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  1. #41
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    Kubrick's stance changed, though, when two police officers came to see him at his Hertfordshire home. "I'd had my head firmly in the sand," says Christiane. "But I woke up at that point. The police said this was now beyond normal, and we had to do something. We had people standing in front of our house; our children were being approached; wherever I went people would come up to me. I don't think we even knew how famous he really was at that point. The noose was closing on us, so we did get frightened." Having fought against the film's censorship, Kubrick then effectively censored it himself, quietly withdrawing it in early 1974. "Stanley felt stupid," says Christiane, "but relieved."
    The withdrawal as an act of self-censorship is interesting not least because it took several years before anyone noticed it had been withdrawn! The film played for at least a year in London's West End and did a full UK regional release. By the time Kubrick withdrew it the furore over film content had already moved on to Last Tango In Paris, The Exorcist, Emmanuelle, etc

  2. #42
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    I well remember the days of the mid-70s onwards, where the only images from this film you could find anywhere was the frames on the back of the soundtrack album and a few illustrations in film reference books.

    Today, imagery from this movie is as common and familiar as Carry On!


    At one time, this movie had real rarity value and many people just knew the title and that it was 'banned for being too violent' .


    Difficult to believe now that this film was, for many years, a total mystery and completely 'outa sight' for many who were too young to see it first time around.
    Last edited by Odeon68; 08-07-16 at 06:08 PM.

  3. #43
    Senior Member Country: England DeadlyStranger's Avatar
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    I just got an American friend to tape it for me in the '80s. Importing the Dutch Warner tape was a fairly common tactic as well last century. It was out there if you wanted it.

    Great film, lot of comedy elements in it too - "victim of the modern age!" - how many cult films was that guy in?

  4. #44
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    I waited until Dec 1990 to see it, Deadly: I found a seller in the small ads in NME. If I had known about the european tapes I would likely have gone that route.


    I mean a wee bit further back [regarding VHS/ NTSC copies]: I first noticed the films' notorious reputation around 1976: VCRS did indeed exist then but were prohibitively expensive on the domestic market , and out of my price range, at least, until quite far into the 80s.

    The film , when I eventually got to see it, never disappointed me, even after all that expectation.
    Last edited by Odeon68; 09-07-16 at 07:15 AM.

  5. #45
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    My first glimpse of this movie was on reels of 8mm home cinema. The movie was available in maybe thirteen reels (does that sound right?) and a friend of mine had bought "some" of them at a car boot sale. So we ended up watching three or four of the reels, without sound, and thinking we were so cool. That was back in around 1982. Finally saw it properly on TV after Kubrick's passing. Finally got to hear the soundtrack and see the moving images, that had become iconic for so many years.

  6. #46
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    I had no idea it was avaiaible on home 8mm film, Stoneage---sounds as if this was an unofficial version, as I doubt if Kubrick would have allowed this release------no sound also sounds a bit limiting, but I wish I could have seen even silent clips of this film in 1982!


    I suppose that playing the vinyl soundtrack album along with the projected images would have been great fun at that time---we got it TOO EASY today, and folk still complain about splices, missing frames, etc!


    I remember during the long ban, you could not even see a CLIP of this movie on UK TV [it was covered during the 1971 release, with accompanying clips for advertising , but later on, no moving clips ever turned up for ages, other than a few stills] , until Channel 4 broke the mould on this in a documantary hosted by Charlie Parsons in the early 90s.
    Last edited by Odeon68; 09-07-16 at 09:51 AM.

  7. #47
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odeon68 View Post
    I waited until Dec 1990 to see it, Deadly: I found a seller in the small ads in NME. If I had known about the european tapes I would likely have gone that route.


    I mean a wee bit further back [regarding VHS/ NTSC copies]: I first noticed the films' notorious reputation around 1976: VCRS did indeed exist then but were prohibitively expensive on the domestic market , and out of my price range, at least, until quite far into the 80s.

    The film , when I eventually got to see it, never disappointed me, even after all that expectation.
    I was so desperate to see this film I paid �45 for a dodgy bootleg, the same year you mentioned !..

