Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 23
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    768
    Liked
    0 times
    To all those who have a copy of 'the maggie' - query?



    How is your soundtrack? My copy is dreadful. I have to turn the sound right up, with the consequent 'hiss'.



    I have a new tele and video machine, so it's not them.



    Any remarks please?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    9,605
    Liked
    151 times
    I copied it from a CH4 showing and the sound is fine.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    768
    Liked
    0 times
    OK DB7 - I'LL WAIT FOR THE RE-SHOWING OF THE MAGGIE. I DID THINK THEY MAY HAVE SHOWN IT QUITE SOON, AS HUBERT GREGG, THE LONG SUFFERING SECRETARY TO PAUL DOUGLAS' CHARACTER, HAS RECENTLY DIED. ONE CAN LIVE IN HOPE.



    THERE IS AN ACTOR IN THE FILM, WHO PLAYS ONE OF THE SKIPPERS, WENT BY THE NAME OF MOULTRIE KELSALL; HE WAS ALSO IN "HORNBLOWER RN" WITH GREGORY PECK. KELSALL PLAYED 'MR CRISTAL'. JUST A USELESS SNIPPET, BUT IF ANYONE KNOWS ANYTHING ABOUT THIS SCOT, THEN I WOULD BE INTERESTED TO HEAR FROM YOU. PARTICULARLY AS WE BEAR THE SAME SURNAME.



    WHAT AN EXCELLENT SITE THIS 'BRITMOVIE' SITE IS!!!

  4. #4
    Rennie
    Guest
    A snippet of information on Moultrie Kelsall quoted from a 1956ish 'Who's Who'.



    'Began career as manager of the Scottish National Players in 1928. Then turned to radio and television as actor, producer and writer'.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    172
    Liked
    0 times
    I cribbed this from an old copy of Radio Times that I found on the web. He was born on 24th October 1901 in Bearsden, Scotland and passed away on 12th February 1980 at Blair Logie, Scotland. His wife was Ruby Dun, a musician.



    "Moultrie Kelsall, a Scot from Glasgow who took a degree in engineering before turning to the theatre. In 1931 he joined the BBC in Scotland, later came to London, and produced many radio and television programmes before leaving in 1947 to concentrate on acting and writing. He has since done a great deal of broadcasting and appeared in numerous television productions, among them Doctor Finlay's Casebook, and the serials Kidnapped and Witch Wood (on BBC-2). Kelsall now lives in Edinburgh, a man of many interests, from architecture to antique furniture"

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    768
    Liked
    0 times
    THANKS TO RENNIE AND SGT DUDFOOT FOR THE INFO ON MOULTRIE KELSALL.



    I STILL CAN'T GET OVER THIS TERRIFIC BRIT-MOVIE WEBBY. I REALLY THOUGHT I WAS THE ONLY ONE IN BRITAIN WHO LOVED 'OLD' BRIT FILMS! NOW I FIND I'M NOT ALONE - THANKS TO YOU ALL!! thumbs_u

  7. #7
    Senior Member Country: England
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    203
    Liked
    1 times
    You and me both, Jim mate. My wife thinks I am a right old saddo 'cos I like these old Brit movies.

    Give me Stanley Holloway over George Burns anyday!

  8. #8
    Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    99
    Liked
    2 times
    Moultrie Kelsall was always turning up in films - especially those with a Scottish setting! But my first introduction to him was as the Police Inspector in the early episdodes of the Granada-made TV drama The Odd Man . William Mervyn took over in later series.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    768
    Liked
    0 times
    Thanks for the info folks - that's a lot more than I knew about him before. thumbs_u

  10. #10
    Senior Member Country: UK DB7's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2002
    Posts
    9,605
    Liked
    151 times
    Michael Caton-Jones talks to Sheila Johnston about Alexander Mackendrick's The Maggie (1954)



    Many directors, canvassed for this series, nominate a classic from the critical pantheon. Not Michael Caton-Jones: his instant choice is The Maggie.(Filed: 18/03/2006)





    Caton-Jones's Shooting Dogs is a drama about the Rwandan genocide



    "It's a little bit off the beaten track," says the director, who has two films opening this month - Shooting Dogs, a drama about Rwanda, and Basic Instinct 2. "And I know it's not to everybody's taste. But I'm very fond of it, like a good old girlfriend."



    The film tells of a rich American tricked into renting an ancient rust-bucket - the Maggie - to ferry his belongings from Glasgow to a holiday home in the Western Isles. Everything goes horribly wrong, of course. But Mactaggart, the skipper, is desperate for cash and refuses to relinquish the assignment.



    It seems like a quintessential Ealing scenario. Yet, compared with similar comedies by other hands, such as The Titchfield Thunderbolt or Passport to Pimlico, The Maggie is highly ambivalent about where its loyalties lie. "Mackendrick had a very cynical, dark world view in many respects. You like the captain, and yet he's a drunk, a liar and a thief.



    "The Maggie is about Scotland and America," continues Caton-Jones, whose career, like that of Mackendrick - an American of Scottish descent - has oscillated between the two poles. "It's about the dying of an age, which is what I was thinking about when I made Rob Roy - the shock of the new versus old values and the inevitability of progress. That's a very common theme in Scottish culture."



    The Maggie is widely seen as the least successful of Mackendrick's Ealing films (which included Whisky Galore! and The Ladykillers). "I disagree," says Caton-Jones. "It's a gem. People have said it's a minor work because it's not about anything deep or grand. But the technique is incredible.



