the film and see the supporting cast,its remarkable.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    I agree apart from the violence which is portrayed in too powderpuff a way.

  4. #4
    Super Moderator Country: Fiji
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    (A Pemberton @ Dec 10 2005, 07:46 PM)

    I agree,it was and still is to me a powerful film ,Richard/Lord Attenborough is a remarkable talent and in the

    history of greats in 20th century film in Britain he has few equals.One particular scene when his character is sat in the works canteen and the whispers and snide comments overwhelm him is extraordinarily powerful,and he and Bryan Forbes gathered an exceptional cast around him ,go look at the IMDB of the film and see the supporting cast,its remarkable
    Too right - including the brilliant Alfred Burke. I've just this minute refreshed my memory on his head-to-head scene with Bette Davis in Hammer's THE NANNY. He's one of the finest actors we've ever produced !



    SMUDGE

  5. #5
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    (smudge @ Dec 11 2005, 03:16 PM)

    Too right - including the brilliant Alfred Burke. I've just this minute refreshed my memory on his head-to-head scene with Bette Davis in Hammer's THE NANNY. He's one of the finest actors we've ever produced !



    SMUDGE
    Absobloodylutely!!

    Alfie Burke is a God!

    Rolls Royce quality actor, smooth as silk; like a fine Swiss watch, he makes it look so easy.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Country: England Harbottle's Avatar
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    (mysteriesofedgarwallace @ Dec 11 2005, 03:27 PM)

    Absobloodylutely!!

    Alfie Burke is a God!

    Rolls Royce quality actor, smooth as silk; like a fine Swiss watch, he makes it look so easy.
    How true cannot get enough of Public Eye and I'm currently enjoying watching him in the late 70's series Enemy At The Door

  7. #7
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    (Harbottle @ Dec 12 2005, 01:57 PM)

    How true cannot get enough of Public Eye and I'm currently enjoying watching him in the late 70's series Enemy At The Door
    Just watched Alf in a very early 'Minder' when Dennis Waterman had hair and was very fit!! I'm enjoying watching these early progs; UFO, Strange Report, Brideshead Revisited and others.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    (Harbottle @ Dec 12 2005, 01:57 PM)

    How true cannot get enough of Public Eye and I'm currently enjoying watching him in the late 70's series Enemy At The Door
    I've watched both sets of Public Eye twice so far. Pure magic.

    Personally, I prefer the Brighton series (I guess mainly because I know most of the locations)

    I hope Network release some more next year.

    I've been tempted by Enemy at the Door, too......

  9. #9
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    (JIM @ Dec 12 2005, 03:17 PM)

    Just watched Alf in a very early 'Minder' when Dennis Waterman had hair and was very fit!! I'm enjoying watching these early progs; UFO, Strange Report, Brideshead Revisited and others.
    Yes, I caught the last 20 mins of this. Waterman looked fitter, whereas now he looks like a fat pisshead.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK A Pemberton's Avatar
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    Splendid melodrama,plently of angry, bolshie and rebelious young men sending Richard Attenborough "to Coventry" with tragic consequences.



    Worth watching just for the excellent cast list , watch and see how many you recall ,Ill start you off with the excellent Alfred Burke and Bernard Lee...............:





    Channel 4.... 13.45 Tuesday 30th January.

  11. #11
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    What the Papers Said:



    Beaver Films was a new production company set up by Richard Attenborough and Bryan Forbes within the Allied Film Makers framework. The Angry Silence was chosen as their first project. The film's treatment of a strike immediately provoked controversy, especially in the labour movement. The Trades Council in Ipswich, where some of the film had been shot, for example, passed a motion of boycott against the film. The Miners Union in South Wales called on cinemas and miners' welfare institutes not to show the film. 'This sort of Fascist behaviour is just what the film is about', responded Attenborough. 'Mob rule by a few scheming Communists.' (Sunday Despatch, 17 April 1960)

    Humbly and most sincerely I salute . . . the courage and, yes, the genius of Richard Attenborough and a brilliant new team of British film-makers who have produced a story that will shock you and shame you, make you laugh but more often bring you to tears - a topical, controversial, vitriolic masterpiece.
    (Donald Gomery, Daily Express, 11 March 1960)

    A film of rare quality and impressive realism . The Angry Silence is not a biased film. It tells its story with honesty and with understanding. It has about it the clear ring of truth. (The Times, 14 March 1960)



    The film purports to be an attack on conformity. But it is entirely conformist itself. It accepts the conformist image of Communists, shop-stewards, wildcat strikes and sheep-like workers, and ends by gloating over the violence it sets out to condemn. Above all, The Angry Silence sees people in terms of a mob to be manipulated - and in this it is a direct reflection of the way the makers of the film see their audience. For although the film ostensibly condemns those who manipulate, it is, in itself, a thorough-going exercise in manipulation. There is no attempt to work honestly at communicating the truth of human experience. One eye is always on the shock effect to be produced on the back stalls. (Albert Hunt in Denys Thompson (ed.), Discrimination and Popular

    Culture, Penguin, 1964, p.111)



    The strikers are apathetic, ignorant, irresponsible, easily driven, infested with thugs and on the point of degenerating into a yelling mob... we do seem to be in the presence of a right-wing denunciation of the collective spirit as equivalent to sheep-like acquiescence in mob violence. (Raymond Durgnat, A Mirror for England, pp.72-3)



    D

  12. #12
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    name='dylan']What the Papers Said:



    Beaver Films was a new production company set up by Richard Attenborough and

    Bryan Forbes within the Allied Film Makers framework. The Angry Silence was

    chosen as their first project. The film's treatment of a strike immediately

    provoked controversy, especially in the labour movement. The Trades Council in

    Ipswich, where some of the film had been shot, for example, passed a motion of

    boycott against the film. The Miners Union in South Wales called on cinemas and

    miners' welfare institutes not to show the film. 'This sort of Fascist

    behaviour is just what the film is about', responded Attenborough. 'Mob rule by

    a few scheming Communists.' (Sunday Despatch, 17 April 1960)



    Humbly and most sincerely I salute . . . the courage and, yes, the genius of

    Richard Attenborough and a brilliant new team of British film-makers who have

    produced a story that will shock you and shame you, make you laugh but more

    often bring you to tears - a topical, controversial, vitriolic masterpiece.

    (Donald Gomery, Daily Express, 11 March 1960)



    A film of rare quality and impressive realism . The Angry Silence is not a

    biased film. It tells its story with honesty and with understanding. It has

    about it the clear ring of truth. (The Times, 14 March 1960)



    The film purports to be an attack on conformity. But it is entirely conformist itself. It accepts the conformist image of Communists, shop-stewards, wildcat strikes and sheep-like workers, and ends by gloating over the violence it sets out to condemn. Above all, The Angry Silence sees people in terms of a mob to be manipulated - and in this it is a direct reflection of the way the makers of the film see their audience. For although the film ostensibly condemns those who manipulate, it is, in itself, a thorough-going exercise in manipulation. There is no attempt to work honestly at communicating the truth of human experience. One eye is always on the shock effect to be produced on the back stalls. (Albert Hunt in Denys Thompson (ed.), Discrimination and Popular

    Culture, Penguin, 1964, p.111)



    The strikers are apathetic, ignorant, irresponsible, easily driven, infested

    with thugs and on the point of degenerating into a yelling mob... we do seem

    to be in the presence of a right-wing denunciation of the collective spirit as

    equivalent to sheep-like acquiescence in mob violence. (Raymond Durgnat, A

    Mirror for England, pp.72-3)



    D
    this film is bang on ......i ve worked in engineering for 25 years and how this film is potrayed with the workers is so brilliant .....even today where i work still as the feel of this film.bullies stick together but when are confronted on their own are pathetic ....ive seen this so much.....richard attenboroughs plays this character so brilliant what a british acting talent he is..100% gold

  13. #13
    Senior Member Country: UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by A Pemberton
    I agree,it was and still is to me a powerful film ,Richard/Lord Attenborough is a remarkable talent and in the

    history of greats in 20th century film in Britain he has few equals.One particular scene when his character is sat in the works canteen and the whispers and snide comments overwhelm him is extraordinarily powerful,and he and Bryan Forbes gathered an exceptional cast around him ,go look at the IMDB of the film and see the supporting cast,its remarkable.
    The joint efforts of Dickie & Brian Forbes in this film and Seance on a wet afternoon resulted in 2 classics. You hear a lot about Dickie but not so much about Forbes, I still think of him as a young chap when in reality he must be mid seventies. Lovely,lovely wife, in fact both of them have lovely wives.

  14. #14
    Senior Member Country: UK Wee Sonny MacGregor's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevie boy
    The joint efforts of Dickie & Brian Forbes in this film and Seance on a wet afternoon resulted in 2 classics. You hear a lot about Dickie but not so much about Forbes, I still think of him as a young chap when in reality he must be mid seventies. Lovely,lovely wife, in fact both of them have lovely wives.
    Yes, Forbesy definitely an unsung hero of the British cinema - and he's now a remarkable 81. In my estimation, The League of Gentlemen can be added to the two classics you've mentioned. Sadly, he has MS but looked pretty good at John Mills's memorial service.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wee Sonny MacGregor
    Yes, Forbesy definitely an unsung hero of the British cinema - and he's now a remarkable 81. In my estimation, The League of Gentlemen can be added to the two classics you've mentioned. Sadly, he has MS but looked pretty good at John Mills's memorial service.


    Yes at that stage Forbes looked to be going onto superstardom as a director and it is somewhat poignant that he has fallen off the radar while Dickie(who I love) is still going strong. And yes of course the wonderful League of gentlemen

  16. #16
    Administrator Country: Wales Steve Crook's Avatar
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    Whistle Down the Wind (1961) was quite good as well



    Bryan (with a 'y') Forbes also produced The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970) and directed The L-Shaped Room (1962), The Wrong Box (1966), The Slipper and the Rose (1976) and quite a few other gems



    Steve

  17. #17
    Super Moderator Country: UK batman's Avatar
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    He directed a rather good mystery thriller in the 1980s called The Naked Face with Roger Moore, Rod Steiger and Elliott Gould. He finished off his directorial career with a version of his own novel The Endless Game, a Len Deighton style spy thriller with Albert Finney and George Segal. The latter is especially worth seeing.



    Bats.

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
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    If you are interested in Bryan Forbes, then I'd recommend his autobiography "Notes for a Life", written in the 1970's (lots of copies on Abebooks).



    He has a nice line in self-depracating humour.



    rgds

    Rob

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Crook
    Whistle Down the Wind (1961) was quite good as well

    Bryan (with a 'y') Forbes also produced The Man Who Haunted Himself (1970) and directed The L-Shaped Room (1962), The Wrong Box (1966), The Slipper and the Rose (1976) and quite a few other gems

    Steve
    I have noticed that Dickie Brother in Law Gerald Sim features in some of the Forbes/Atenborough collaborations, good actor

  20. #20
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    Hello,

    Indeed this is a powerful, memorable and influential film. It certainly was a factor in my development and I would love to see it again.

    Shaun

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