    Quote Originally Posted by Odeon68 View Post
    I had no idea it was avaiaible on home 8mm film, Stoneage---sounds as if this was an unofficial version, as I doubt if Kubrick would have allowed this release------no sound also sounds a bit limiting, but I wish I could have seen even silent clips of this film in 1982!


    I suppose that playing the vinyl soundtrack album along with the projected images would have been great fun at that time---we got it TOO EASY today, and folk still complain about splices, missing frames, etc!


    I remember during the long ban, you could not even see a CLIP of this movie on UK TV [it was covered during the 1971 release, with accompanying clips for advertising , but later on, no moving clips ever turned up for ages, other than a few stills] , until Channel 4 broke the mould on this in a documantary hosted by Charlie Parsons in the early 90s.
    I recall the documentary, I think it was the one where the film was being shown in Paris on a very regular basis, if not continuously, and he purchases a ticket to see it.

    I was surprised the film was reissued just ten months after Stanley's death, Warner bros must have approached Christiane for permission, I did see it at my local multiplex, March 1999 I think it was, only me and one other in the Cinema, there were posters on the sides of Buses also.

  8. #48
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    Hiya Mark;


    ---it sounds we were both bitten by the 'Clockwork' bug when growing up: in my case, it was the photos I saw of Mc Dowell in his bizarre bovver gear, gloating direct to camera, that managed to disturb me like no other fictional character ever came close to: the inhuman decor of the Korova Milk Bar also looked the stuff of nightmares. As I could only see selected still images, the strange society depicted in these movie stills played on my imagination, promising a feast of unpleasant imagery in the film which I was also aching to see.


    I took a risk in 1990 paying 15 pounds to a stanger in the post [postal orders then] and I got a relatively clear second-generation VHS copy, which done me for about 10 years.

    I still watch it quite a lot, although I sometimes skip past the Adrienne Corri stripping scene, which to me is the stuff of nightmares...powerful stuff, though, for all it's unwholesomeness...just the fascination we can have with evil, I guess?


    To me, the last two thirds of the film do not look very futuristic, and had the movie continued in the same outlandish vein as the opening 40 minutes I probably would have rated it the ultimate 'experimental' film ever---at least from mainstream cinema. But I suppose that obvious X rating cut deep into the financing , affecting set design, etc.


    I hear Blade Runner [another very good sci-fi film in my view] is getting a sequel--the purists are up in arms------ so will this UK Dystopian film ever get a remake, I wonder [the novella is a lot more detailed than the film version, as I am sure you are aware]?
    Last edited by Odeon68; 09-07-16 at 12:41 PM.

  9. #49
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odeon68 View Post
    Hiya Mark;


    ---it sounds we were both bitten by the 'Clockwork' bug when growing up: in my case, it was the photos I saw of Mc Dowell in his bizarre bovver gear, gloating direct to camera, that managed to disturb me like no other fictional character ever came close to: the inhuman decor of the Korova Milk Bar also looked the stuff of nightmares. As I could only see selected still images, the strange society depicted in these movie stills played on my imagination, promising a feast of unpleasant imagery in the film which I was also aching to see.


    I took a risk in 1990 paying 15 pounds to a stanger in the post [postal orders then] and I got a relatively clear second-generation VHS copy, which done me for about 10 years.

    I still watch it quite a lot, although I sometimes skip past the Adrienne Corri stripping scene, which to me is the stuff of nightmares...powerful stuff, though, for all it's unwholesomeness...just the fascination we can have with evil, I guess?


    To me, the last two thirds of the film do not look very futuristic, and had the movie continued in the same outlandish vein as the opening 40 minutes I probably would have rated it the ultimate 'experimental' film ever---at least from mainstream cinema. But I suppose that obvious X rating cut deep into the financing , affecting set design, etc.


    I hear Blade Runner [another very good sci-fi film in my view] is getting a sequel--the purists are up in arms------ so will this UK Dystopian film ever get a remake, I wonder [the novella is a lot more detailed than the film version, as I am sure you are aware]?
    Hi Odeon 68, I have to admit I've only seen Bladerunner once, I couldn't really get that much into it, though I've heard a remake is in the pipeline, the original has been criticized for no mention of the Internet, but then how could they have predicted the Internet when the film was made lol ?..(1982 I assume)

    Back to CO, I agree the scenes when Alex's eyes are clamped open make me squirm a little, no matter how many times I watch it, I look away when Stephen Berkoff's character gobs in Alex's face, and mixed with blood too, it's not a pretty sight.

    The Adrienne Corri assault scene is a powerful one (for the time), I also find that with the Miriam Karlin scene, just as the 'work of art' comes down on her makes me recoil, even though in the both scenes you don't see any acute graphicness, it's all left to the imagination, as was Kubrick's intent no doubt.

    I agree the latter part of the film drags a bit, compared to the fast-paced first part, but CO will always be in my top-ten of fave films !..

  10. #50
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    yes Mark.it's the ultimate cult film, I reckon---unforgettable! Modern films never affected me anywhere close to what this film managed.

  11. #51
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Opinions Differ.

    I remember showing A Clockwork Orange in 1973 and thought it was an absolutely dreadful film, one of the worst I'd ever shown. I'm glad we only had it for six days. The 'X' certificate 'adult' cartoon that supported it, Kama Sutra Rides Again, was even worse.

  12. #52
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    I quite liked that Bob Godfrey animation, darren! I saw it too supporting another feature later in the 70s [I was probably too young then to see it legally, but it slipped through the ratings net in this case].

    I can understand a lot of people not liking A CLOCKWORK ORANGE: so, what would you regard as a good film from 1971?


    I assume you were a projectionist going by your wording, you must have seen most of the releases then.


    This was the era of Railway Children, Bedknobs and Broomsticks, the Abominable Dr Phibes, Diamonds are Forever, Twins of Evil, Vampire Circus, On the Buses [theatrical version] etc etc.
    Last edited by Odeon68; 10-07-16 at 09:58 AM.

  13. #53
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Mark O's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Odeon68 View Post
    yes Mark.it's the ultimate cult film, I reckon---unforgettable! Modern films never affected me anywhere close to what this film managed.
    I reckon it is also, it can't be faulted for it's use of colour and lighting, let alone the sets, though I thought Alex's Parents Tower block Flat was a bit comical (and Mum's wig!)..

    Quote Originally Posted by darrenburnfan View Post
    Opinions Differ.

    I remember showing A Clockwork Orange in 1973 and thought it was an absolutely dreadful film, one of the worst I'd ever shown. I'm glad we only had it for six days. The 'X' certificate 'adult' cartoon that supported it, Kama Sutra Rides Again, was even worse.
    I've read it was banned by Council's in several parts of the Country, Accrington was one, in 1973 at the age of 12 I couldn't have quite got away with being an 18 year old to go and see it, but I could have done 2-3 years later when I used to see X-rated stuff underage like 'Shivers', 'Omen', etc;

    David, may I ask if your Cinema showed 'Straw dogs' ?, that film was also by banned by Councils in some areas, Southend-on-Sea being one.

  14. #54
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Looking back in my programme book on what I showed in 1971, the following stand out as really good and entertaining pictures among the total: Battle of Britain; The Molly Maguires; The Vampire Lovers; Eye Witness plus Some Will, Some Won't; Airport; Chisum; Carry On Loving; When Dinosaurs Ruled the Earth; Lust For a Vampire; Assault; Dad's Army; On the Buses; Oliver!; 10, Rillington Place; The House That Dripped Blood; Up Pompeii; Get Carter; Too Late the Hero; The War Wagon; The Killing of Sister George; When Eight Bells Toll; Jane Eyre (1971 version); Hornet's Nest; The Railway Children and Chariots of the Gods.

  15. #55
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Yes, Mark, I ran Straw Dogs for six days on Monday, July 17th, 1972. Another early 1970s 'X' film containing some very graphic violence, like Soldier Blue had.

  16. #56
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    the films on offer in the very early 70s were not bad at all going by your list, darren.



    At this time I was off to the Saturday morning kids' matinee at the Odeon, virtually every week : 5p/one shilling admission fee!

    I remember for the US film WILLARD there were vinyl large-scale vinyl cut-out photos of rats with glaring eyes plastered over the cinema entrance windows as you went in, around this time.


    I remember a lot of the lurid posters for Hammer Films around this time like DR JEKYLL and SISTER HYDE that looked totally forbidden and exotic to my young eyes......I was only able to catch up with such films much later.



    I did like WHEN DINOSAURS RULED THE EARTH, and I still watch this one today.

  17. #57
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    In those days, we still had a children's Saturday matinee at the Plaza (after decades, they ceased in 1974) and before the show started, I had to try and keep order among over three hundred kids aged 5 to 13 and it was bedlam! I was glad when start time came around and the boss told me I could go up and start the show now, and I retreated to the safety of the projection room. As soon as I dimmed the house lights, opened the curtains and the BBFC certificate appeared on the screen, there was a huge roar of approval from the young audience. The show was timed to last for two hours (sometimes two and a half hours, depending on the length of the feature) so there would be an hour long CFF feature; followed by cartoons and the latest episode of the serial, in between which the boss would climb up on the stage and announce competitions and which boy or girl's birthday it was today, ect. Rank alternated sending us a CFF feature one week and another picture the following week, such as Whistle Down the Wind...the only stipulation being that it had to have a 'U' certificate. We also had matinees from 20th Century-Fox and Warner-Pathe which went down well. Generally, the kids preferred the CFF features, unless it was a film with children as the main characters with which they could identify, such as A Dog of Flanders or Hand in Hand. Admission prices in 1971 were 5 new pence and 7 new pence.

    David.
    Last edited by darrenburnfan; 10-07-16 at 08:04 PM.

  18. #58
    Senior Member Country: Great Britain Odeon68's Avatar
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    yes David, I was there at my local Odeon most weeks and yes it was often chaos! Our presentation started with a rocket countdown ['10-9-8-7-' etc etc ] when the projector started up.

    It was usually Terrytoons/ Bugs Bunny/ The three Stooges/ interval [the rowdiest part, there were checkers with torches calming rowdy kids down] and of course you still had a queue for the usherettes with the ice-creams back then! Kids use to love turning an empty plastic cola cup upside-down then stomping on it: the imploding racket was intense.

    Then we got the CFF film with the famous Trafalgar Square/flock of pigeons. red bus opening---some of these were in black and white, but we never minded.

    The sound was probably mono then as well, but nobody minded about that either.

    They also showed 30s Flash Gordon, a US import from the early 30s called OUR GANG with a very young Mickey Rooney [a very early talkie series] and another serial called Captain Marvel.

    It was well attended but there was no real competition from TV until later---it was never the same with TV though.

  19. #59
    Senior Member Country: England darrenburnfan's Avatar
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    Amazingly, 35mm copies of those serials, some of them dating back to the 1930s and 1940s (although printed on safety stock) were still on catalogue and available to cinemas for children's matinee use as far forward as the 1970s. But I guess they've all since been incinerated, especially as the children's matinees had all ceased by the end of the decade.

  20. #60
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    From my cuttings and posters collection, I've chosen for Odeon68 (post 56) a chance of the very cinema that might have shown at the time Dr.Jekyll and Sister Hyde in the ABC list featured. (Click to enlarge).

    SisterHyde.jpg

    No similar precise ad for Willard but here for everyone is the US/UK poster
    http://originalposter.co.uk/fulldetails.asp?rid=5343

    Again, no list for DINOSAURS just yet, but again the poster illustration
    http://originalposter.co.uk/fulldetails.asp?rid=10042

    Incidentally, its companion film on General Release (ABC Circuit, 25 October 1970) was the 'U' certificate Great Bank Robbery, so no guilt complex in going to see that one.....

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