    "I discovered it in my first year at film school and learnt more from it than I did from a lot of artier films. I remember being blown away by the economy and the precision of his choreography. You can tell a story through two-shots [medium-range shots with two actors] and close-ups, and that's fine. But you can also develop a scene within the depth of the frame."



    Viewing The Maggie, you're indeed struck by how often Mackendrick does this, with little visual gags exploding in the background of the image and actors moving around on different planes within it.



    "There's a moment," explains Caton-Jones, "when Mactaggart goes to the shipping office in Glasgow and overhears Pusey, the agent trying to charter a ship on behalf of the American, on the telephone. It's in an office with a doorway, and behind that there's an outer office with a revolving door. Five characters are in the scene: Pusey in the foreground, the captain in the middle, and behind him the other guys from his crew.



    'It's very rich in depth, and they're all moving all the time, but you can always see the five of them within the shot. I studied how to disguise subtle camera moves by the movement of the actors and how to make compositions that let you see the characters' importance in the story. To look at it is to think, 'My God, you're good! This is what you can do as a director. This is what directing is.' "



    Another key scene goes to the opposite extreme. "The captain has been told that his ship has been sold out from underneath him. It's simply a big close-up, so his head pretty much fills the image and, out of focus, there's his crew." The shot isolates the crafty skipper, who assumes an almost tragic status. "The power of the actor's expression is really strong. It's like something from a John Ford film.



    "If you know how to do it, you can pull in the right technique at every given point. But you don't notice that Mackendrick is doing all this stuff. That to me is the aim of good direction: not to stand between the story and the audience, but to influence them without getting caught."



    Mackendrick directed only nine features. "He ended up spending a lot of time getting films together and not a lot of time actually making them."



    Back in America, he made another great film, Sweet Smell of Success, but his last 25 years were spent heading the film school at CalArts, Los Angeles.



    "When I went to live in Hollywood, I looked him up and used to have lunch with him," Caton-Jones recalls. "He was not well and was kind of forgotten, but he was everything I thought he would be, and more: incredibly bright, articulate and passionate.



    I saw this director sitting in Hollywood who was a mad genius and nobody knew who the hell he was. I thought to myself, 'Well, if you're lucky, that's where you'll end up'."

  11. #11
    Member Country: UK Ealingfilmfan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    94
    Liked
    2 times
    Another favourite of mine, never tire of seeing this, one of the finest films to emerge from Ealing studios......

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    11
    Liked
    0 times
    Hello all,



    I was just thinking, if only The Maggie could have been seen as separate somewhow from the body of Ealing films. It's often overlooked as it doesn't have the classic Ealing qualities that seem to me personally to diminish those films. Compared to Whisky Galore, i'd take The Maggie every time. It deserves an indepedent release..

  13. #13
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,044
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by Ealingfilmfan
    Another favourite of mine, never tire of seeing this, one of the finest films to emerge from Ealing studios......


    a lovely film. The Americans cargo is ruined ,there is no insurance and the skipper says, if there is ever anything else you want (or words to that effect) lovely.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    53
    Liked
    0 times
    Must agree a great film of a time gone by, paul douglas was a fine actor

  15. #15
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2,044
    Liked
    1 times
    Quote Originally Posted by M.Powell
    Hello all,



    I was just thinking, if only The Maggie could have been seen as separate somewhow from the body of Ealing films. It's often overlooked as it doesn't have the classic Ealing qualities that seem to me personally to diminish those films. Compared to Whisky Galore, i'd take The Maggie every time. It deserves an indepedent release..
    It is one of the best secret Ealing films. The Maggie is a beautifully crafted little film, full of characters and there are some killer lines.

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    31
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by stevie boy
    It is one of the best secret Ealing films. The Maggie is a beautifully crafted little film, full of characters and there are some killer lines.


    It's certainly a lovely film, but I prefer Whisky Galore.

  17. #17
    Member Country: France
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Posts
    31
    Liked
    0 times
    A great wee film, but what a shock to find that "Dougie the wee boy" is nearly 70 now, and as far as I can see never made anything else, unlike Geoffrey Keen who must have appeared in more Brit films than any other character actor - Or, does anyone no any better?

    Cy

  18. #18
    Senior Member Country: UK
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    355
    Liked
    0 times
    Always liked this one in some ways it seems to prefigure 'Local Hero'.



    Simon

  19. #19
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    3
    Liked
    0 times
    a large part of it was filmed here on Islay - the places have not changed much at all.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    31
    Liked
    0 times
    Quote Originally Posted by mark reynier
    a large part of it was filmed here on Islay - the places have not changed much at all.


    Watched it again last night as a result of this thread. Nice, gentle film. What a shame they don't make them like that now.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Maggie Smith
    By BEN in forum Actors and Actresses
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15-11-15, 02:45 AM
  2. Maggie Jones R.I.P.
    By Euryale in forum Obituaries
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 13-12-09, 03:37 PM
  3. Maggie and Her
    By Miss Marple in forum British Television
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-12-07, 02:35 PM
  4. Maggie
    By intervision in forum Looking for a Video/DVD (TV)
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 18-10-07, 02:29 AM
  5. The Maggie
    By DB7 in forum Films on TV
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-08-04, 11:08 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts